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Eyy, I have a red one too. Lookin' slick. Are those stock exhaust cans, just coated with heat paint? I like the all black.

Also curious how your front signals are mounted, can't tell if they are on the fork, or somehow bracketed from the headlight plastics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Eyy, I have a red one too. Lookin' slick. Are those stock exhaust cans, just coated with heat paint? I like the all black.

Also curious how your front signals are mounted, can't tell if they are on the fork, or somehow bracketed from the headlight plastics.
home made brackets (aluminum angle) mounted to the underside of the front fairing. The 20 hours came from figuring how to alter parts to attach them in different places. I'm proud that I came up with a way to eliminate the mandatory stock license plate light. I carefully cut out part of the underside section of the stock rear light. Having the plate right under that tail light gives with the red plastic removed to open a slot brought out enough illumination on the plate. I doubt few found a way to tuck the small angled in cooling hose on the left side so it doesn't stick out. The muffler mounts were tricky. I kept just enough of the square tubing configuration holding the jettisoned passenger foot rests to attach a simple mount. Mounting the grab bar was also a challenge. I was determined to not pay a welder. The $30 came from the muffler paint, hack saw blades. I did have 3/8ths inch nuts migged to the swing arm and then designed "spools". I also had to make a stand to accomodate the spools. The center stand was removed. Thanks for the inquiry. It's a 2002 with 20K miles.
 

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nice job. well thought out. I would have to point out though that you really should try and put that electrical gear under cover (say under the seat) it is not protected from the weather without the fairings. and will short out in the rain. (guess how I know) so unless you live in the Mojave desert or where it never rains or gets wet. it is something you should think about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
nice job. well thought out. I would have to point out though that you really should try and put that electrical gear under cover (say under the seat) it is not protected from the weather without the fairings. and will short out in the rain. (guess how I know) so unless you live in the Mojave desert or where it never rains or gets wet. it is something you should think about.
I'll ponder your advice. I ride in the rain plenty- no problems so far but maybe I've been lucky. Someone said I would regret taking off the center stand but my riding is strictly local (no more than 5 miles from home base) so I wouldn't be doing any on the spot road repairs needing a center stand. I'd just walk home and then take the custom spool oriented stand with me in the car. I was really irked that spools weren't on the bike-which I inherited from my son who had been transferred overseas for the State Department. I had a CB750 KI right out of the Army in '69. My choice today? Easy- a 636 but with no plastic. PS. it wasn't easy or relaxing drilling into and then cutting a slot in the underneath of the tail light plastic to let light shine down upon the license plate since it seemed brittle and I sure didn't want to crack it.
 

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Looks great. It's the age old argument, but to me it looks MUCH better with less plastic. These things are so cheap now, preserving everything in stock condition isn't going pay off like it used to. Might as well have fun with it. You feel like posting a shot of the rear too? Curious to see what you did there.
 

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Looks great. It's the age old argument, but to me it looks MUCH better with less plastic. These things are so cheap now, preserving everything in stock condition isn't going pay off like it used to. Might as well have fun with it. You feel like posting a shot of the rear too? Curious to see what you did there.
read that and weep. that is what everyone thought 30years ago when they were cutting, chopping. and scrapping all the old plentiful but almost worthless bikes of the 50's and 60's. short sighted wasn't it. try to get hold of one in any condition now never mind a stock one without having very deep pockets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
read that and weep. that is what everyone thought 30years ago when they were cutting, chopping. and scrapping all the old plentiful but almost worthless bikes of the 50's and 60's. short sighted wasn't it. try to get hold of one in any condition now never mind a stock one without having very deep pockets.
A 2002 EX500 Is just a....................motorcyle and nothing to savor or consider a collector's bike. It is already obsolete since it has a monstrous infernal combustion engine. A Tesla roadster just did zero to 60 mph in 1.2 seconds. Goodbye internal combustion! Good riddance. Electric bikes make sense. A Kawasaki EX500 tricked out is already deservedly defunct- so is a Hyabusal The thrill of riding a motorcycle has never been equalled when I rode a Cushman at 13 in 1957 at 25 mph and I've ridden some super quick bikes (on the street-never a track). It's all context of course. To a 13 year old boy in 1957 25mph was like breaking the sound barrier.
 

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hi. it seems we are roughly a similar age if the above is accurate only mine was a 1951 BSA Bantam that did 42mph downhill with a tail wind. :) among the 50 or so bikes I have had since then was a Brough superior and a Vincent black shadow. how I wish they were still in the back of the garage $$$$. when all this green nonsense has run it's course all the old gear will have value. electric is not the future just a means to get there like the steam engine was.
like steam electric has problems. with steam it was water. electric it's the batteries try going from New York to Vegas in a Tesla by road. when you have to stop for a recharge every 180miles. then 1.2sec to 60mph is rather pointless.
the idiots we have in charge just now say there will be no new sales of IC cars from 2030. 9 years away. good luck with that. when there is no infrastructure to support it.
remember when the first Music cassettes came out. marvellous this is the future. records are dead. and now through new inventions you can play every recording made by a particular artist on a chip no bigger than your little fingernail but guess what music lovers still prefer to hear music on Vinyl records.
the old EX500 may be old hat but to me when it's on full song is music to my ears.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
hi. it seems we are roughly a similar age if the above is accurate only mine was a 1951 BSA Bantam that did 42mph downhill with a tail wind. :) among the 50 or so bikes I have had since then was a Brough superior and a Vincent black shadow. how I wish they were still in the back of the garage $$$$. when all this green nonsense has run it's course all the old gear will have value. electric is not the future just a means to get there like the steam engine was.
like steam electric has problems. with steam it was water. electric it's the batteries try going from New York to Vegas in a Tesla by road. when you have to stop for a recharge every 180miles. then 1.2sec to 60mph is rather pointless.
the idiots we have in charge just now say there will be no new sales of IC cars from 2030. 9 years away. good luck with that. when there is no infrastructure to support it.
remember when the first Music cassettes came out. marvellous this is the future. records are dead. and now through new inventions you can play every recording made by a particular artist on a chip no bigger than your little fingernail but guess what music lovers still prefer to hear music on Vinyl records.
the old EX500 may be old hat but to me when it's on full song is music to my ears.
I'm a professional pianist but when asked what I play I say a transducer. What listeners hear on a booking isn't really a piano per se but Kurzweil's simulacrum via an electro mechanical transducer. All of us today are listening to mainly electronic music for once something is recorded it automatically becomes electronic. An acoustic drummer may say he plays real drums but what we hear on a recording are................electronic drums. The purest form of "fidelity" was the player piano. A pianist's performance is captured on punched paper and then a person loads that paper into their home player piano and the performance is now on the listeners home piano as if the player's fingers were actually in the room playing their piano. Piano to piano- it doesn't get any purer than that. There are slight differences of course since any good pianist adjusts their playing to each piano.- I would certainly play each piano differently at every location responding to the action and quirks of an acoustic instrument but the player piano beats an LP any day as far as "fidelity". One can find a sweet spot on every piano and transpose works to take advantage of every pianos complimentary resonance..
I wish I had that Cushman but it was a neighbor's scooter who eventually moved away. I admit to finding the inherited EX500 a doofus looking bike. Out of pure male vanity I needed something a little more "masculine". I also admit to almost a fetish of altering something at minimum cost.
 

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read that and weep. that is what everyone thought 30years ago when they were cutting, chopping. and scrapping all the old plentiful but almost worthless bikes of the 50's and 60's. short sighted wasn't it. try to get hold of one in any condition now never mind a stock one without having very deep pockets.
I do get that sentiment, but many of the bikes that are collectors now (but at one time were considered worthless) were innovative and cool in their day. The heritage is what makes them collectable. The 500 has never been cool, or innovative. It's an entry level motorcycle that, in stock form is dorky looking. Not only does the plastic look bad, but it breaks easily and isn't worth replacing. If I bought a stock 500 in very good condition, I agree, leaving it stock makes sense - but this situation is rare or non-existent. I've had mine since 2008 and the plastic has seen better days. In my case, and likely most cases, I would need to spend the value of the bike to get it in "very good" stock condition. I can spend half that or less to chop it up, learn some skills, have some fun, and create a fun bike to cruise around on. I love the 500, and I think it deserves far more credit than it gets, but for me and many others, keeping it stock doesn't add up. Just my opinion though, I get what you are saying.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I do get that sentiment, but many of the bikes that are collectors now (but at one time were considered worthless) were innovative and cool in their day. The heritage is what makes them collectable. The 500 has never been cool, or innovative. It's an entry level motorcycle that, in stock form is dorky looking. Not only does the plastic look bad, but it breaks easily and isn't worth replacing. If I bought a stock 500 in very good condition, I agree, leaving it stock makes sense - but this situation is rare or non-existent. I've had mine since 2008 and the plastic has seen better days. In my case, and likely most cases, I would need to spend the value of the bike to get it in "very good" stock condition. I can spend half that or less to chop it up, learn some skills, have some fun, and create a fun bike to cruise around on. I love the 500, and I think it deserves far more credit than it gets, but for me and many others, keeping it stock doesn't add up. Just my opinion though, I get what you are saying.
I own an unusually beautiful sounding Steinway B built circa 1922- which was completely rebuilt in 1963 just before it was purchased by my parents for me just starting at USC as a piano major. My wife treasures it-she is also a professional pianist. It is starting to have some issues and I say I'm not going to put in a new pin block. Screw it! Put it out on the curb come trash day although at 850 lbs I doubt the trashguys would see fit to hoist it into the back of their truck. I use midi controllers and boutique sound modules for all my bookings, composing and practice. Most Bs are worshipped and the rebuilt earlier ones are fetching higher prices than the ones produced today. It is just.......... a piano. I tell her I'll buy her the Kawai VPC-1 the best software piano simulacrum and even the computer it takes for such a large CPU load. The B can't really be played at full rpm in our living room without guests fleeing holding their ears. It can bark that loudly. A piano is just a commodity- the B has served me and us well but so what? Other stuff is out there. People get attached to things in an unhealthy way. My granddaughter's tip of her little finger is worth more than the Steinway. People matter- things don't.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Eyy, I have a red one too. Lookin' slick. Are those stock exhaust cans, just coated with heat paint? I like the all black.

Also curious how your front signals are mounted, can't tell if they are on the fork, or somehow bracketed from the headlight plastics.
I mentioned that I seem to have a fetish of making something more to my tastes but with no monetary output. I was determined to work with only the materials at hand and not spend money on after market doodads which I assume are plentiful for this model of motorcycle. I cut the seat foam with a bread knife- and even the plastic but not the vinyl covering. I took the seat to an upholsterer to finish the job and they all rejected me. So that is when I decided to do EVERYTHING!. **** all those professional "trades people" claiming to offer their services. Cutting the front fairing while it was still on the bike was pretty bold. It was done with a hack saw but one with a seven inch arch. I was really pissed when I bought a stand and found that I would have to use "paddles" to support the swing arm. I cut down that stand and made a special handle and had 3/8ths inch nuts migged to the swing arm (that was most of my $30). I then fashioned what would work as a spool with a 3/8th carriage bolt filed down and a sleeve I understand that Kawasaki put spools on bikes circa 2005. The one I inherited was a 2002. It has lost its metrosexual look. Now I'm an aging geezer playing out some twisted rogue alpha male scenario on a wicked looking bike.
 

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I cut the seat foam with a bread knife- and even the plastic but not the vinyl covering. I took the seat to an upholsterer to finish the job and they all rejected me. So that is when I decided to do EVERYTHING!. **** all those professional "trades people" claiming to offer their services.
you mean your not surprised by this.
 

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This thread shows to go you, that the street fighter route is not necessary with a bit of effort you can make a presentable job of it instead od a bodge

FOG
 

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This thread shows to go you, that the street fighter route is not necessary with a bit of effort you can make a presentable job of it instead od a bodge

FOG
I would argue that this is a streetfighter. The difference is that it was undertaken by someone with time and effort, and not mangled by some talentless hack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
you mean your not surprised by this.
I was naive and at age 75! (I'm 77 now) It was foolish of me to think others are as conscientious, courteous and open to a quick $25 (I had the $25 in my hand). It would have taken an upholsterer five minutes but he just blew me off. Never having done such a thing meant I fumbled with the seat for maybe 30 minutes trying to figure out how to fold the vinyl cover properly and then staple it correctly.
 

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naive probably. but akin to finding a coat in a dumpster then taking it to a tailor for new Zipper fitted. not going to happen.
a least you learned (your never too old) a new skill.
I was 67 before I ever picked up a welding torch. I found a crack on bike frame and tried (unsuccessfully) to find someone to weld it. so I bought a welder. did loads of practice then tackled the cracked frame. now I have 3 welders and can do, most types of welding. when you have to you can do anything.
 
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