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post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 4-30-2017, 12:07 AM Thread Starter
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BMW R1150GS riding impressions

Took possession of a 2001 BMW R1150GS this past Tuesday. If anyone remembers my previous thoughts on the line of “air head” BMWs my main points still apply, though there are a few differences to some of my opinions.



1st off, previously I’ve mentioned how poor I felt the transmissions felt to the rider. To me, this is inexcusable given the amount of money BMW charges for one of these machines. I’ve ridden Harley Davidsons with better feel and feedback from the transmission. That mostly still applies, but the GS in question has 43K miles on it.



I was told by the BMW reps on the test rides I did that they get better as they get broken in. Point taken. After 43K miles, the transmission still feels vague. By that I mean, you can’t really feel if it went into a given gear.



Good thing then that there is a gear indicator in a tiny LCD window on the dash. A glance down when you are unsure whether a gear was selected will tell you what gear you are in. The down side is, at speed, you have to take your eyes off the road to see what gear has been selected.



The BMWs I test rode were really new, and the transmissions were not only vague feeling but the gear I selected would frequently not engage, or if it did engage, it would get spit back out and either end up in a false neutral, or back in the previous gear. These characteristics did not endear the brand to me. At all.



Fast forward to earlier this month. A coworker, a guy I’d worked with previously purchased this bike from a mutual friend and coworker at our previous shop. He asked me if I knew anyone who would ride it for him. I was like “Uhhh, me!!” We laughed about it, but then he said, “seriously, you’ll ride it for me?”


I wasn’t sure this was happening. I told him I would and he told me to drop by the shop and pick up the keys. A week or two later, I was sure he’d changed his mind, until I asked him for the keys. He told me to meet him at the shop where we used to work and I could collect the bike and the keys in one shot.



So it was, I met him this past Tuesday and received the keys. I asked him if he had any special instructions or anything concerning the bike. He told me, ride it when you want, where you want as long as you want. I had to clarify. I asked if he was cool with me taking a weekend trip up Hwy 1 or a 4 day trip to Monterey. He said, “whatever man, just ride it. Take care of it and ride it.” COOL.



My first impression was, Jeezus, it really takes serious effort to take this thing off the side stand. There is no, swing a leg over and lift it off. No way. No how.



I’ve developed a technique where I swing my right leg over, but keep my left foot firmly planted. Using that foot for leverage, I power the bars straight and push upright in one motion. As I do this, I slide over the seat. Seems to work well. My riding buddies have tried other methods. None worked for them with this bike.


Once rolling, the heft sort of disappears. Sort of. Coming to a stop requires some planning beyond the normal blip the throttle, bang the down shift, release the clutch lever, and brake at the same time. I have to use the momentum and brakes to slide my butt up to the tank when braking. Then as I reach peak braking, and the bike slows to a near stop, I slide over a bit and get my left foot flat on the ground. I can tip toe both feet, but on a bike this heavy, I don’t like the thought of falling over.



Underway, handling is quite good for such a heavy bike. Turn in is eased by the wide bar, and the big GS can be snapped over into a turn quite quickly. Once over, it has a great deal more ground clearance than one would think. I haven’t scrubbed the ancient Metzeler Tourance tires to the very edge yet, but after a day just riding around town, I’m already nearly there.


The thing does have some handling quirks. On the throttle you can feel the pinion gear climbing the ring gear. The rear of the bike lifts up oddly and points the front to the left. This happens at any rapid take off from a standing start. Underway, I did not get this feeling at all with aggressive throttle roll ons.



Another quirk is the turn signals. The switch for left turn signal is on the left bar. The switch for the right signal is on the right bar. The cancel switch is also on the right bar, above and inboard of the signal switch. The switches only require a light touch to activate them.


Good and bad there. Good because it requires little effort to activate. Bad because it is easy to accidentally activate them. The cancel switch is oddly located and takes a great deal of getting used to. After a whole day of riding around and just playing with the bike, I still have to look to find the cancel switch. It’s getting easier but I still have to look from time to time.



Beyond that, the brakes are almost invisible. They work well, but not like my Ducati or Aprilia. They don’t suck either. So the best analogy is, they work, but they don’t make you think to yourself “wow, this thing stops like crazy” ABS doesn’t seem intrusive either. A 4 finger emergency stop didn’t seem dramatic in the least. The bike simply stopped where and when it was expected to.



The gearing is pretty tall. This requires a lot of clutch slip on launch but once rolling you can lug down in 1st to sub 5 MPH speeds without issue. Roll on the throttle and it just picks up speed from there. No fuss, no screech, nothing. On the freeway, 80 MPH correlates to a mere 3500 RPM in 6th. Both my Ducati and my Aprilia are at around 5K at the same speed. The big Beamer just feels like it’s loafing along.



Really, that’s about all there is to tell. The seat needs to be adjusted to the lower setting. I plan on doing that tomorrow. Also, the wind screen is not my friend. It buffets the top of my helmet to the point it moves my head around at higher speeds. I need to change the oil and filter, which I’ll also do tomorrow. Hopefully, I’ll get all that done in the morning and go for a ride after. I hope so. I need a ride. More on the reason for that in my Ducati thread.


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Last edited by Apriliarider; 4-30-2017 at 12:15 AM.
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post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 5-3-2017, 6:05 PM Thread Starter
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One week in

After a week of riding this GS every day, it very nearly killed me today.

Approaching a red light traffic signal, I got on the brakes and down shifted like normal. Only the brake lever came all the way back to the bar, and slowed my forward progress not one iota. As I was doing normal street speeds in town, it wasn't too big a deal. I down shifted quickly to 1st and got on the rear brake. I stopped without rear ending the small SUV who was unhappy with their choice of lane, and HAD to cut in front of me. It wasn't high drama, but I was NOT super calm once I got it stopped. Once I got to the bank, which was essentially just around the corner, I hopped off to look and see what happened.

The front brake line, from the ABS servo popped right where the line meets the crimped on fitting. Brake fluid everywhere, all over the front tire as well as the rim, fender and brake caliper. Took care of business at the bank, which at the time, was actually more important than the bike, and carefully rode home using just the rear brake. Thankfully, my ride through town was uneventful, and given the low speeds I was going, stopping was not a big deal.

Now I have both it to fix, as well as the 996. Thankfully, the 996 is all but done, only needing me to fit the crank angle sensor and fill with oil and coolant. I've seen this sort of failure before on a similar year R1150S and the repair bill from BMW was beyond outrageous. I'm going to sort out something else though. $1800 for a replacement brake line, and a brake bleed isn't on the agenda, nor the owners budget. Later..........sean
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Last edited by Apriliarider; 5-3-2017 at 6:07 PM.
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post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 5-4-2017, 10:55 AM
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Welcome to that Euro owner life.

I liked my ride on an R1200GS. I must say though, it is a heavy brute. I honestly am more in the camp of ADV on a X-300 Versys!

I see you are still quite long winded with your posts. Glad to see you are still posting!

Chicago, IL - Cincinnati, OH
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post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 5-4-2017, 5:30 PM
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I'm confused, why does he want someone to ride his motorcycle? Don't get me wrong, if someone offered to let me take their bike and ride it, I would leap at the opportunity.

I've never fully understood the way some people go crazy over the GS. I know it is a capable motorcycle, but there seems to be a crowd that thinks it is the end all be all of adventure bikes. Probably has something to do with some movie stars riding a pair around the world and having a camera man follow them and make a tv show out of it.


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post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 5-4-2017, 11:51 PM Thread Starter
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I'm confused, why does he want someone to ride his motorcycle? Don't get me wrong, if someone offered to let me take their bike and ride it, I would leap at the opportunity.
As I wrote previously, he's a friend and coworker. He bought the bike to commute from Vallejo but as he has more kids now, than he did when he decided he wanted to use the bike to commute, he no longer has time to ride it.

He rode it twice in the span of a year and decided if it didn't get ridden it was going to rot. He was right. Hence the sudden departure of the front brake line.
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I've never fully understood the way some people go crazy over the GS. I know it is a capable motorcycle, but there seems to be a crowd that thinks it is the end all be all of adventure bikes.
I've never understood it either. I thought I might get an inkling with experience on one, but I still don't get it.

It is a reasonably good motorcycle. I think it's capable and in the right hands, it can carve a decent enough corner. It just isn't what I'd call a "fun" motorcycle.

Don't get me wrong, any two wheeler is more fun than a four wheeler in my eyes. I think on a curvy road, the Ducati, Aprilia or even one of my GSXRs is more fun.

On the freeway though, I'd prefer the GS. It is comfortable and you can see so much more around you on it. Also, the bags are super convenient. The immense weight is not.

Undecided at the moment if I wanna continue with it. I decided when the owner loaned it to me that I would try to get used to it, and if I could, then I'd take it to Monterey this year.

Hate the shield and I already got rid of the crash bar. Owner tells me he has a shorter shield that might be better. Once the new set of Spiegler lines arrives, I'm gonna ask for the shorter shield.

Quote:
I see you are still quite long winded with your posts.
I normally write down my thoughts in word, then copy and paste into the forum. Hence, I can put alot down in a short time.........more later as things progress........sean


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post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 5-6-2017, 1:49 PM Thread Starter
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So after consulting with the owner, and offering my thoughts on near death due to the brake line failure, I ended up doing quite a bit of research.

He apologized but then offered he was glad it was me in the saddle as if it were him, he would have crashed.

I guess, but it still did little to endear the big BMW to me. In my research on the matter I found this was a common failure on BMWs of those years of manufacture.

The failures are well documented on the various BMW owners forums around the web. The GS owners forum (GSpot) indicated a community awareness of this issue a number of years back.

After thorough reading on the subject there, the common theme was to replace all the brake lines with a Spiegler LLC kit. I forwarded this information to the owner and he ordered it right then from Spiegler.

I will replace the lines and bleed the brakes for him (apparently, BMWs ABS II does not need to be plugged in to a computer to actuate the servos for bleeding) and take an initial test ride.

Once I'm comfortable that the brakes work as they should, I'm contemplating returning the bike to its previous state of storage.

I'm not sure I want to continue to ride it based on the failure of the brake line. My logical self is telling me that there could be some other potential failures lurking that have yet to rear their head.

My buddy Pete, whom I often consult with, particularly where anything Adventure related is concerned, has expressed the same sentiment. Continuing to ride this thing may be riding on borrowed time.

When it fails next could be in a similar situation, where I come out on top again, or it could be way out in the middle of no where, leaving me stranded. Or worse.

This is just contemplation though. I still have it on my brain that this is the perfect bike to take to Monterey on my annual World Superbike pilgrimage in July.

That is now only 2 months away so I have that long to sort the big GS out. Either that, or return it to the owner and just take my Aprilia again.

While I'd love to take the Ducati, it isn't meant for that. I'd probably be in worse shape on arriving in Monterey than I am with the Aprilia.

No luggage provision means either I manufacture some before we go, or wear a back pack. As the Aprilia is already set up for a Monterey trip, I am disinclined to do either.

More later, once the new Spiegler kit arrives and I get the big GS back on the road.......sean


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post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 5-8-2017, 11:50 AM
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Sean, are you camping this year or are you staying in a hotel room again?

I am still trying to figure out what I will be doing. I really want to come down again, but bring the bike. Which means the wife won't be coming cause she won't ride.


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post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 5-8-2017, 11:59 PM Thread Starter
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Sean, are you camping this year or are you staying in a hotel room again?
Yeah man, we're staying down the street a bit though this year. I can't remember the name of the hotel, but it's right there at the intersection where Sly McFly's is. Bay side of the street above that expensive Italian Trattoria.

My wife will ride....she just won't camp anymore. We did that the first few years we went. Then one year it rained like hell and she refused to camp after that.

If you are intent on camping, we used to stay at this little upscale camp ground over in Carmel Valley called Saddle Mountain.

They offer tent camping as well as "yurts" and TeePees in case you don't wanna haul your tent down. IIRC, they even had a couple of "tent cabins" which is really just a frame with canvas thrown over it.

Hot showers and even a swimming pool....kinda relaxing after a day at the track. Not a lot of noise there and it's well away from everything.

Riding in over Laureles Grade Road in the morning is quite a good way to kick off your day....specially if you manage it before the locals get on road.

You know how to get in touch if you make it down......sean


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post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 5-16-2017, 8:33 PM Thread Starter
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Got a text while I was in Petaluma on Saturday from my buddy and owner of the BMW now in my care. He texted that the lines were in.

I received the lines today so, might attempt to install them after dinner. Maybe. Kinda windy out right now. Might not be a good idea to be pouring brake fluid if you know what I mean.

More later, once the lines are installed and the systems bled......sean


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post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 5-18-2017, 8:36 PM Thread Starter
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Well....that was.....an experience. Really not one I care to repeat.

I went out to install the new lines. A few things became evident as soon as I started the process.

1st, the fittings are not standard, nor motorcycle standard. I mean, I know what I need normally to do this sort of thing. A 10mm wrench, an 8mm wrench for the bleeders, and maybe a 12mm wrench if the banjo bolts are large-ish.

Not on the GS. The banjo bolts are button head allen bolts. Nothing typical about that. There are fittings where the flexible line goes into a union where it meets a steel hard line like you'd find on a car.

2nd, those line nuts on the hard lines? They're 11mm. What? My wife told me after she'd heard me utter some choice curses that maybe I should have told the owner to take it to BMW.

3rd, that line that burst? You have to remove the tank to remove that line because the union it is threaded into has to be held fast in the process or else it twists around and the banjo fitting will not loosen (it's a button head allen remember)

So, I ended up giving in for the night. Last night, I re-approached and successfully removed the tank, and the affected lines. New Speigler lines are installed, and the system is bled. Sorta.

I rode it around my neighborhood last night after I got it all back together and while it stopped, it still didn't feel right. So, I'm going to attempt to bleed it more tonight. I should be right there with where the lever is on my Aprilia, Ducati and GSXR.

Saabnut can attest to the feel at the lever on the old Gixxer. Amazing to me as it is still on the same factory lines it came with in 1992!!!

Once the rotors were replaced with some quality EBC full floating rotors and "green stuff" pads they are stellar. Easily as good as the Brembo's on both of my Italians.

As the BMW is equipped with Brembo's too, it should be in the same ball park at least. Right now, it feels like there is still air in the system in some ways as the lever feel is different every time you grab a handful.

More later, once I get the lever feel sorted out......sean


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post #11 of 16 (permalink) Old 5-18-2017, 11:40 PM
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I've ridden that same model and experienced the exact same shifting issues too. They appear to be unique to the pre 1200cc BMW's. I've also ridden newer water cooled BMW boxers including the 2016 GS and they shifted perfectly. The new GS has a slipper and assisted clutch which is super light and exceptionally smooth.

The new 1200 GS some how has an exceptionally low center of gravity unlike the older GS models. In fact it is lighter up top than my Versys 650. Not sure how they did it.

One weird thing I find all boxer engined bikes seem to do is twist(lean) the bike when you rev the engine or step on the throttle, I guess because of the engine orientation. Not a bad thing but something that takes getting used to.

IMO experience adventure bikes do not work well if you have an inseam much below 32 inches in the same way a Honda Grom does not fit people like me that are taller.
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post #12 of 16 (permalink) Old 5-20-2017, 12:20 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Twowheels View Post
One weird thing I find all boxer engined bikes seem to do is twist(lean) the bike when you rev the engine or step on the throttle, I guess because of the engine orientation. Not a bad thing but something that takes getting used to.
It is sorta weird but I guess having a bit of previous experience on them made it a bit less weird. Guzzis sorta do the same thing. I dunno about the K bikes though. I'm almost positive it is because the crank shaft turns in line with the bike instead of across it like almost every other bike on the planet.
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IMO experience adventure bikes do not work well if you have an inseam much below 32 inches in the same way a Honda Grom does not fit people like me that are taller.
I'm not tall, but I'm not all that "vertically challenged" either. I'm 5'9" but I have somewhat short legs. My inseam is only 31". I can compensate as one of my earlier riding buddies was much shorter than me.

Watching him handle a GSXR1100 in stop and go traffic gave me more than a few pointers on how to manage a taller, heavier bike.

Back to the brakes. BMW is just flat weird. The left side caliper has a normal brake bleeder. The right side.....well...it has some sort of idiotic valve that is capped with a plug.

BMW calls it a grub screw, but I deal with those daily at work. I'd call it a mill plug because it more resembles that, than a grub screw.

Anyway, this stupid valve BMW has on the right front caliper, has a special note in the BMW maintenance manual.

It says "BMW wants you to remove the grub screw and insert a bleeder screw to bleed the brakes. Once complete, remove the bleeder screw and reinstall the grub screw."

Uhhhhh, what? There is a check ball in the bottom of the valve. Once you screw the bleeder in, fluid comes out immediately. It stops when you back the bleeder out far enough that the check ball is not depressed.

REALLY? Really BMW? Do you have to be different just because? How idiotic is that? Install a valve to make a bleeder work exactly opposite of what it normally does WHEN YOU HAVE A NORMAL FUNCTIONING BLEEDER ON THE OTHER SIDE!!!!

To top that off, a standard automotive bleeder won't work because the hole is threaded short. Meaning the bleeder "cone" where it would normally seal, contacts the bottom of the valve without contacting the check ball before any of the threads engage.

So, unless you are slightly industrious, you'll end up ordering something made for the job from BMW at a staggering cost I'm sure.

I chucked mine up in my drill press and milled myself a proper fitting bleeder to do the job. It wasn't pretty, but it did get done. Brakes still not exactly where they should be.

I read something about there being bleeders at the ABS solenoids or manifold or whatever. I have to remove the tank again to find them.

So, I gave up for the night, and I'll go back at it tomorrow. AFTER I install my new license plate hanger on the 996.

More later. If I don't end up burning the thing to the ground.....sean


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post #13 of 16 (permalink) Old 5-20-2017, 3:00 PM
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I'm not an expert by any means, and don't want to come off like that, but have owned adventure bikes since 2011, but only been riding since 2009 (not nearly as long as you), so have gotten more used to their handling quirks but am still learning and perfecting my technique. Like falling into turns, a sensation I think all taller bikes have. At this point I'm a bit of a convert as I love the upright ergonomics and slightly longer travel suspension on rough pavement, which there is a lot of where I live, I don't however ride offroad, at least any more than explore a dirt road a couple of times a year.

I'm only an inch taller than you but wear a 32 inseam pants. I can flat foot my Versys or a BMW 1200 or Multistrada 950, I recently road perfectly. It still becomes a bit of an issue trying to back the bike up a slight incline though as I do not have a lot of extra leg to the ground. Just learned over time never to park on a downward incline. With a 32 inch inseam I think part of your issue may be the aftermarket seat you have. Most adv bikes have a seat that is narrow up front so when you move forward you can easily reach the ground. When you move back you've got broad support for your ass. Some like the Versys, even slope the seat forward, so you can move forward at a stop to lower yourself on the bike. If you get a chance, suggest replacing the seat you have with stock seat and seeing what a difference it can make. From what I have read on the Versys forum, the Baldwin seat you have is great for long rides but not so good for other stuff like stop and go traffic or sportier riding.

Riding a lot of tall bikes I've found through trial and mostly error, NEVER apply the front brakes during a slow speed maneuver, or with the handle bars even slightly turned, as it will want to tip the bike, something all bikes do, but the effect is greatly amplified on a taller bike. Dragging the rear brake helps a lot during slow speed maneuvering. The front forks will also want to compress more than normal, in a stop, due to the longer travel suspension in a stop, again rear brake utilization helps a lot with this to stabilize the bike during hard braking.

If you ever get a chance, test ride a MV Agusta Turismo Veloce, it is possibly the best sport adv bike I've ridden to date. The BMW 1000 XR is supposedly very good as well but apparently has some vibration issue. For me at least, the sport / adv category like these bikes offers, is the best compromise of on road handling, small bike agility, and ergonomics as I'm not really an off road rider. With the wider bars and slightly tighter turning radius, I find my Versys is actually more agile in tight maneuvers, than my Ninja 500 ever was although it took me some time to adapt my technique to the slightly different response of a taller bike with a higher center of gravity.

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post #14 of 16 (permalink) Old 5-20-2017, 6:29 PM Thread Starter
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Like falling into turns, a sensation I think all taller bikes have. At this point I'm a bit of a convert as I love the upright ergonomics and slightly longer travel suspension on rough pavement, which there is a lot of where I live, I don't however ride offroad,
The falling into turns isn't really what I experienced with the GS. I mean, it will tip in easily but with a positive counter steer push on the bars, it will snap into a turn as easily as any sports bike I've ever ridden. It's what it does after that that's different.

Might be due to the engine characteristic but in a left turn, it wants to dig deeper and requires a firm-ish opposite push to keep it where you want it. In a right hander, it wants to stand up on the throttle. None of my other rides do that.
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Just learned over time never to park on a downward incline. With a 32 inch inseam I think part of your issue may be the aftermarket seat you have.
Might be a little of that. I already have a technique for dealing with stopping and all that goes along with that. I use the brake to slide forward on the seat and once stopped, I slide over to the left and get my foot on the ground. It not a problem. If I try to get both feet down, I can tip toe both. Easier to just get my left foot down flat.
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From what I have read on the Versys forum, the Baldwin seat you have is great for long rides but not so good for other stuff like stop and go traffic or sportier riding.
I'm not sure, but I think the one on the GS is a Russell. It has a tag on the bottom.

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I'm not really an off road rider. With the wider bars and slightly tighter turning radius, I find my Versys is actually more agile in tight maneuvers, than my Ninja 500 ever was although it took me some time to adapt my technique to the slightly different response of a taller bike with a higher center of gravity.
I am not an off road rider in the least. MTB is as close as I get to that sort of thing. I imagine, I'd possibly take some gravel roads or logging roads without too much of a second thought on the GS.

However, I'm not too fussed with the other aspects of riding it. I mean, I intended to use the GS for mostly mundane kinds of things. Riding to Monterey, or Sacramento, or even to The City. Rides that require lots of interstate time.

I have plenty of sports bikes to keep me entertained otherwise. I don't need the GS, I just decided to ride it for my buddy for the experience.

Color me not a fan of pretty much anything the bike does performance wise. Comfort though, is superb. Which makes it perfect for what I intended to do with it.

I love the comfort. I like the luggage too. Never owned a bike with hard bags. I find it super convenient to have them.

Performance is reasonably good for such a tall and heavy bike. It stops okay. It accelerates okay. It turns okay, better in fact, than one would expect.

While it does pretty much anything you ask of it, I'm not sold on owning a single "adventure" bike as my sole ride.

I love my sports bikes too much for that. All my riding buddies looked at me like I was insane when I told them about riding a GS.

My oldest riding buddy Bill even said he couldn't imagine me on an adventure bike. Then again, he couldn't imagine me on a Harley either!

I enjoy experiencing different bikes. I do however have a standard I expect from any motorcycle. It boils down to just a few things. Does it stop well, does it shift well and does it accelerate well?

Handling is obviously going to vary according to the intended purpose. That, I can deal with but the other three are mandatory. If one of them is off, I've already lost interest.

A final thought, I am coming around to the merits of the big BMW. However, I cannot comprehend the lunacy of some of the things done just to be different.

Maybe hardcore BMW riders accept that, but honestly, I can't. If I had to lay down my own cash for a used bike similar in style to the BMW, I'd probably opt for a Multi Strada. The 2nd generation with the 1100 DS motor.

They're both ugly as all hell, but get the job done in much the same manner. The difference is, the Ducati at least, isn't prone to blowing out brake lines when you need them most.....sean


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post #15 of 16 (permalink) Old 5-20-2017, 10:56 PM Thread Starter
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I managed to not burn the BMW to the ground. I was sorely tempted though.

It would seem that the article I read claiming that GSs equipped with BMWs ABS II did not need to be bled at the ABS manifold is false.

I read elsewhere that all of them have to be bled at the ABS manifold FIRST, before bleeding at the wheel caliper.

It took a second to locate the bleeder for the front ABS circuit. The article I read stated it was the left of the two bleeders. It is not. Unless the writer referenced the left side as the side to his left when standing in front of the bike he was working on.

The right one of the two bleeders is for the front circuit. Once bled, I enlisted the help of one of my kids buddies to work the lever while I bled the calipers.

The left one went swimmingly. The right side one, with the stupid valve fought every step of the way once again.

Got it bled though, and while the lever feel is not the same as it is on any of the other bikes that inhabit my garage, it is at least consistent now. Firm lever feel at about 1/2 distance to the bar with the adjuster at position 4.

It does not change with repeated application either so that's a good sign the air has been bled out. Now I still have to do the rear, which will once again necessitate tank removal. I may as well do that tomorrow and get it over with.

I did get the new billet license plate relocator installed on the 996. I'd fabricated one that mounted to the existing bolt hole for the stock one. THAT didn't work out so well.

One really whopping great bump in the road and the suspension compressed enough to find the plate and shove it into the rear tire. Which promptly slammed it flat against the bottom of the tail.

The new relocator moves the plate rear ward and upward towards the exhausts. Cleans up the rear nicely though. More later.......sean


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post #16 of 16 (permalink) Old Today, 1:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Twowheels View Post
If you ever get a chance, test ride a MV Agusta Turismo Veloce, it is possibly the best sport adv bike I've ridden to date.
(imagine picture of me on my new bike here)

While I do agree the Turismo Veloce is an amazing bike (I should, I bought one), I would hardly call it an adventure bike. The closest it gets to adventure is the wannabe skid plate, and the scorpion trail tires it comes equipped with.

Maybe it is just me, but I have no plans to ride mine off road, EVER. It rides like a sport bike with touring ergonomics. It meets Sean's list and exceeds it too. It accelerates quite well, it shifts great, it even have a quick shifter for clutch free up and down shifts, and it stops fantastically. It also turns quite well to boot.

It does take a while to get used to such a tall bike, as it does fall into the turns. However, it doesn't have the handling quirks Sean doesn't like about the GS. It will hold a line through a turn, and responds just as you expect it to inputs on the bars or body weight shifts.


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