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Hello all,

I'm still really new at this, but it's time to replace the ancient tires on my bike. Knowing what a fraught question this will be, what's the "best" tires for a newbie? In this case, best doesn't mean high performance at a race track, but maybe safe handling in different conditions (dry and wet), high stability, not too finicky, and easy break-in. I was considering Pirelli Sport Demons but they seem too "advanced", plus the possibility of shaking/vibration issues at some speeds with my 25 year old bike....
 

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hi, if tires are fitted correctly well balanced and the wheel alignment is correct there shouldn't be any vibration just caused just by the tires.
as for type softer compounds grip better but don't last as long. harder compounds last longer but take longer to warm up. how and when you ride will be a big factor also if you only ride in the summer and when it's dry you would be better with a linier summer type tire. if you ride all year round and in the wet one with a compound tread pattern would suit best.
I find Pirelli and Avon good all round tires but that's my choice the last Avon's were brilliant but didn't like white lines in the wet. Michelin B45's seen good all round tires with a good a tread pattern but some don't like them.
 

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Border Kong
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In my limited experience, when I bought my EX it came with Kenda tires. They were not exceptionally good, but they fulfilled the mission of taking me to and from the city without any problems.

When they became square, I changed them for Chinese-made ones (Promoto) which felt as if at any moment they were going to skid in the curves.

After 6 months I changed them for some Michelin Pilot Street bias version (I couldn't find radials in Mexico, and the ones I found doubled the price). It was the best thing I could have done. They have a firm grip in corners and don't feel like the bike is going to skid. With those tires I crossed the "Espinazo del Diablo" (the Mexican equivalent to the tail of the dragon) and I know that I could have gone faster and the tires would have continued within their grip capacity.

Besides that, they are not much more expensive than the Chinese ones I had bought. They cost less than $200 a pair.
 

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Fast Old Guy
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this bike was designed for Bias tires, while it accepts radials, it doesn't like them
FOG
 
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I got the radial Michelins on my EX, they wear great, feathered all the way to the edges and must have oodles of miles left in them. Beauty of the bike is it is inexpensive to operate. Mexican version of the Dragon sounds good :cool:
 

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It's hard to recommend "beginner tyres" because the tyres might be the most important component on the bike before or after Brakes...so it comes to what kind of riding do you do? I'm guessing you probably do mostly paved and some dirt-gravel driveways or shoulders ...aka, where cars go and not wanting to be helpless if it rains. So get the "all-rounder" type similar to what came with the bike from a recognized manufacturer at a middling price.

Look them up and see what's available for your rims.

You can even read some "Tyre Threads" which might help settle between 2 or 3 choices.
 

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Fast Old Guy
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There is no such thing as Beginner tires, I fact
"beginners " Need the best tire ,more than experts. Experts can ride around tire inadequacies or redials than novices. A good set of high performance tires could save your butt on say a side angle RR CROSSING

FOG
 

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Date codes are important on a tyre you buy, just wana throw that out there. I had 12 year old high performance tires on another bike, they only had maybe less than a 1000 miles on them. One day on a morning commute, the pick up truck in front of me got cut off by a driver that must have tried to make a late turn. Well the truck smashed into that car and as I started to apply front brake pressure, I felt the front tyre slide, I let up on the brakes and rode the white line through the smoke/noise and carnage. I did not know what was on my right side but instincts kicked in and I survived.

Reason for the story, the next day I ordered new Michelins for that bike. So, old tyres are like donuts, better fresh than stale.
 

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Tanker Clown
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I agree with FOG on this one. Beginner tires? Anything sticky that gets warm if you back down a driveway. Stickier the better…so long as it doesn’t take maximum type stress to heat up.

Just some unasked for Newb advice:
Two things to never scrimp on; tires and brakes. One can keep you from sliding down the road without warning and the other from running into that stopped car with the non-working brake lights.
 
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84' Goldwing Aspencade, 91' EX500, 98' Ninja 250/17' 300 engine, 07' EX500
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I totally agree with both of you guys.
 

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But "sticky" won't do a bit of good on wet grass or a gravel driveway or sand in a corner. Caution and common sense . The "stickiest" tire is going to be a track tire? A logging trail tire is going to be a dirt bike tire? Neither is ideal for a new rider on the streets of the neighbourhood.

But lots of people like the Demons, avons, bridgestone BT45/BT46. Don't forget the marketing is targetting you.
 

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Tanker Clown
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The "stickiest" tire is going to be a track tire?
False. Read and comprehend.

“Anything sticky that gets warm if you back down a driveway. Stickier the better…so long as it doesn’t take maximum type stress to heat up.”
A track tire takes heating up for it to get sticky. It has to get pushed fairly hard for it to get into its operating temperature range.

A sticky street tire will heat up just riding to the end of the block. It won’t last but maybe 1800-2000 miles but it’ll stick like glue until then.

Notice that I did NOT recommend any particular brand of tire nor a specific one. Just that it isn’t a good idea to scrimp on tires (nor brakes for that matter) because it’s sheer lunacy to send a Newb out on tires that are not particularly friendly to a rider.

Notice I mention friendly to a rider. Not necessarily a Newb. If it takes skill to utilize a given tire then why tell a Newb to use it? If it’s easy for you as a semi experienced rider to use or even a highly experienced one then it’s probably good for a Newb too.

Someone else also pointed out that a Newb should pay attention the tires’ age and to check the date code. This a fair point also as an old tire will go off sooner (fewer heat cycles) than-a newer one.

I’m not talking about 9 or 10 months difference. 3 or 4 years quite possibly. Depends on the quality of said tire. 7 or 8…..definitely. I don’t care who made it.

Again, to any Newb reading this: Don’t scrimp on tires. Don’t buy old ones just because they’re cheap. Don’t buy tires just because they’re cheap.

Do your research and buy the best performing tires you can afford. You can buy that sweet exhaust later. At least you’ll have given yourself the best chance to still be riding later.
 
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Hello all,

I'm still really new at this, but it's time to replace the ancient tires on my bike. Knowing what a fraught question this will be, what's the "best" tires for a newbie? In this case, best doesn't mean high performance at a race track, but maybe safe handling in different conditions (dry and wet), high stability, not too finicky, and easy break-in. I was considering Pirelli Sport Demons but they seem too "advanced", plus the possibility of shaking/vibration issues at some speeds with my 25 year old bike....
they
Bridgestone Battlax BT46 is a good tire I think. It's a bias ply designed for older sport bikes like the 500r. That's what I put on my 500R and they grip and handle much better than the OE tires did.
 

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I have had good luck with Michelin Pilot Street tires. I have had the BIAS ply and they were great. I recently put the same version in radials on my MC. I like them better and am hoping to get mileage out of them.
 
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