Project Super Sport or the PSS thread - Page 2 - Ex-500.com - The home of the Kawasaki EX500 / Ninja 500R
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post #26 of 47 (permalink) Old 10-15-2018, 1:09 PM Thread Starter
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Monday Update 15 October 2018

This weekend did not go as planned. Not really anyway. Saturday was a beautiful day. I got out to the garage early and got down to work.



Got a bunch more metal cut and welded up a fixture to my metal saw horse to mount the Super Sport frame up for a nice solid and stable platform to do the remaining work on it.



Then I got the metal prepped for the bike bench I've been working on, and welded that all up. It's about 90% complete now so I can actually begin using it.



There are a couple more pieces of metal to cut and weld in, but they are bracing parts to ensure the stability of the bench with the weight of a bike on it.



As I am working on a partial bike right now, it is sufficient as is to support that amount of weight. I did receive quite few parts, including getting the carbs back from @ducatiman.



Here is what I would like the rest of the forum to know about that:



1st off, I am VERY picky when it comes to letting ANYONE work on my stuff. As I am a mechanic, I've developed the skills to do all of my own work. When it comes to certain things, I prefer to have someone with specialized knowledge and equipment do the work.



I've been burned a time or two with that part and I figure, if I want something screwed up, I can do that just fine on my own, I don't need to spend money on it. That, and the experience of screwing it up in the first place teaches me the right way to do it.



2nd, I want someone with an eye for detail working on my stuff. I don't care if I pay a little more for that, as the old axiom about getting what you pay for is never more applicable than with highly skilled, detail oriented work.



@ducatiman delivers on all of the above. I'd seen pictures of his work on this forum, as well as detailed descriptions of it.



The experience of working with him mirrors that exactly. I showed my wife the carbs and her response was "those look brand new!" which was my reaction when I saw the pics on the comments thread.



What forum members....or even non-members who read this thread should remember most is, if you need the work done, contact @ducatiman either through this forum or on his website Custom Carb Services.



If you are as picky as I am about your carbs, you will not be disappointed. If you aren't that picky....you still won't be, but probably won't be as impressed as I am. Thanks to @ducatiman, it was a great experience working with you and I hope I was a good customer.



Other parts that arrived around the same time were the steering head bearings from Rock Auto, a new to me OEM left handle bar to replace the original one with "bent patina" and the fore mentioned swing arm bearings and seals...which I have to pick up this morning.


While I still need to order brake rebuild kits, I also ordered a liter of ATE Super Blue brake fluid, some ATE assembly fluid and picked up some clear Tygon brake hose. Once done, the clear tube with the blue fluid should make for a nice mechanical visual as it feeds the rear brake master cylinder. I'd love to do the same for the front brakes and clutch but as they are "coffin" style there is no remote reservoir or feed hose.



I finally decided upon the color, and by that I mean the EXACT color and dropped by my local ACE Hardware and ordered a quart of House of Kolor paint along with the appropriate reducer.



Really, the bill was quite a bit less than I was expecting...it is House of Kolor paint after all, but since I went with a "stock" color rather than a custom mix, it was very reasonable.



By comparison, a quart of the proper color from Color Rite was $199 AND you needed the proper base coat to make it come out right. That base coat is, as you may have guessed, another $199. That is without reducer, or clear coat.



My bill right now, without clear coat or primer (no base coat required) is around half of that.



Wish I had more pictures to fill out this part of the build but as I've done more research and buying than assembling, there isn't much to take pictures of. More later..........sean


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post #27 of 47 (permalink) Old 10-16-2018, 9:01 PM Thread Starter
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Update, Tuesday 16 October 2018

My apologies for the lack of pictures once again. This is more of a research update.



As I've noted previously, I've spent a good deal more time just researching things for the PSS than I have for some college classes. This isn't because I don't know anything about the 900 Super Sport but rather, I know how much I don't know when it comes down to small and (some find insignificant) tedious details.



This is first and foremost a resto-mod. That really means that there are details that don't need to be on the money exact. Like really, who cares if I use all the exact replacement rubber well nuts? No one is going to see them, right? Right.



I'm not going that in depth. In fact, for weight savings, I'll probably replace a number of the well nuts with aluminum clip nuts where that is a reasonable solution.



No, the things I've been researching are so basic, and so simple one would think that no research needs doing. That would be a mistake. Given what is at stake, possibly a mistake of epic proportion.



I've written previously about replacing all the bearings on the PSS. I found this to be a far bigger deal than I'd ever reasonably expected. In my last update, I wrote about finding the steering head bearings were in fact, also used as rear wheel bearings on a Fiat 500 from the mid 1950s.



As it turned out, that was only the beginning. Seems that not only are bearings not created equally, even the brand name can be suspect once you start digging into the details.



Wheel bearings are significant because they are what connect your motorcycle to the wheels. If they fail, you can end up on your head, injured or worse. So, I don't take the choice of those lightly.



Ordinarily, I'd have simply bought all SKF bearings and been done with it. SKF is a reputable company, right? Well, they are. But that doesn't have so much to do with the quality of the bearings they put their name on.



Case in point: the rear wheel bearings for the PSS are extra wide, 17mm X 40mm X 16mm. The exact description is, double sealed, angular contact ball bearing. In this case, SKF part number 62203 2RS C1. According to the SKF catalog, this particular bearing is rated at 12K rpm and is a "normal" clearance bearing.



While I was researching this bearing, I discovered that Timken, a US company makes the exact same bearing but with a 20K rpm rating. This, based on the grease used in the sealed bearing.



So I wondered, what the major difference was between the SKF bearing and the Timken bearing. Quality apparently and the type grease used. According the information available online, SKF uses a lithium grease. Lithium? Really? Not a moly grease or synthetic? You know, grease designed to used in a high speed bearing?


More research followed. This brought me to an article about bearing companies. The 5 "best" bearing companies in the world are NTN, NSK (both from Japan) Shaeffler (makes F.A.G., INA and several others in Germany, Austria and other European countries) SKF, and Timken. Then I found a couple other companies with dubious origins. OSO (made in Turkey) VBX (house brand made in Russia but carries Japanese brands) and of course, everyone's favorite All Balls.



Nothing against All Balls. Made in China, to ISO standards and uses a high quality grease in their sealed bearings. I just didn't want the cheapest way out. I want the cheapest, but highest quality stuff I can buy. I'm not rich, but if I have to pay just a little more to get the quality I'm after, I don't have an issue with that.



So, I ended up doing a load more research and found a US company called Berliss. They're in New Jersey and have been making bearings for 4 generations as a family business. Full Stop. THAT is the kind of business I WANT to support. Turns out, they make high precision bearings for electric motors. High RPM motors at that.



They also make the same bearing required for my front wheel. Unfortunately, I didn't find whether or not they made one for the rear wheel, or the cush drive as I'd already ordered the cush drive bearings from INA.



I placed an order for the front wheel bearings from Berliss. Now I'm wondering if they make that extra wide bearing for my rear wheel also. I hope so. I'm tired of researching something so simple. Even the paint was easier.........sean


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post #28 of 47 (permalink) Old 10-20-2018, 8:20 PM Thread Starter
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Update, Saturday 20 October 2018

Productive day today, despite watching MotoGP Qualifying all morning. Got out to the garage and degreased the oily parts of the frame. That was a significant bit of work as the leaking forks, engine and shock oiled down almost the entire thing.


Then I degreased the sprocket carrier. That was a full hour of scrubbing with a toothbrush and 2 cups of mineral spirits. I thought to stop and take a pic just after I started:



And once I finished with the mineral spirits:

I wanted to get more pics in, as no build thread is interesting without them.



The reason I went ahead and did the sprocket carrier is that I received the bearings for it yesterday. So, no excuses now. Time to start building. Now that the carrier is cleaned up, I'll press the bearings in tomorrow and get it ready to go on the rear wheel when that is done.



I've taken stock of what parts I have, and where I am with things and it appears my major hold up is now the frame. So, that means I have to get the metal work done, clean the frame up with some simple green and get it ready for primer and paint.



I'll get the steering stem bearing installed, and then it's down to when the paint is completed so I can install the steering head bearings and triple clamp. Still have the valve check to do, and install the new belts. Degrease of the engine will have to happen before then though.



I also managed to degrease the front brake calipers. They were almost as nasty as the sprocket carrier due to all the suspension fluid that was leaking on them. I'll be rebuilding them completely but that will wait as I feel I have set enough goals to complete before mid November.



I'm going on vacation to Monterey again at the end of the month though, so I gotta get as much done as I can before then...........sean


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post #29 of 47 (permalink) Old 10-28-2018, 12:54 AM Thread Starter
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Update, 27 October 2018

Just a short update on the little bit of progress made today. Finished up with the frame prep today. All the welds that need to be ground off are ground off. Metal removed and ready for install of new metal parts and welding repairs.



Along with that, I did manage to press in the new bearing into the sprocket carrier. That was actually easily done with an Arbor Press I bought years ago. 1st time I've ever used it for what it was intended for.



Also took a long hard look at the tank today. Not really what I needed to get done but something I'd been meaning to take a look at. The sorta interesting thing about the 900 Super Sport tank is, the fill cap is mounted to a base or carrier. Once the fill cap is off, the base can be removed from the tank too.



Ducati did this because the old carbureted 900 Super Sports have a filter and pump inside that have to be serviced. I took one look at the tank and thought, well....this isn't going to be easy.



The tank was painted and not prepped particularly well. Likely also that the individual painting the tank was not familiar in the least with its construction. The fuel cap base is sealed both with a Viton o-ring as well as a weather seal. The weather seal was completely painted over as was the fill cap base.



When I removed the grub screws from the base and pulled up to remove it, it didn't want to move. The paint was so thick and applied over the base that it wasn't coming up. After some forceful movement and lots of curse words, it finally broke free of the paint and slid out.






As you can see, it leaves a nice large hole for pump and filter removal, as well as access to any minor dents made in the top of the tank.






The filter and pump inside the tank, visible here; you can see the filter which was probably white at one time, is now a deep tan color from submersion in fuel for the last 25 years.



I don't think it's been changed, probably ever. Maybe @ducatiman will chime in on the comments thread about it. I don't know what the factory stuff looked like so I might be wrong on the whole OEM original fitting of it.



After about a half hour of scrubbing, chipping and scraping I finally managed to remove all the paint from both the fill cap base and the weather seal:



More to follow....depending upon progress or lack there of over the next couple of days. Then I'm off to Monterey so nothing will get done.......sean


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post #30 of 47 (permalink) Old 11-12-2018, 3:32 PM Thread Starter
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Update, Monday 12 November 2018

Precious little work got done on the PSS this weekend. Despite being a long weekend for me, I got little accomplished.



I'm going to head out to my garage soon and see if I can get a bit more done but this is the limited progress so far.



I ordered new rubber mounts for the carbs so beautifully prepared by @ducatiman. I figured as nice as they came out, they deserved a better home than the old sodden rubber boots.



Saturday, small but significant progress was made. I removed the old fuel filter and pump from the tank. I've sourced a new pump from Amazon, but have not ordered it as yet. Filter seems like a generic G2 or G8 Fram item. I've seen where the metal Napa version is preferred so I'll probably go that route.



Whilest removing the pump, my sleeve caught on a shard of the nasty paint that covered the tank. It popped off a nickel or quarter sized chunk. That gave me pause to change direction for the day.



To be honest, I did not look forward to sanding or grinding off all that paint. It is unnecessarily thick, brittle and the surface below was poorly prepped.



When that chunk popped off, I thought; "well, it has to be done anyway" and took a hook scribe to it to see what would happen. In 5 minutes I'd removed a fairly big chunk of paint as it seemed to just pop off in dime sized chunks every time I prodded with the scribe.



In about an hour, I'd cleared the entire top of the tank down to the original paint below.



This is when I discovered the OEM AGIP decal that normally resides on the top of the tank, forward of the fuel filler had been ground off. Down to the bare metal below.



When I moved to the tank sides, I discovered the same had been done to the OEM Ducati logos. Down to bare metal.



Before I did that, I noted that a previous owner (not the guy I got it from) had adorned the tank with 1980s Ducati logos. The gum residue still clearly visible on the nasty paint.



Here are some pics, followed by my thoughts on the refinish that I removed.

This area is the forward (front) of the tank, just above where the clamp secures to it.



What you see are two different finishes. The darker of the two reds is the OEM Ducati red.



The darker cherry red looking stuff that is everywhere is some sort of adhesion promoter or self etching primer.I can't decide which.



It wipes off with lacquer thinner with a tad bit of elbow grease. That makes me think more an adhesion promoter.



The lighter of the two reds is the re-spray work. It is garbage. It was filled with sags, solvent pop and was way, way over done. It was so thick...6 mils or better. Honestly, that's not an exaggeration.



Another view of the same spot, just zoomed out a little.



If you look to the top right area of the pic, you can see a short demarcation line where the finish underneath gives way to the adhesion promoter and then the red primer before the finish paint.
As you can see, there is adhesion promoter covering the entire tank. There was a layer of red primer over this. One reason I've decided as I type this that is in fact adhesion promoter.

This is the side of the tank where the Ducati logo used to be. Like I wrote previously, ground down to bare metal.



Here is where it gets interesting though. If you look closely, you'll see a white primer base, followed by a yellow and then a red. The red is OEM Ducati red.



I don't know about the yellow. It appears it may be primer....but why would you use a yellow primer and not a red primer? Besides, there is a white primer below that.



I don't know, but I have some suspicions. I've emailed Ducati Italy regarding the VIN and what it was configured as when it left the factory.



So, now that the tank is essentially stripped of the shitty paint it came to me wearing, I can actually begin block sanding and getting it ready for the new paint.



I'm going to wipe it down thoroughly with lacquer thinner first so that I get as much of that crappy adhesion promoter off before I begin block sanding.



Further, there is a minor ding in the top right side of the tank....debating trying to bump that out before hand or just put some filler over it and press on.



It's minor and I don't want to risk damaging the tank for something so small. If it bugs me enough, I'll try to bump it out. Otherwise, a bit of filler and primer.



More as I find time to get stuff done........sean


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post #31 of 47 (permalink) Old 11-23-2018, 8:34 PM Thread Starter
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Not much of an update. Just a pic I forgot to add when I posted pics of the fuel cap carrier. The point of the pic is that you can see at the bottom of the pic, the paint that was super thick and had adhered to the cap carrier weather strip. That's it. More later....maybe.....sean



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post #32 of 47 (permalink) Old 11-24-2018, 9:27 PM Thread Starter
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More forgotten images

I meant to post these up before, but somehow forgot about them.



I had to replace my steering head bearings because the lower bearing was completely shot. It looked like it had been greased at some point but did not look like it had ever been removed.

The roller cone was rusted all to hell while the cup was damaged and needed a replacement. There were divots in the race where the roller bearings ground notches into it.

I don't know if this was caused by the rust becoming a grit in the bearing grease or simply because the bearing does not turn a great deal to redistribute the load placed on it.


These were both the lower bearing halves on the steering stem.



This is an image of the frame where the engine bolts to it. The paint that can be seen on the frame tube is what one hack previous owner left when they painted the engine while it was in the frame. Shoddy huh?



The flat piece of metal with the two holes is where the fairing mount bolts to the frame.



Note the bent metal and if you look really close, there is a crack between the two holes. Both of these things represent damage left behind when the bike was dropped on that particular side.



Note also that both sides were bent with a crack between the two bolt holes. As this is essentially impossible to repair, it must be replaced with new metal.



I have cut that metal, and is what I have previously referred to as the flat metal parts. They are still raw though, and have not been drilled or made ready to weld.



Only progress made this weekend is that I managed to get the front wheel stripped of paint on the machined lip. It is ready for polish and a fresh coat of matte gold paint.



I used the bristle discs I mentioned in the tool thread and they work like gang busters on the wheel paint and the extra thick primer under it.



The awesome thing is, the bristle discs don't remove any metal. Once through the paint, the surface is burnished slightly but there is no removal of metal like a scotchbrite pad leaves in its wake. More later...with pics.......sean


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post #33 of 47 (permalink) Old 12-1-2018, 6:30 PM Thread Starter
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Swingarm update: December 1st, 2018

Picked up the swingarm from my welder today. As previously mentioned in the comments thread, he did a fantastic job. Not just on the crack but also on the damage from the extra long exhaust bolts rubbing on it as it traveled up and down.



I took a couple of pics to show what things look like now compared to before.



Swingarm pivot before:


After:




Before:




After:




Before:


After:


Unfortunately, I did not take a before picture of the other side. However it was almost as bad as the one above before the repair. Here it is after the repair and some sanding/polishing by me today:

And a halfway sorta pic, showing the difference before polish and after (the swingarm was bead blasted before the repairs were attempted):



Polished part to the left, prepped but not polished to the right. Some may also have noticed the swingarm lift spool bungs that were also welded on during the process. So, the repairs are complete, and I have the remaining polishing to complete, as well as finish up with the front wheel lip.



In other aspects of the project, I ordered a new billet key-less fuel cap from eBay. It arrived this past week from a company here in CA called Bob Moto.



I think it looks quite good, if not as good as the Vortex key-less cap on my 996. I think it will set things off nicely in the tank department. More later as things develop......sean


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post #34 of 47 (permalink) Old 12-10-2018, 8:23 PM Thread Starter
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Update 10 December 2018

Not much to update really. I got the tank sanded and ready for prep.



I cleaned up the fuel filler carrier and got it nice and clean. Installed the new filler cap in it just to see how it looked: Before




After:



I did not take any pictures of the sanded tank. However, the tank has a couple of rubber cushions that sit on the upper frame tubes.



The last, sad attempt at a paint job, whomever prepped the bike for paint neglected to remove them. So, they were painted red along with the rest of the tank.


Here they are. I cleaned the upper one up and rubbed in some silicone grease to get the rubber pliable again. It was pretty dried out and stiff. The lower one is as it was removed for comparison.




As for the rest of the work, I'm still polishing the wheel. I am also still polishing the swingarm. Of the two, the swingarm is nearly completed while the wheel is about 3/4ths done.



I've decided that I am going to polish the machine finished portions of the swing arm and just paint the cast sections with silver wheel paint. That should keep it looking similar to stock....other than the polished portions.



Once I complete the polish on the wheel, I'm planning on the same sorta thing. The center cast portion I'm going to paint gold with the same brand wheel paint.



I'll post an update once either one is done, complete with the before and after pics..........sean


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post #35 of 47 (permalink) Old 12-31-2018, 9:15 PM Thread Starter
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Update, Monday 31 December 2018

As mentioned in my last post to the comment thread, I did actually get quite a lot done this holiday season.



I took vacation from work for 2 weeks so I could relax and get stuff done...well...then I got sick right before vacation.



Anyway, a day or so after Christmas I got out in the garage and got busy. I welded up the frame and got all the repairs done to it.



Today I got all the slag and spatter cleaned up as well as skim coated the dent repair I made to the tank.



I also got that block sanded back this after noon.



Also spent a good deal of time with the polisher on the swing arm. It's still not done. However, it is close so I can put a pic up.



Started sanding on the frame too so I can get primer on it and get it painted. Enough blah blah...pics:



Tank after rough sanding








After welding the nail and pulling the dent:





Ground off the welds:



Skim coated with filler:



Spot painted with primer after block sanding:




Frame lug welded on:

More later.........sean


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post #36 of 47 (permalink) Old 1-1-2019, 11:24 AM Thread Starter
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January 1, 2019 (update continuation from 31 Dec)

Yesterday I left off with a pic of the lug welded on the rear of the frame.



What this actually does is hold the lock set and mount for the seat to the frame.



The previous "repair" was poorly executed with the lug welded on poorly, as well as the lug being fabricated too short for the application, and threaded with a larger diameter thread than the original.



What that meant was there were 2 different sized bolts holding it on. Meaning it took 2 different tools to remove it. Piss poor workmanship right there.



As that is now corrected, I can press ahead with sanding and painting the frame. That is the last step before I start assembly.


At least for the frame mounted stuff. Have no illusions folks, that is simply the first major hurdle to be surmounted. There are more to follow.



Today's follow up pics:

The swing arm is nearly polished to the extent that I wish. All the polished areas will get masked off and the remainder painted silver. I don't see a point in polishing the parts no one will see. It is not easy and is very time consuming.






If you are wondering what the hell that is in the above pic, I purposely left the scale and perspective out to illustrate something.



What you are seeing is the right side tail section. The sole purpose of this pic is to illustrate just what I'm dealing with on the paint.



You can see how thick the stuff is. The lighter red being the shitty paint I'm trying to remove. The darker red is the factory finish red.



The paint is literally so thick, some prodding with a scribe is all takes to get it to start flaking off in chunks. IOW, the OEM surface was not prepped for the paint that was laid down on it.



On the tank, the paint popped off in dime sized flakes. The tail section was a bit more tedious in that chunks that flaked off were not big. More like small pencil eraser sized.



The factory decals were simply painted over also. I chipped off enough paint to reveal the "Ducati Campione Del Mondo Superbike" decal that resides just under the seat on the tail section.



I only point that out because it is a small decal. Only about 1/4" wide and maybe 4 1/2" long. Maybe a bit longer. Removal with a razor blade would have taken maybe a minute. 5 or so with a little clean up to get the surface perfect.



Why waste time when you can just squirt paint over it? Along with many other aspects of this project, that seems to have been the MO of the previous owner (owners?) who did all this.



Getting closer folks. The engine is still in need of work. Quite a lot to be honest about it. I still need to clean it up. That's 1st on my to do list.



Then the alternator cover has to be addressed. After that, valve check, belt install and a fresh set of plugs. Before all of that though, the swing arm bearings have to be removed and new seals and bearings installed.



That will mark the next major milestone in this project. Assembly/build will follow that. Body work aside, a rolling chassis should be assembled by the end of February.



That's my target date. It is heavily dependent upon my ability to get those bearings out of the engine. That is a real pain the behind. More later...when I make further progress.......sean


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post #37 of 47 (permalink) Old 1-13-2019, 12:19 AM Thread Starter
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Update, Saturday 12 January 2019

It's been a little while since I've made much progress but today was quite good in those terms.



I started the day off with the right side plastic. That isn't actually plastic, but fiber glass. The same poorly applied paint that afflicted the tank, was in need of removal.



As with the tank, I found a spot where the paint had popped off, and lo and behold when I inserted my hook scribe it went in the length of the straight half.



I pulled up slightly and a section of paint 4" long and about 2" wide just popped off.



Here are two of the pieces with a golf ball for reference:



That is paint mind you, not bits of the fairing. As I merrily moved along the slabbed side of the thing, I managed to pop off nearly all the paint. As I neared the the upper part a revelation appeared:



A Ducati emblem in the 1992 font. Black outline, white letters with silver accents. The bike is 1993, verified by the VIN. It shouldn't have a Ducati logo on the side, only on the tank.



In a similar font, but in gold outline and silver letters the logo on the side should be "Super Sport" with 900 and "Desmodue" in smaller letters below.


It wasn't through with the surprises though. Not quite. As I continued along, popping paint off in smaller chunks I worked my way towards what appeared to be a crack.



When I reached the "crack" it turned out to be only in the subsurface filler. But then, as I worked my way along popping off both paint and filler, it suddenly got very thick:






This filler was applied over the OEM paint. In fact, it was applied over a second paint job that I found hiding under what appeared to be a candy red color.



What I previously thought was a red primer was in fact a base coat that was under a layer of clear. That layer had been wet sanded and a layer of translucent candy red applied over it. Then more primer and the thick nasty red that I spent my morning popping off.



I mean, I'm glad it all popped off easily...I wasn't looking forward to sanding all that nasty crap down. Not with it being so thick.



Anyway, after lunch I decided it was time to get after the swing arm bearings. I've had a difficult time with their removal and in fact, only got one of them out just today.



I'd already destroyed the bearing. Nothing remained but the outer race. It wasn't moving. Nothing seemed to work. Finally, I decided that welding a nut to the remains of the race might yield some results.



So, I welded a nut on and used an old wheel bearing race to give myself the stand off I needed to get the race clear of the engine. Over the top of that I used a bridge type puller and a bolt to thread into the nut that was welded onto the bearing remains.



It took a while but finally I felt the bearing give a little. Suddenly turning the bolt got easier and finally after welding a second nut on, the bearing race cleared the bore in the engine.



I was able to use a pair of vice grips to remove it completely:



Now the inner bearing and seal must be dealt with, and then I get to do it all again on the other side. Yay.


On the parts side of things, I managed to win an eBay auction for the stand off pins that thread into the horizontal head. There are rubber pads that fit onto these and brace the fairings out away from the engine. As I already bought several NOS pads, these pins are NOS in original packaging also.



All for now....more as progress is made........sean


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post #38 of 47 (permalink) Old 1-19-2019, 11:57 PM Thread Starter
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Today was a successful day. I had this plan for a puller bouncing around in my head. I'd think in one direction then change my mind mid way.....I do this alot before I commit to a direction.



Anyway, I decided that using a flange nut was the way to get the bearings out of the swing arm without destruction, heat or a big hammer and punch.



So, I went to the hardware store and bought a package of 2 flange nuts 12mm X 1.75 thread.

I took one and ground off the flange on two sides of the hex.






The reason I ground it flat on two sides of the nut were so that it would fit entirely through the needle bearing that was stuck fast in the bore on the engine.



Using the old race that I removed last time around by welding a nut to it, I was able to get the proper diameter of the flange. While checking that, I also made sure the hex part of the nut would fit through the bearing.



Since the hex fit through, all I had to do was grind down the flange to side of the hex so that it too would fit if I turned it 90 degrees to the bearing.



It fit most of the way through all on its own, but required some gentle tapping with a hammer and punch to get it all the way through.



Once through, I used a magnetic pick up tool to hold it, flat side of the flange to the back of the inner seal and bearing.



I also bought an 80mm long 12mm X 1.75 bolt to thread in to the nut. This I put through a puller bridge and used an outer wheel bearing race from my son's Blazer to achieve a stand off distance into which to pull the bearing into.



This also makes up for the available threads that can be used.



Here are the pieces I used:



Not pictured is a second wheel bearing race. That came into play when I ran out of available threads before there was enough of the inner bearing protruding from the engine. I had to use it to gain a bit more stand off.



Total cost for this little exercise (not counting the futility of previous attempts, nor the head aches from trying to figure out what might work) was a whopping $2.80 something.



The 2 pack of flange nuts was $1.38 and the bolt was $1.43. I've had the puller bridge for over a decade....maybe 2, as I fabbed that up for a steering wheel puller. The bearing races were left over from the front wheel bearing replacement on my kid's Blazer so, also cost nothing.



The good news in all of that is, it worked and the bearing is now out. All that's left is the counter shaft side which I'll get after tomorrow. Supposed to rain all day so I won't get any pedaling in. Might as well be productive in the garage.......sean


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post #39 of 47 (permalink) Old 2-1-2019, 11:22 PM Thread Starter
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Encountering problems = finding solutions

In my last update I wrote about the solution I came up with for removal of the swing arm bearings. That was a moment of clarity and vision for me. It solved probably the biggest head ache I've thus far encountered.



Yes, there were others that were huge but they were also easily solved without much thought.



Today's solution is for a problem that developed during the repair and upgrade of my swing arm. Now, my welder did an awesome job of the repair. Nothing wrong there.



However, I asked him to add some bungs under the swing arm for some lift spools. He did this also, but used a thick walled tube with a 10mm ID.



There in lies where the problem developed. The tube has a 5mm side wall thickness. Stout enough for what I want to do but not enough to cut threads in for a bolt.




After some thought and consideration, I started looking for an insert of some kind that I could thread a bolt into to hold some lift spools.



I searched the web for days trying to find a solution. When I finally hit on what I envisioned in my head, I found it on a hardware website described as "Sex bolts and barrel nuts"



I'm not making that up.



It turned out that barrel nuts is what I was after, and then it was just a matter of finding ones with the correct outside diameter as well as inside threaded diameter.



I found some on Amazon with the appropriate 10mm OD with 8mm X 1.25 threads. Perfect. At $6 for a bag of 20, even better.




As the barrel nuts are closed on one end, and have a hex inset (allen type bolt head) in a flat base, they're a perfect solution for what I needed. They're also stainless steel.



Installed on the swing arm they are or will be invisible when the wheel is installed;



And finally the lift spool installed:



I'll probably get some longer bolts as there is only around 10mm worth of the bolt threaded into the barrel nut currently. Easy enough to do though....maybe I should go with titanium....you know, to keep down the unsprung weight........sean


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post #40 of 47 (permalink) Old 3-18-2019, 9:44 PM Thread Starter
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Progress

Today, like I mentioned in the comments thread, was warm. Our warmest day so far this year. According to my Weather Underground app it was 76F degrees out. Spring has sprung here I guess.



I got out to my garage around 10ish and got busy masking off my swing arm. I decided that the best course of action was to paint the parts I hadnít already polished. Itís just to keep the aluminum protected as it was bead blasted during the repair process.



From the factory, it appears to be a naked aluminum but is in fact painted in much the same way I painted it. With a durable coating for protecting aluminum from things like brake fluid and battery acid.
Here is a shot of it masked off but already painted:




I used purple foamy ear plugs to keep paint out of the bolt holes and some plastic rivet type fasteners to keep the paint out of the pivot shaft. The few remaining holes I just threaded in some random bolts I had sitting around. Finally, here are some shots of the finished product:










Iíll have just a few minor things to take care of before installation on the engine. The lift spools will be installed and Iím going to have some heavier duty chain adjuster blocks machined up and anodized. Most likely in black as Iíve already gotten the lift spools done in black.



After I finished painting the swing arm, complete with clear coat, I got busy on the engine. Iíd been looking at the valve covers, and thinking they look crap. As I need to get inside them to check the valves, I figured Iíd go ahead and pull them off and clean them up.



I started with the vertical cylinder head and removed both covers. I wish Iíd taken before and after pics of both but the upper one is the exhaust valve cover and the lower one is the intake. Note the darker spots of corrosion on the intake cover.



I took a wire wheel to both, as can be seen on the exhaust valve cover. The darker spots are corroded pores and pits in the metal. The wire wheel I used has brass bristles so is not as aggressive as a stainless steel one. The discoloration is not removeable. The pores and pits must be sanded down to smooth metal in order restore the covers.










This is just on the vertical cylinder, I still have the same to do the horizontal cylinder. As the exhaust valve cover on the horizontal is also the mount for the oil cooler itíll be more work. Iím guessing it will be a major PITA if the pitting is as bad as the vertical cylinder was.



I got some new low mount pipes for the build. They're made by a company called Viper from the UK as far as I know. Anyway, they're not in great shape but nothing a little elbow grease isn't going to fix.



In the pic below I used a little metal polish and it makes a huge difference.



I think I'm going to paint the part where the logo is and wet sand the excess paint off and then polish it out. I'm not sure what color just yet, but likely black since I already have high heat black.



Thatís as far as I got today with all the other ďdomesticĒ duties I had to fulfill. More laterÖÖsean


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post #41 of 47 (permalink) Old 3-31-2019, 11:13 PM Thread Starter
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Teaser

I finished with the frame today. Came out mostly like I wanted it to. I used Duplicolor gold wheel paint along with the matte clear to get the effect I wanted.






Just a teaser pic.....frame is on my bike bench now. Tomorrow I'll install the steering head bearings and triple trees...maybe the forks too if all goes well. In fact, if all goes well, I'll also install the swing arm so I can get the chassis up on stands. That will allow me to start reassembling things while I work on cleaning up the engine. More later.....tomorrow possibly...or Tuesday.....sean
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post #42 of 47 (permalink) Old 4-6-2019, 11:53 PM Thread Starter
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Minor update, 6 April 2019

My self imposed deadline for a rolling chassis has come and gone. I'm behind schedule a bit. After my faff with the threaded insert last weekend, I noted that the forks could use a lick of paint on the fork bottoms.



Anyone here who was around for my 1st New Life for an Old Gixxer thread may or may not remember I gave the fork bottoms on that project a similar treatment.



The later model 900 Super Sport forks I acquired for Project Super Sport were a bit faded and kinda losing paint here and there. Also, the clear coat had yellowed badly and some parts of the fork bottom appeared more gold than the bronze they are supposed to be.



I used the exact same can of metallic bronze I used on the old Gixxer fork bottoms. I used the exact same prep steps, cleaning off all the grease/suspension fluid/brake dust with some mineral spirits first. Masked off the stuff I didn't want bronze and wiped down the area to be painted with a prep solution.



I think they came out quite good. The bronze is an almost perfect match to the factory bronze. In fact, when I first spayed on my tack coat, I couldn't tell where I'd actually laid down any paint it's that close.



So, before I bore everyone to tears with the details, here are the rejuvenated fork bottoms:






In case anyone is wondering, the green tube is medical oxygen tubing. I found it to be perfect to wrap around fork tubes to protect them from scratches and dings when sitting around the garage. My kids are both adults now, but somehow manage to bump into stuff and knock it over just like when they were little. Some things never change I guess.......sean


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post #43 of 47 (permalink) Old 5-8-2019, 12:07 AM Thread Starter
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Not a great deal of progress made, though I did detail what there was on the comments thread. This one is for the pics mainly so I'll cut the blabber and get to the one pic I did manage to take of the wheel after the mask paper was off. It isn't quite done yet, but very close. I have a little bit of detail work to do before I shoot the entire thing in clear coat. Just not 100% on whether I wanna go with a high gloss or matte clear coat. Either way, here is the rear wheel after paint.

I apologize now for my wife's pink sewing chair that I set it on. Don't say anything, she knows nothing about this


.......more later.....and another minor update will be up in the comments thread shortly.....sean


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post #44 of 47 (permalink) Old 5-18-2019, 11:48 PM Thread Starter
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Update for today, 18 May 2019

Today was dry but overcast and chilly in the morning. I got out to the garage as I had to replace the turn signals on my little GSXR. As it previously had some cheesy LED signals mounted (at my wife's behest) and for some reason, the fronts just plain quit, it was time for new ones.



I ordered some Barracuda "Star" signals from Bellissimoto on clearance. They're halogen bulb rather than LED so not nearly as cheesy. Also, Barracuda stuff is pretty well made, and well thought out.



I spent the morning removing the old signals, which TBH, was a right PIA. I finally got them all off, wired up the new ones and installed all 4 of them. Thus, it was after lunch by the time I got started on the PSS.


It also began to rain right about the time I went inside for lunch. At any rate, I started with some minor stuff and general cleaning up of my work bench so I could start on piecing together a single working turn signal pod from the two damaged ones I have.



First though, a little taste of what I did with the rear wheel.



To start with, the original switch pod I had was missing parts of the switches as well as a cover. The switch pod I got on eBay was in better overall shape but the turn signal switch and the horn switch were broken and the horn button was completely missing.



My original was in worse overall shape but the horn and turn signal switches were intact. Grubby, grimey and in general poor shape, but intact.






That's the horn button above. The pasty whitish orangey thing. I'd removed the screw and the switch from it's aperture so it could be easily seen for the picture.






Above is the same view of the new to me switch. As is easily seen, the entire horn button is missing.



I removed the horn button and switch from the original, and soldered it into the new to me switch. Then I replaced the broken turn signal switch (below)



Yes, that is a fly that was stuck to the switch when I opened up the switch pod. The original switch below:



After a good clean and lube, I reassembled the turn signal switch into the new to me pod.





Then it was time to do something about that nasty, sun faded, and dry rotted horn button. I used my dremmel with a felt cone and some compound to clean off the dry rot and polish the button back to something sort of recognizable.




That's about all the progress I was able to make today. It took me most of the afternoon to get that far. While I had aspirations of getting back out in the garage this evening and getting the rear wheel bearings installed along with the new valve stem from CNC Racing I decided instead to have a drink after dinner and sit down to do this update.



I'll get back out to the garage again tomorrow....but as it is Grand Prix weekend at Le Mans, I'll be watching the races in the AM, then getting ready for the coming work week after....meaning any progress will be in the afternoon before dinner. Minimal in other words. More later....sean


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post #45 of 47 (permalink) Old 5-26-2019, 8:23 PM Thread Starter
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Update, 26 May 2019

Got quite a bit done the last couple of days. Took apart the rear sets first off. Gotta order new rubber for the foot pegs. Ducati Omaha still shows them for the 2001 Supersport/ST and those are the same pegs as the older ones.



As I had them apart, I cleaned them up, sanded the old nasty paint and then after a shot of etching primer, painted them satin black. Pics of those later.


Also took the speedometer head apart and cleaned all the numbers up. There was dust and debris inside the glass and the needle was no longer white like the tach.



After I removed the speedo from the cluster, it was apparent that someone had been in there before. The metal ring was distorted on the back side and the paint on it was just piss poor.



I used a stainless steel wire wheel on my dremmel and stripped off all the old paint. After some etching primer I painted it satin black.



After that I washed the dust and grime off of the speedo dial and treated the needle to a fresh coat of orange paint. I figured that would stand out better than white on white.



I didn't take a before shot but here is the speedo needle and the newly washed dial:



Also got to work on the brakes and clutch hydraulics. Took apart the rear brake system and this is what the inside of the reservoir looked like:



The master cylinder wasn't any better either:



There is a reason that manufacturers recommend changing the brake fluid on a scheduled basis.



It was so bad I decided to split the rear caliper and clean it out. Once split, it looked like this inside both halves:



After a trip through my ultra-sonic cleaner with some simple dish soap and water it came out like this:



Once I got to the front brake reservoir it was much of the same....only with chunks.




While I was waiting on paint to dry and hydraulics to drain into my drain bucket I managed to install the high mounts for the new high pipes I got.




Finally here is a comparison of the new to me subframe with the original that came with the bike:



The original is the closest to my boots. All for now, more tomorrow maybe..........sean
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post #46 of 47 (permalink) Old 6-9-2019, 12:54 AM Thread Starter
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Minor update, 8 June 2019

Didn't get much done this week. However, today I got a surprise in the mail




All sorts of new rubber parts to replace those that were simply dry rotted, cracked or set in a shape from being installed for 27 years. Anyway, I did manage to do some installation but realized the screws were badly perished as well. So tomrrow, I'm off to the hardware store to buy yet more stainless steel hardware.



Instead of mucking around with stuff I couldn't install, I decided today was finally the day that I start tackling the engine. It is filthy. Even that is an understatement.



This is a view of the horizontal head where it meets the crankcase. The "V" so to speak.




The horizontal head for those not familiar, points straight at the back of the front wheel. All the garbage kicked up by the front wheel goes straight back and deposits itself here. This is AFTER scrubbing with an acid brush and mineral spirits for about half an hour.




This is a good comparison shot. ^^^ The grimy oil supply hose on the left, and the cleaned up crankcase on the right. The whole area you see in this picture looked like the banjo fitting on the left, and then some.




Another comparison. This is the bottom of the vertical cylinder, right above where the horizontal cylinder meets the V. The right side has been cleaned once. The left side still awaits the brush and mineral spirits. You can see all the garbage in the fins of the vertical cylinder. The fins on the horizontal are far worse.




^^^This is the dirt I dug out from below the fins before I started in with the acid brush and mineral spirits.


^^^A good portion of the 10lbs of sand and gravel I dug out from the base of the fins. Sad part is, I'm not even close to being done with cleaning up. I still have to go fin by fin and clean out all the debris seen in the previous pics. Seriously, the junk in the pie tin above came ONLY from the base of the cylinders where they face the front of the bike.



I even found a roll pin stuck in between the upper fins of the horizontal cylinder. 4mm diameter by 30mm in length. Who knows what it was doing there but it was covered in so much grime it was evident it had been there for a long time.



Tomorrow, as I get time more clean up of the engine moar pics, particularly if the clean up goes quicker than today. Likely not though as I have to prepare for my week ahead, and on top of that, get bikes ready for a long road trip. Headed off to the West Coast Ducati Meet on Thursday. Looking forward to getting up into the Sierras and the cool mountain air. Forecast for the week is high 90s and into the 100s.


Monterey will be in the 50s and 60s. I need to win the lotto so I can move there.......sean
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post #47 of 47 (permalink) Old 6-30-2019, 1:46 AM Thread Starter
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Update 29 June, 2019

It's been almost a full year since I brought this project home. Only short by a week or so......maybe more like a day.



I wish I could tell everyone I was done and it looked magnificent but that's not the case. As has been detailed here in the PSS thread, there have been many complications and surprises. Mainly the cracked swing arm and alternator cover.



Both of those are now fixed. Only for me to find further cracks in the crank case half. Where I'd thought there was just single minor fracture, there turned out to be a series of cracks which may have ended up leaking oil out into the counter shaft sprocket cavity. No huge deal if it did....just a little extra chain lube.


I still decided to go ahead and fix those cracks. While I was at it, I took some pics of both the cracks and the damage inflicted upon this engine when some gorilla went at the alternator cover removal process with some screwdrivers and a hammer.



What you're looking at it, is a picture taken of my inspection mirror looking up at the cracks in the left side crank case half. The different color piece you see in the reflection is where the cracks are.



That piece is the center of the cracks. One to the left of it goes past the piece and is nearly 7/8' in length. Then the crack that forms the piece makes an arc from the mating edge of the crank case half to the longer crack.



This is the result of a chain derailment at some point in the life of the bike. What you see that resembles a protrusion at the cracks is the JB Weld where it worked it's way down through the cracks from the outside.










Above you can see the marks in the crank case half where the screw driver was driven in with a hammer to separate the alternator cover from the case half. Sad. All that was needed was a puller and it would have come off without a fight....and no damage to either the crank case or the alternator cover.






Above is the repaired area of the cracks shown in the first image. JB Weld can be quite useful, and effective in repairs of the non-structural kind.



The cracks are sealed up, and the crank case half is now level for the purpose of sealing the alternator cover to it.



Last pic for tonight. I promised in the comments thread that I'd post a pic of the new rear sprocket mounted with the titanium sprocket nuts so here you go:



Finally, I was going through a box of spare parts that was included in the sale of my 996 a few years ago. I'd stashed it away and mostly forgotten about it. As I dug thought it, I found a refurbed pressure plate that I'm not entirely sure where it came from. Cool thing is, it has the old Cagiva era Ducati font on it. Could be it gets a coat of gold paint on the spring seat side.


Also in the box, I found a billet Cycle Cat vented clutch cover. That's 2 things down that I don't have to buy now as both will fit the PSS perfectly. Also whilst digging through the spare parts, I found a new 3 phase stator for the alternator, a full set of OEM style foot controls AND a set of aftermarket ones too. SCORE.



I'll likely be able to fit the controls at least. The rear sets are no where near the correct length, orientation nor bolt pattern. All good news though. I'm just not sure about the stator.....I'll have to do more research to see if it will fit. If so, DONE!. It'll make wiring in a MOSFET regulator rectifier that much easier. More later..........sean


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