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Back on the site after a long absence. Great thread! The only thing I'd like to add is maintenance.

Tire pressures? Tread?
Horn?
All lights working?
Chain?
Cables/controls all working? (frozen water in a clutch or throttle cable is a bad thing)
Etc.

Gear in good shape?

If your bike isn't prepared, you aren't prepared. Winter riding is great, but things really change as the temps go up and down, particularly tire pressures and body temperatures. It is hard to steer and ride with that "wiggly" feeling that comes from an under-inflated tire (been there!). It is also hard to ride and maintain control when you are shivering!

Rubber side down to all!
 

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roxynoodle said:
I'm seeing a lot of accidents lately here. There's a few things I'd like to say and I hope others will add to it. I don't like seeing people, or their bikes, getting hurt.

1. Please take MSF and study their materials in the book and online.

2. Read every riding tip you can find online. There are a lot of good sites that give you tips on pretty much anything you might encounter.

3. Read Proficient Motorcyling by David Hough. I don't know if he's ever raced, but he knows how to stay alive on the streets. Learning to stay alive is more important, people.

4. Don't ride if you are tired, sick, emotional or under the influence. Ever. You need to be paying 100% attention to everything going on around you.

5. Don't ride above your abilities. If your friends are really friends they will understand that. Take things as slowly as you feel you need to and ignore idiots that may poke fun at you. Your life is your life.

6. Wear your gear all the time. If you don't have gear, get it. There are lots of closeout deals, ebay and craigslist. I have never paid full price for any of my gear and have a lot of it.

7. Don't be afraid to ask on here or ask an experienced rider for help with any skills you are struggling with.

8. Practice, practice, practice even if it means hours in a parking lot.

Just please take care of yourselves. I know I'm no expert. This is my 3rd season riding and I still consider myself a noob compared to people who have ridden many more years than I have. I haven't crashed yet, although I know I probably will. But, I go out there everyday with the attitude that I'm careful, prepared, geared up and mentally ready to ride. I hope when the day comes that I hang up my helmet that I can say I was the unlikely statistic that never crashed. We'll see. Just please be careful, folks and do everything you can to be prepared for cagers, animals, sand/gravel, etc.
Great post . And I'm going to check out that book as well as the MSF
 
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Discussion Starter #43
I think it's really easy (too easy) to say you won't get in a collision when you live somewhere with a population of 1000 people, for example. I.e., outside of an urban centre. You can only be predictable for yourself. You cannot, ever, predict what others will do. Reading a few books about riding technique doesn't mean that others on the road actually follow the rules, or give a rat's ass about you and your mad skillz. In my short time in Brampton, I'm amazed by the **** I've seen drivers pull. We're talking postage stamp sized suburb with a population of 500,000. And most of them couldn't operate a vehicle safely to save their lives, little less yours.

I've resolved myself to the fact that I stand an excellent chance of getting hit next summer. I can't delude myself into some false sense of security that I won't based on words spoken on a forum. Neither should anyone else.
 

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stormcat said:
I think it's really easy (too easy) to say you won't get in a collision when you live somewhere with a population of 1000 people, for example. I.e., outside of an urban centre. You can only be predictable for yourself. You cannot, ever, predict what others will do. Reading a few books about riding technique doesn't mean that others on the road actually follow the rules, or give a rat's ass about you and your mad skillz. In my short time in Brampton, I'm amazed by the **** I've seen drivers pull. We're talking postage stamp sized suburb with a population of 500,000. And most of them couldn't operate a vehicle safely to save their lives, little less yours.

I've resolved myself to the fact that I stand an excellent chance of getting hit next summer. I can't delude myself into some false sense of security that I won't based on words spoken on a forum. Neither should anyone else.
You're right about you're observations about drivers in Brampton. We pretty much have the same type of driver here in Woodridge (except maybe the cars are bigger ;D). I constantly had to remind myself to stay extra vigilant and remember what I learned on the MSF course and read here. Ultimately, you just can't predict what others will do.
 

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roxynoodle said:
4. Don't ride if you are tired, sick, emotional or under the influence. Ever. You need to be paying 100% attention to everything going on around you.
I definitely support that statement. My only motorcycle accident was three years ago at a time when work was tough and I was having a bad week. I did overtime, went back home and re-installed the rear wheel (was out for rim repair). By the time I was done it was 9pm and I was trashed, but I was foolish enough to go out to "see how it turned out". I was distracted and did not pay enough attention and I let a car nudge me down.

Pay attention to your limits! Don't drive if your mind can't work at its best!
 

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I have a question that relates to this info. I'm new to riding and have only had my permit for a week. I was wondering about how to approach emergency stops after blind corners. My instinct is to jump on the front brake but I was taught in MSF that front brake+turn = me going down. However, the back brake is just way too weak to slow down quickly. The situation is that I round a blind corner in the proper part of the lane but need to stop quickly with short notice. Do I just back brake+downshift and apply front brake if I won't stop in time and accept the consequences?
 
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Discussion Starter #48
ducks said:
I have a question that relates to this info. I'm new to riding and have only had my permit for a week. I was wondering about how to approach emergency stops after blind corners. My instinct is to jump on the front brake but I was taught in MSF that front brake+turn = me going down. However, the back brake is just way too weak to slow down quickly. The situation is that I round a blind corner in the proper part of the lane but need to stop quickly with short notice. Do I just back brake+downshift and apply front brake if I won't stop in time and accept the consequences?
The thing about corners and braking is grabbing the brake while being in a lean. YOU should not be cranked over in a lean. As a matter of fact, no one should be so leaned over on a blind corner that they would not be able to emergency stop safely. In the event that you need to emergency stop in this sort of situation, stand the bike upright, then brake while shifting down into 1st.

In my MSF they had us practice emergency braking while in corners.

Take the MSF if you haven't done so. It sounds like you haven't.
 

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stormcat said:
ducks said:
I have a question that relates to this info. I'm new to riding and have only had my permit for a week. I was wondering about how to approach emergency stops after blind corners. My instinct is to jump on the front brake but I was taught in MSF that front brake+turn = me going down. However, the back brake is just way too weak to slow down quickly. The situation is that I round a blind corner in the proper part of the lane but need to stop quickly with short notice. Do I just back brake+downshift and apply front brake if I won't stop in time and accept the consequences?
The thing about corners and braking is grabbing the brake while being in a lean. YOU should not be cranked over in a lean. As a matter of fact, no one should be so leaned over on a blind corner that they would not be able to emergency stop safely. In the event that you need to emergency stop in this sort of situation, stand the bike upright, then brake while shifting down into 1st.

In my MSF they had us practice emergency braking while in corners.

Take the MSF if you haven't done so. It sounds like you haven't.
I have done the MSF, I mentioned it briefly in my post. I did it with Two Guys Training (I'm NL too). The only emergency braking we did was in a straight line and they really stressed to never ever use front brake in a turn. I guess my worry would be that I round a blind corner (not at fast speed) with cars coming the other way and I have to stop all of a sudden because there is something in the road. I could stand the bike upright but that might put me into opposing traffic?
 
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Discussion Starter #50
ducks said:
stormcat said:
ducks said:
I have a question that relates to this info. I'm new to riding and have only had my permit for a week. I was wondering about how to approach emergency stops after blind corners. My instinct is to jump on the front brake but I was taught in MSF that front brake+turn = me going down. However, the back brake is just way too weak to slow down quickly. The situation is that I round a blind corner in the proper part of the lane but need to stop quickly with short notice. Do I just back brake+downshift and apply front brake if I won't stop in time and accept the consequences?
The thing about corners and braking is grabbing the brake while being in a lean. YOU should not be cranked over in a lean. As a matter of fact, no one should be so leaned over on a blind corner that they would not be able to emergency stop safely. In the event that you need to emergency stop in this sort of situation, stand the bike upright, then brake while shifting down into 1st.

In my MSF they had us practice emergency braking while in corners.

Take the MSF if you haven't done so. It sounds like you haven't.
I have done the MSF, I mentioned it briefly in my post. I did it with Two Guys Training (I'm NL too). The only emergency braking we did was in a straight line and they really stressed to never ever use front brake in a turn. I guess my worry would be that I round a blind corner (not at fast speed) with cars coming the other way and I have to stop all of a sudden because there is something in the road. I could stand the bike upright but that might put me into opposing traffic?
I am SHOCKED that Bill and Darryl didn't practice, practice, practice this with you guys. I know them both, and have ridden off-road with Bill. They're both very conscientious riders and instructors. I took the Gearing Up course through the government down at the DMV. They drilled emergency stops in corners into us.

Since I rode around NL for 4 years, I am going to tell you right now to follow the posted speed limits in around St. John's, Mount Pearl, CBS, etc. If you follow them, you will never be too leaned over to practice an emergency stop. You would literally need to be dragging knee to be too far leaned over. Standing up a bike is not a big deal either. Moreover, if you're actually looking through a turn as far as you can, there is no reason to not be able to see what's ahead of you.

Lastly, don't ride over your head. One great place to do that is going through Petty Harbour. SLOW DOWN.

Do you ever go to Paradise Timmy's on Tuesday nights? A lot of those guys from Extremez are my friends, so I don't want to speak ill of them. But I will say they are very experienced riders and have the tendency to take some risks that I wouldn't. Even now on my 5th summer riding. That said, if you ride with any of the b'ys, just ride your own ride, and don't try to keep up.

Btw, what EX500 did you end up with? Sorry if I missed your Intro post. I'm always kind of curious to find out what happened to my '07 in Solar Yellow. I sold it to a guy named Matt in 2009, and I know he wanted to upgrade to a 600RR in short order.

EDIT: I see you bought a 2007. Does it have a small dent in the gas tank? If so, that's my old bike. My cat made that dent when he knocked a piece of vintage crystal off a shelf onto the bike. I stored it in the kitchen the first winter. :D

<--- Is this your bike?
 
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Discussion Starter #51
Ducks, I forgot to mention that the entire width of the lane is yours. Use it to get a better view, go around potholes, manhole covers, moose... :D
 

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I am SHOCKED that Bill and Darryl didn't practice, practice, practice this with you guys. I know them both, and have ridden off-road with Bill. They're both very conscientious riders and instructors. I took the Gearing Up course through the government down at the DMV. They drilled emergency stops in corners into us.

Since I rode around NL for 4 years, I am going to tell you right now to follow the posted speed limits in around St. John's, Mount Pearl, CBS, etc. If you follow them, you will never be too leaned over to practice an emergency stop. You would literally need to be dragging knee to be too far leaned over. Standing up a bike is not a big deal either. Moreover, if you're actually looking through a turn as far as you can, there is no reason to not be able to see what's ahead of you.

Lastly, don't ride over your head. One great place to do that is going through Petty Harbour. SLOW DOWN.

Do you ever go to Paradise Timmy's on Tuesday nights? A lot of those guys from Extremez are my friends, so I don't want to speak ill of them. But I will say they are very experienced riders and have the tendency to take some risks that I wouldn't. Even now on my 5th summer riding. That said, if you ride with any of the b'ys, just ride your own ride, and don't try to keep up.

Btw, what EX500 did you end up with? Sorry if I missed your Intro post. I'm always kind of curious to find out what happened to my '07 in Solar Yellow. I sold it to a guy named Matt in 2009, and I know he wanted to upgrade to a 600RR in short order.

EDIT: I see you bought a 2007. Does it have a small dent in the gas tank? If so, that's my old bike. My cat made that dent when he knocked a piece of vintage crystal off a shelf onto the bike. I stored it in the kitchen the first winter. :D

<--- Is this your bike?
I didn't have Bill/Darryl. I found the training really good but that was one of the things that we didn't cover. They may have said what to do and just not practiced it, I do tend to zone out sometimes. I've only had my permit for a week so I really haven't done much riding. Lots of laps around Logy Bay/Outer Cove/Flatrock/Pouch Cove. I was more adventurous yesterday and took Prince Philip/Columbus out past the Village and such. I don't go to Tim's or hang around with many riders (yet anyway) so I'm not too worried about going over my head by trying to keep up. I only have one rider friend and he knows that I'm pretty sketchy with this stuff so he takes it easy :D. I really want to do the Irish Loop if we get a nice weekend, or perhaps just venture out towards Holyrood.

My bike is the titanium colour. Got it from a guy in Foxtrap. Is this your bike? http://stjohns.kijiji.ca/c-cars-vehicles-motorcycles-sport-bikes-2007-Kawasaki-Ninja-500-W0QQAdIdZ273942534 . I sent an email about that one a while back but it was a bit overpriced. I think it was a guy named Steve selling it.
 
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Discussion Starter #53
Not teaching you guys about emergency stops in corners in NL of all places is a massive frickin' oversight! :eek:

I don't think that's my bike unless someone replaced the tank. Like I said, mine had a small dent on it. Right on the top, so hard to miss. That guy is selling that '07 for about what I got for mine when I sold it in 2009. Ridiculous! There are three '07 in Solar Yellow on the island. But that's not my Mr. Ted Takashima. I kind of get the feeling the guy I sold mine to trashed it.

The Loop is killer on the lower back. Watch for caribou herds down at the lower part of the loop. There is also a large section of the loop with no gas stations, so gas up when you can. One section is actually a road that goes over the ocean, and it is sometimes closed because of waves crashing over it. The good parts: stop for fish 'n' chips at the diner (it's in the North Atlantic lot) when you get to Witless Bay Line. I've heard they're good. Don't forget to stop at the base of the Loop at the visitor centre and take a pic. :)

Have they reopened the back road from Holyrood to Bay Roberts yet? It was closed all last summer for resurfacing. That's also a nice, little ride and you can stop in Brigus. I loved Brigus. There are more loop rides as well. Old Perlican Loop is one and it's not as long as the Irish Loop. Here's a vid of me and my ex riding it last summer:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8_EKAHcBfPA



Enjoy riding in NL. I don't live there anymore, so I'm jealous of the roads you get to travel. :)
 

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stormcat said:
<--- Is this your bike?
Okay......that is awesome!

My next house will have a finished walkout basement so I can park my bike(s) inside during the winter.
 

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In the MSF-BRC there is no emergency brake while in a corner...but there is the stop while in a corner...Stand the bike up and brake.

If your in a corner...and not at max lean...you can use your front brake...be gentle with it...no jabbing...squeeze...but if you need to emergency brake...stand it up straight and squeeze...
 
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Discussion Starter #56
House_of_Dexter said:
In the MSF-BRC there is no emergency brake while in a corner
They teach this in the NL course. Probably because 99% of the roads are twisties and sweepers. Lots of moose, b'y. Ya gots ta be prepared, right?
 
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Discussion Starter #57
So Ducks, I looked into this and no wonder you were not taught how to emergency brake in corners. Darrell walked away from Two Guys Training and rumour has it Bill left it to a guy who has only been riding since 2005. What a shame for that to happen. Bill and Darrell were great instructors. Although Bill did like to yell at me a lot. :D
 

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roxynoodle said:
...
4. Don't ride if you are tired, sick, emotional or under the influence. Ever. You need to be paying 100% attention to everything going on around you.
...
Words to live by... and I would add Hungry to that list as well.

On 10/15 I went out for a ride that changed my life...
I had worked 1/2 a day, got home (in the cage) and decided to take a ride to get some lunch. I was wound-up and aggravated from work, and hungry too; I hadn't eaten since supper the day before. (not uncommon for me at all)
At about 40mph I experienced a brief black out, which docs chalked-up to a fluctuation in blood sugar. I snapped to just before my front tire crossed the white line coming into a curve to the left. Somehow I had the time and forethought to aim for a space between 2 trees. Unfortunately they were too close, the bike & I contacted both trees. That threw me from the bike... I landed with my back against a 3rd tree and the bike followed me, hitting and pinning me to the 3rd tree. It pretty much went downhill from there.
Now fast forward 5 weeks, I still rely on a wheelchair and have a laundry list of issues, some will be permanent.
Moral of the story? Follow "#4" plus keep hunger in mind, as they are some of the few variables we have control over ;)
 

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Slvr720 said:
roxynoodle said:
...
4. Don't ride if you are tired, sick, emotional or under the influence. Ever. You need to be paying 100% attention to everything going on around you.
...
Words to live by... and I would add Hungry to that list as well.

On 10/15 I went out for a ride that changed my life...
I had worked 1/2 a day, got home (in the cage) and decided to take a ride to get some lunch. I was wound-up and aggravated from work, and hungry too; I hadn't eaten since supper the day before. (not uncommon for me at all)
At about 40mph I experienced a brief black out, which docs chalked-up to a fluctuation in blood sugar. I snapped to just before my front tire crossed the white line coming into a curve to the left. Somehow I had the time and forethought to aim for a space between 2 trees. Unfortunately they were too close, the bike & I contacted both trees. That threw me from the bike... I landed with my back against a 3rd tree and the bike followed me, hitting and pinning me to the 3rd tree. It pretty much went downhill from there.
Now fast forward 5 weeks, I still rely on a wheelchair and have a laundry list of issues, some will be permanent.
Moral of the story? Follow "#4" plus keep hunger in mind, as they are some of the few variables we have control over ;)
Mam, sorry to hear that. Hope the permanent damage is limited, take care of yourself. I hope others learn from your experience.
 

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VICIOINA said:
Mam, sorry to hear that. Hope the permanent damage is limited, take care of yourself. I hope others learn from your experience.
That would be a very good thing. As far as my issues go, I'm still recovering... to what point is unknown. Docs tell me I should have 60% overall function in my left hand, but I've convinced myself they are low-balling me. I'm going to push for more... but my arm is another story. It will not go past 40°, as at 30° my elbow dislocates.
C'est la vie right? I'm lucky to be here & have what I have; I wanted to share my story so maybe someone else won't make the same mistakes
 
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