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Well hi I'm new to this site and figure give a small story before beginning on.

I've wanted a motorcycle pretty much all my life, and I finally scored one for 500. She didn't run at the time but it was an easy fix. Put her on the trailer and off we went. She's kinda grimy but a simple deep cleaning made things more bright and easy to figure out what was needed and what can be salvageable. Basically it cranks but won't start. Simply put new spark plugs, ignition coils and fresh gas with an oil change and she started right up. She has 56,365 miles and was down once before. No frame damage just hard scrapes on the fairings. Aftermarket carbon fiber exhaust and she's nice and loud.


So here's the current condition: carburetor is out and I cleaned it up and all the little parts. Unfortunately she doesn't like fuel injection so having to mess with a choke isn't my strong suit but hey a bike is a bike :). Before I took the carburetor out I ran her a few times. Took her around the block. The left exhaust pipe has a pop of white smoke every few seconds. She's sits at 1200RPM perfectly for about 10 minutes then shoots up between 2000 and 3000. I shut off the choke after 30 seconds after first starting it. Petcock valve is on main fuel line and I've put brand new parts and gaskets on it. The unfortunate part is I can't get the pilot jets out and clean them since they're completely stuck in the carburetor.

So is a full carb rebuild kit worth it or try to get the 2 pilot jets out? I've tried WD-40, and soaking the whole carburetor in carb cleaner and they're stuck.

Other repairs I've made is a new chain, front and rear sprockets, dampener, brake pads, and fuel cap screws. It does leak out of the gas cap so once I go back to work get a new fuel cap.

Any help is awesome :)
 
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Pilot jet removal is essential, once the heads are stripped, can be so difficult as to require drilling and easy out. It can be done but some experience, "feel" and the right equipment essential in avoiding collateral damage. I stand at the ready with a few options....from just pilot jet removal, to replacement, replacement with a full (and I mean full) refurb service on yours or bolt on, ready to run refurbed carbs my #74 in this link FS refurbed carbset #74
Let me know if interested, needed tools, jets, carb kits in stock, no delays.

Pen Fountain pen Office supplies
 

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Sounds like other then tires and carb service to get it where it is suposed to be your in good shape.
 

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These engines require frequent valve adjustments. The service manual calls for somewhere in the 7,500 mile range for how often they need to be checked. I'd be willing to bet money the valves are way out of spec. I'd put that at the top of the to-do list, along with checking the air filter, changing the oil and filter and bleeding the front and rear brakes, or at least checking the condition of the brake fluid.

The next big important service is all the linkages in the rear unitrak, which is all the stuff in the rear shock/suspension. The grease dries out and can start to damage the bushing sleeves right around the mileage you've got. Pop everything out, clean and re-grease. The exception is the main swingarm pivot. They don't seem to suffer the same issue and I have yet to encounter one in bad condition, though it wouldn't hurt to check. You'll have to get creative with supporting the bike, the center stand needs to be removed to access the bolt attaching the main unitrak linkage to the frame.
Check the wheel bearings too. If they've been replaced at least once before, you're probably fine. If not, you're probably not fine.
Check the steering head bearings too. It's a crap shoot with those on what condition they'll be in. I've seen 50,000 mile bikes with perfect bearings and 20,000 mile bikes with rusty and pitted bearings.

That's about it for big important stuff to get you, and keep you, riding and on the road. 56,000 miles is quite a lot for an EX500, at least as far as the intended use from the manufacturer, but shouldn't discourage you from keeping the bike and riding it. Staying on top of all the regular services (oil changes, valve adjustments, etc) and the semi-regular services (rear suspension linkages, front forks, air filter, etc) will keep the bike running for many more years to come.

The best single thing you can do for your bike though is storing it inside, especially during inclement weather. Don't give water a chance to work its way past seals and destroy critical parts.
 

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I can attest that valves can be quite out of spec on high mileage bikes. I bought mine with 13 or 14k miles and had the valves done around 15k and they were seriously out of spec. @ducatiman can attest to how bad they were
 

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More likely to be out of spec on a low mileage EX.
I've got my
EX colors back ;)
 

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Thats probable for high mileage bikes that the owner still rides, but based on my experiences with used vehicles, they would likely just give up on paying for or doing maintenance when they decide to sell it. Perhaps I'm just unlucky and/or bad at selecting vehicles
 
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