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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

Sorry if this has already been asked but I am not sure how to search within the forum.

I am about to change out my rear brake pads and wanted to see what everyone thinks is the best pads for a bike that is driven about 600miles a week.

Thank you
 

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What type of riding? How fast, how aggressive?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
What type of riding? How fast, how aggressive?
I do mostly pavement driving half is curvy roads other half is traffic driving, I split lanes in California so I need to be able to stop quickly, I drive from 40-90mph.
 

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You are probably asking the wrong question. The choice of pads for the front brake will affect braking much more than the rear. This is because in a quick stop most of the weight transfers to the front wheel. The factory purposely designed the rear brake to be weak so as to avoid locking the rear wheel. I just buy cheap organics for the rear. They work fine and last a long time (because they don't have to do very much). If you are relying on the rear to stop, you won't be stopping quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
You are probably asking the wrong question. The choice of pads for the front brake will affect braking much more than the rear. This is because in a quick stop most of the weight transfers to the front wheel. The factory purposely designed the rear brake to be weak so as to avoid locking the rear wheel. I just buy cheap organics for the rear. They work fine and last a long time (because they don't have to do very much). If you are relying on the rear to stop, you won't be stopping quickly.
SO i know what you mean if I need to stop it front brakes. However, I use my rear brake when splitting lanes this causing me to slide but not lose control of the bike. What brakes last the longest in the rear.
 

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I think the organic ones last fine. As much riding that you are doing, you should just always have a new spare front and rear pads on hand at all times.
 

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What [email protected] said...75% of your braking comes from the front brakes! You "should" be using the front way more than the rear brakes. If you ever lock that rear wheel your chances of going down increase significantly. (Don't ask me how I know!!!)
 

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I do mostly pavement driving half is curvy roads other half is traffic driving, I split lanes in California so I need to be able to stop quickly, I drive from 40-90mph.
Smokes, dude! You are in pre-crash condition if you regularly skid between cars! Far better to anticipate direction changes and practice countersteering until it is first nature.



I barely use the rear brake. Have seen too many single rear tire skid marks before impact points. For the rear, just about any organic pad set will do. The front is where the vast majority (90+%) of your braking force is, due to the high center of gravity of the bike and weight transfer. Get "HH" pads for the front. The rear is useful for parking lot speeds and gravel roads/driveways.
 

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My '86 VF500 is still on its original rear brake-pads and they're only 1/2 worn!

Braking-percentage varies depending upon actual braking-force needed. If you want to slow down from 40mph to 39mph in 1/2-mile, you can use both brakes evenly and it'll be 50/50% split. However, the more deceleration-force needed, more and more weight will be transferred to front. At maximum-deceleration possible, which is only dictated by traction-limit of front-tyre, 100% of braking-force comes from front-tyre.



Had perfect example of this yesterday coming off S.F. Bay Bridge splitting in bumper-to-bumper traffic. Was going about 30mph between cars @ 15mph. Right as car-pool lane splits off onto dedicated ramp, some idiot dives into space ahead of me! :surprise: I slam on both brakes and let off rear in milliseconds when it started sliding. I come to stop in about 1.5 car-length and felt back-end bump back down to earth. No way I could've have stopped that quickly without using 100% from front-brake. Rear-brake would've slid at least 150-ft before stopping and I'd be in that car's boot!
 

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SO i know what you mean if I need to stop it front brakes. However, I use my rear brake when splitting lanes this causing me to slide but not lose control of the bike. What brakes last the longest in the rear.

Green...not trying to come off as condescending but what is your riding experience? Have you taken the MSF course, or anything similar? If not I STRONGLY suggest you do - it could save your life! Even those veteran riders can benefit every few years or so from the MSF course(s) as one can develop bad habits over the years and need the reminders!
 

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My personal preference is to buy cheap organics for rear and replace them often. While I understand importance of the front brake stated above and use it accordingly, my rear also gets used a lot--dragged to help in stop and go traffic and some low speed maneuvers. I use more rear (and less front) when it's raining (because I found out the hard way that although a rear wheel skid is dangerous, a front wheel skid, such as occurs when you hit wet oil, is so very much worse). I also use the rear on dirt, gravel, and other less than perfect surfaces (sand sprinkled pavement, etc) for similar reasons. And for normal dry pavement I use both brakes because though the front will stop it just fine on it's own, it keeps me in the practice of using both, so it comes automatically for emergency quick stops. All of this wears out rear pads. I go through a set or two every year.
 
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