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Discussion Starter #21
Makes too much sense, can't possibly work.
Now that I've gone through the process of removing and working on the carbs for the first time... holy crap! Look at those handy little Allen-head screws on the bottom of the carbs for draining the float bowls. Might actually be easy. And I wouldn't be in this predicament if I bothered to learn that before.

Yup, I made sure I cleaned them as part of the rebuild. Nicely unblocked.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
First carb reassembly complete! Switched the diaphragm and it fit like a glove.

Of course, I might have the same problem when I reassemble the second carb in the morning. Hair dryer is on standby.
 

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Discussion Starter #23 (Edited)
IT'S ALIVE! BIKE FIRES UP!

Second carb reassembled.

With some trial and error, linked the two carbs back together. Diagram with part numbers is here.

Lessons learned:

  • Don't worry until later about the springs that popped out during disassembly. (92081D. 92081A and 92081C). I had no problem getting them in place after the carbs were re-connected.
  • Leave the two support bars (11044 and 11044A) until last. Even hooking them up to only one carb, they will either be in the way or just plain impossible to slide into place on the other carb.
  • You put new o-rings on the fuel rail, didn't you?
  • You can hook up the choke support bar 13168 first. Lots of play to allow movement back and forth to get the fuel rail/tube (92005) and fitting tube (92005A) in place after.
  • Before pushing the carbs back together, be sure that the metal tab on the throttle of the left carb 11044B is going in between tabs on the throttle bracket of the right carb. On the diagram, it's the part sticking out of the left side of the right carb closest to the two screws 92081A and 92081C.
  • For spring 92081D, the smaller hook goes in the little hole on that tab sticking out of choke rail 13168. Don't bother looking for a hole for the other end of the spring like I did. With the spring lying horizontally, the other fits perfectly around the body of the right-hand carb.
  • You know you've pushed the fuel rail in far enough when you can get get the support bars' screws threaded back in through the holes.
Once it's re-assembled,. don't be so excited to get it back on the bike that you forget to hook up the two throttle cables first. Trust me on that one. Don't waste your time going down to the basement to dig up those extra long curved-end needle nose pliers that you think might do the job with the carb mounted. Just pull the damn carb again and don't waste your time.

If you only put a little gas in the tank... Reserve setting on the petcock. Duh on me.

As ducatiman mentioned a few posts ago, the vacuum on the carbs needs to be synched. After reading up on the different ways of doing it, I'm looking forward to trying the plastic-hose-with-some-fluid-in-it method. The logic, simplicity and funkiness of it makes it too good not to try.
 

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well done you have serviced your carbs for the first time and learned a few good lessons and ideas.
when you have have done them a few more times it gets easier.

I found a few handy things out while doing carbs. worth remembering for the novice perhaps.

Preparation.
before you even think about taking the carbs off. get some good service kits. the ones @ducatiman does are excellent which includes all you need for a full service including all new button screws to replace those easily stripped JIS screws.
(I get mine direct from Japan) but only because of the postal charges from the US. these kits contain a full set of everything (except screws which I have loads of) inc jets. needles. and all internal components. call me lazy but new ones don't need cleaning. I do that later for spares ;).
take photos the first time of where things fit it's better to have a reference if you forget something.
I use two containers for bits removed a big one for the left carb (to include all the only one of parts for both carbs) and smaller one for the right hand carb. good fitting lids stops loosing any parts.

Servicing.
I tend to split the carbs first. putting stuff in the big container. just my choice it is easier to work on one carb at a time as my ultrasonic cleaner isn't big enough for both carbs.
make sure all parts are good and clean before reassembly. replace all O rings every time. set the floats at 17mm only as a guide you must wet test them when serviced, the fuel level should be even and between 1mm above or on the joint line (both carbs). set the mixture screws to 2.1/2 turns out from seated. (but you may have fine tune them later.
you can do an approximation balance. when assembled by holding the carbs up to a light source then setting the left hand carb with the idle screw so you can just see light around the throttle valve. (or use a thin feeler) then adjust the balance screw so the right carb is the same and they are even.
good advice here fit a rail filter (ducatiman kits have them I believe) part # 49019-1085 . you may regret it later if you don't. and fit the fuel line to the carbs before fitting the carbs to the bike.

adjustment.
once the carbs are fitted to the bike you may wish to adjust the mixtures and check the balance. if you use a manometer like the one in the video. do not use water (coloured or otherwise) it is too thin. use coloured oil red TQF or green engine oil anything that is thicker (even old black engine oil). the reason for this is if you forget one of the above or you carbs are wildly out of sync or one of the vac lines is not tight it will suck the water into the engine. (you only ever do this once) :mad:
 

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Discussion Starter #25
yorkie, you ain't kidding about the prep and workspace required.

Because of all the warnings, I set up a half sheet of plywood as dedicated table for this project. Lots of space for work, tools, manuals, print-outs and assorted parts and soaking bins.

I did most of the disassembly in a big foil turkey roasting pan from the dollar store to catch all the falling bits and prevent them from rolling on the floor. Best dollar I ever spent.

Other tips from trial and error and other sources that you don't get from fancy book learnin':
  • Impact wrench for the really stubborn or tight access screws. Rest the opposite side of the carb nice and flat on a block of wood
  • Rip the bristles out of a wire brush to clean the tiny jet holes. Look for one with brass bristles because they are softer and really, really tiny.
  • I could not find carb cleaner in quart/litre or larger containers so I alternated between carb cleaner spray and SeaFoam. That combo worked really well. It took some time, but even the tiniest jet passages came clean.
  • Chop the top off a 4 litre/gallon windshield washer fluid, vinegar or oil jug and it's the perfect size for soaking the carbs. Cover with foil to reduce evaporation.
Perhaps I should consider doing an update to dalemac's carb tutorial with all the tips I got from everyone. When the snow comes. If I survive. Because at some point, my wife will come after me when she notices all the missing plastic tubs, funnels and yogurt containers.
 

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yeah it is a steep learning curve the first time but as I said it gets easier as you know basically what to expect next time.
one point though I never use carb cleaner (no idea about seafoam it is not a product wildly available here) because it loves to eat any rubber and certain (if not all plastics) there are a few rubber/plastic bits in the carbs so best to avoid it.
 
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