Giving it a shot - Ex-500.com - The home of the Kawasaki EX500 / Ninja 500R
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post #1 of 43 (permalink) Old 6-23-2019, 2:45 PM Thread Starter
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Giving it a shot


New bt45 on hand.
Need to find out once and for all how hard or easy doing my own tire change is. Tire is date coded 0719, so I like that. Also have a chain and sprocket kit ready to go at the same time.

Probably be 2 or 3 months before I get to this, but will let you know how it goes.

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2006 Ninja500R Purchased new July 2006; 0 miles. Miles as of January 2019; 102,137. It's a GO bike, not a SHOW bike.
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post #2 of 43 (permalink) Old 6-23-2019, 2:49 PM
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What tire changing equipment do you have?

In the middle of a chain and sprocket change myself right now. Taking my time over accurately setting the master rivet ink, and not using the awful clip link.

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post #3 of 43 (permalink) Old 6-23-2019, 2:55 PM Thread Starter
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Planning on using regular mc tire irons, I have 3 of them. And of coarse tire lube.

2006 Ninja500R Purchased new July 2006; 0 miles. Miles as of January 2019; 102,137. It's a GO bike, not a SHOW bike.
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post #4 of 43 (permalink) Old 6-23-2019, 3:05 PM
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It's not that difficult. The first bead will go on relatively easily. The second will be slightly more challenging. The key is, whatever point you start spooning from, make sure the opposite side is tucked into the drop center of the rim. That means, when you spoon on the second bead, BOTH beads need to be in the drop center on the opposite side. Otherwise it's virtually impossible to stretch the tire onto the rim.
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post #5 of 43 (permalink) Old 6-23-2019, 3:05 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Davenay67 View Post
What tire changing equipment do you have?
But I also have this if needed.
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post #6 of 43 (permalink) Old 6-23-2019, 4:01 PM
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You'll need the canned product, and an assistant, a 2nd set of hands is helpful, working (holding, stabilizing) opposite side to you.

I've found the older the tire you are removing, the tougher the job. You may recall an older thread I posted (you were commenting within) regarding removing very old factory original tires, finally resorting to using a zip tool to cut the innermost section of bead. Impossible to remove even with 2 of us wrestling the damn thing. Installation of new Michelin was a breeze.

Good luck, have fun, get an assistant.

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post #7 of 43 (permalink) Old 6-23-2019, 4:39 PM Thread Starter
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Oh yeah, I remember the other thread.

The bad news is I will be flying solo, no assistant.
The good news is the tire is not old at all.

2006 Ninja500R Purchased new July 2006; 0 miles. Miles as of January 2019; 102,137. It's a GO bike, not a SHOW bike.
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post #8 of 43 (permalink) Old 6-23-2019, 11:19 PM
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It isn't that difficult. Use a good tire lube, and not dish soap. I use a 5 gallon pail to hold the wheel up while I'm spooning a tire on and off. Keeps the rim from getting trashed. Also, gravity is your friend when mounting a tire. If you choose to work with it rather than against it.



I did all of mine solo. No one around to help. Breaking the bead is the hardest part to me.



Quote:
Taking my time over accurately setting the master rivet ink, and not using the awful clip link.

I don't know how many times this discussion needs to take place. There is NOTHING wrong with a properly installed clip link. I've run them for decades and NEVER had one fail. NEVER. They are not awful, they work quite well.



The thing is, you need virtually the same equipment to install either one. The link must be pressed together before installing the clip, and it must be pressed together before peening the rivet pins. Either way, you need a chain press.



I've done this in the past using a C-clamp and some flat stock but I finally just broke down and bought a whole kit. Now I can use either.



If you were to use a clip link, make sure you press the link together, then install the clip so the open end is facing away from the direction of travel.



Do both those things and you'll never have an issue with a clip link failing. As stated, I ran them for decades and never lost a clip, never had a link fail. Then again, I take good care of my chains and inspect them closely every 500 to 1000 miles.....sean


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post #9 of 43 (permalink) Old 6-24-2019, 12:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Apriliarider View Post

....

I don't know how many times this discussion needs to take place. There is NOTHING wrong with a properly installed clip link. I've run them for decades and NEVER had one fail. NEVER. They are not awful, they work quite well.

....
No discussion required. I've had a chain (with clip link) let go and fly off before. I'm not looking to change your mind, you won't change mine either.

Just stating my personal preference.....

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post #10 of 43 (permalink) Old 6-24-2019, 8:23 AM
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I love my NoMar motorcycle tire changer! This thing rocks! Dismount and mount your tires within minutes.


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post #11 of 43 (permalink) Old 6-24-2019, 9:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Apriliarider View Post
It isn't that difficult. Use a good tire lube, and not dish soap. I use a 5 gallon pail to hold the wheel up while I'm spooning a tire on and off. Keeps the rim from getting trashed. Also, gravity is your friend when mounting a tire. If you choose to work with it rather than against it.
I did all of mine solo. No one around to help. Breaking the bead is the hardest part to me.
Sean, I'd swear you've posted in the past that you own an actual tire machine of some sorts, correct?
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Last edited by ducatiman; 6-24-2019 at 9:45 AM.
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post #12 of 43 (permalink) Old 6-24-2019, 9:22 AM
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I cannot stress how much sunlight will help you mount the tire. Getting heat into the new tire will save you a huge amount of time and energy. Put the tires in direct sunlight 4-6 hours before attempting to mount them.
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post #13 of 43 (permalink) Old 6-24-2019, 4:36 PM
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Harbor fraight has a bead breaker for $50 and a MC tire holder attachment for antother $50, I have the bead breaker and did the 500 with a little bit of elbow greese.

I use a hair drier in the new tire on high to heat it up prior to install (NJ basement in January).

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post #14 of 43 (permalink) Old 6-24-2019, 5:51 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Devilsfan View Post
I love my NoMar motorcycle tire changer! This thing rocks! Dismount and mount your tires within minutes.

Yeah yeah yeah, I know all about your killer tire changer.
I'm going to have to give it a go Redneck Style .

Quote:
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I cannot stress how much sunlight will help you mount the tire. Getting heat into the new tire will save you a huge amount of time and energy. Put the tires in direct sunlight 4-6 hours before attempting to mount them.
My problem is I'm a morning person.
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Last edited by bpe; 6-24-2019 at 5:55 PM. Reason: I messed up the whole thing
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post #15 of 43 (permalink) Old 6-24-2019, 7:43 PM
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Sean, I'd swear you've posted in the past that you own an actual tire machine of some sorts, correct?
Yes he does. It's honestly been used to change my tires more than anyone else's in the last 3 years or so.

It's a great machine. Makes tire swaps relatively painless. I may buy one myself some day.

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post #16 of 43 (permalink) Old 6-24-2019, 9:32 PM
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Sean, I'd swear you've posted in the past that you own an actual tire machine of some sorts, correct?
As Saabnut points out, yes, I do have a No-Mar machine. However, before I got the machine, I'd do tires the old fashioned way, with spoons and a 5 gallon pail.



Sometimes, I'd use a big C clamp to hold the opposite side of the tire in the drop center to make life easier. That negated the need for a second set of hands on most jobs.



Try spooning on 190/50 Bridgestone by hand. Stiffest carcass there is, and on tires that wide, almost impossible to get the side walls to drop into the center drop. Made for some serious sweat, cursing and yelling...and a BFH. I know, last resort and all that. I did get that tire on though. Michelin.....easy as pie. And I LAHK PIE!


Seriously though, it is a world of difference mounting up a Michelin versus any Bridgestone. Not only are they lighter, they're softer too. Somehow though, they still manage to last a long time. I'm for sure past due for a new set of Pilot Roads on my Aprilia but the ones that have been on there since like 2012 are still going strong. Maybe a new set of Road 5s in the cards....actually, there is, no maybe about it. Just wanna get done spending money on the PSS first.........sean


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post #17 of 43 (permalink) Old 6-25-2019, 8:58 AM
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And I second John Z...put that thing in the sun for a while!

I've posted my NoMar experience and I think the Dismounting bar is a big key to getting the tire on and off. (You can buy those separately from the company).

Don't want to get into a tire argument here but don't count out the Shinko's! I put a Raven 009 on the Versys before I traded it. I wanted a more sporty tire as opposed to a 40/60 type. Had about 1500 miles on it and they were nice! And...$92 + tax at Cycle Gear!!! I'm hearing awesome reviews on the PR5's in handling but I've also heard that they're wearing just the same as some of the others.
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post #18 of 43 (permalink) Old 6-25-2019, 11:49 PM
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Don't want to get into a tire argument here but don't count out the Shinko's! I put a Raven 009 on the Versys before I traded it. I wanted a more sporty tire as opposed to a 40/60 type. Had about 1500 miles on it and they were nice! And...$92 + tax at Cycle Gear!!! I'm hearing awesome reviews on the PR5's in handling but I've also heard that they're wearing just the same as some of the others.

I haven't ridden a set of the newer Shinko's yet. Way back, when I first started riding sports bikes, some of the younger guys in the barracks would get them. They didn't grip for F&$K all but they lasted a long time. That was then.



Now one of my oldest riding buddies uses them all the time. He goes through tires like crazy so he started using Shinko's. He says they're great tires for the money and he's never run out of grip. This from a guy I have ridden literal thousands of miles with. I'd trust his opinion over anyone else's any day.



As for the PR5s, I just got back from a weekend with the West Coast Ducati contingent from another forum. Several of them were running PR5s including my neighbor for the weekend who had them mounted on Multistrada he'd ridden down from Washington.



They looked like they were new, so I asked when he had them mounted. He told me they had several thousand miles on them already. Seriously, they looked brand spankin' new after 3000 plus miles.



My riding buddy who is using Shinko's now used to get upwards of 12K out a rear PR2 and then the PR3 before he switched to Shinko. He told me he still gets around 10K out a rear but for around half the price. That's pretty good advertising for Shinko in my mind.



Still....I won't adorn my Ducati's or my Aprilia with them. I'm planning on Michelins for them all as those seem to give the best feel and feed back to me. I ain't concerned too much about mileage on those bikes. They don't accrue enough to wear through the tire before the tire is too old to keep using.....sean
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post #19 of 43 (permalink) Old 6-26-2019, 11:39 AM
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I recently went through the same process. I went to a local shop to check on pricing for tire changing. It would have been $85 a tire. After alot of searching I went to good ol Amazon and ordered:
ALPHA MOTO Portable Motorcycle Wheel Balancer Tire Truing Stand Max 10" Rim Width
Motion Pro 08-0455 Black Steel Wheel Weight
Motion Pro 08-0536 BeadPro Forged Steel Tire Bead Breaker and Lever Tool Set(the long one is steel short is aluminum)

I made my own rim protectors by cutting the lip off of an old plastic garbage can. Saw this on youtube.
I mixed my own lube using water and glycerine.
I used a 5 gal bucket to work on.
I had a couple of old tire spoons which helped.

I looked in the forum, and found some great tips and tricks, watched a couple of youtube videos then changed the front and rear tires. This setup worked great for me.
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post #20 of 43 (permalink) Old 6-26-2019, 12:57 PM
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I've been doing my own for over 50 years on a 5 gal bucket. I use Gojo original formula (i.e. no pumice) for the lube, a big rubber hammer to "encourage" things when necessary, and don't have a clue what the local shop charges because I've never asked.

My only real technical advantage is the pair of Dowidat 38-8 irons that I bought on the advice of a mentor back when I was a young punk. ("Here kid; buy a pair these and you'll be good for the rest of your life.") If you are lucky enough to find a pair on ebay, grab them. You won't be disappointed. They are superior to anything else I have ever seen. I think the company went out of business decades ago.
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post #21 of 43 (permalink) Old 6-26-2019, 1:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Devilsfan View Post
And I second John Z...put that thing in the sun for a while!

I've posted my NoMar experience and I think the Dismounting bar is a big key to getting the tire on and off. (You can buy those separately from the company).

Don't want to get into a tire argument here but don't count out the Shinko's! I put a Raven 009 on the Versys before I traded it. I wanted a more sporty tire as opposed to a 40/60 type. Had about 1500 miles on it and they were nice! And...$92 + tax at Cycle Gear!!! I'm hearing awesome reviews on the PR5's in handling but I've also heard that they're wearing just the same as some of the others.
A good mounting bar certainly makes the job a lot more pleasant. I bought a hybrid bar (No Mar demount tip and Mojo Lever mounting end) from a guy on a Suzuki forum a few years back. Works like a champ.

I also have the HF setup; car tire base and motorcycle tire upper. Worked OK as it comes out of the box, but was always paranoid about scratching rims. Mojo Blocks help hold the tire much better and remove the risk of scratching. The blocks and the mounting bar take the HF setup from blah to awesome.

I'd rather have the full No Mar rig if money were no object, but the modified HF setup certainly does a great job for a fraction of the cost.


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2003 Honda Goldwing
2001 Honda VFR 800
2000 Kawasaki KDX 200
1999 Ducati 996 BiPosto

Last edited by Davenay67; 6-26-2019 at 1:38 PM.
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post #22 of 43 (permalink) Old 6-27-2019, 8:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Davenay67 View Post
A good mounting bar certainly makes the job a lot more pleasant. I bought a hybrid bar (No Mar demount tip and Mojo Lever mounting end) from a guy on a Suzuki forum a few years back. Works like a champ...

...I'd rather have the full No Mar rig if money were no object, but the modified HF setup certainly does a great job for a fraction of the cost.



Hey, whatever works is all that matters!!! I love the NoMar and I know it's expensive but the way I saw it, it's a keeper for a long time. Plus, now that I'm into the "faster" bikes I'm probably going to be changing tires a lot more. I used to ride cruisers for years and those tires would generally last a pretty long time. Not so much on these lighter, faster, quicker bikes.
And now that I have this Honda CB...I have a feeling I'm going to be changing rear tires rather regularly!
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post #23 of 43 (permalink) Old 6-28-2019, 12:38 PM
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Man those NoMars look nice. I actually just changed the rear this weekend. I just use three long spoons (14.5") and two 2x6s instead of bucket and some lube. Even taking my time to be super careful of the rim, I can probably get it on/off in 30 mins each. Then I just use the axle and some car jacks to balance using Harbor Freight 1/4 oz weights. Its not perfect, but it's better than nothing.

Everything mentioned here is, as always, great advise. Getting it warm first does wonders for sure.

For others that are looking to do this for the first time MC Garage has a great change and balance how to video:

I also just discovered this zip tie method...haven't tried it, but it is very interesting to say the least:
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post #24 of 43 (permalink) Old 6-29-2019, 7:37 AM
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What tire changing equipment do you have?
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post #25 of 43 (permalink) Old 6-29-2019, 8:06 AM Thread Starter
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Planning on using regular mc tire irons, I have 3 of them. And of coarse tire lube.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bpe View Post
But I also have this if needed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by martinbrown9899 View Post
What tire changing equipment do you have?

2006 Ninja500R Purchased new July 2006; 0 miles. Miles as of January 2019; 102,137. It's a GO bike, not a SHOW bike.
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