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Tanker Clown
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Discussion Starter · #841 ·
I did not. Mike got the 851 and we rode together a few times after he got it.

I asked how he thought it felt compared to the GSXR. He said if the GSXR felt like riding on a knife edge, the 851 felt like a chalk board eraser.

IOW, where the GSXR felt like you were on the edge of traction all the time, the 851 was so far this side of the limit you had bags more room before you got to its limit.

I got a test ride on an 888 and was so tentative riding it (it wasn’t my bike and I wasn’t gonna crash it) I didn’t think it anything special at the time.

I most certainly didn’t push the limits of either myself, the bike nor available traction. Things I did note were what I later learned were characteristics of almost every Ducati I‘ve ridden since.

First is a perceived reluctance to tip in fully. Like you’re pushing the tire over an edge. Once over though, dead stable. Like you could take both hands off the bars stable.

Few Ducatis I’ve ridden since do not share that trait. Second is a near non functional rear brake. Yeah, it’ll keep you from rolling back in a hill but that’s it.

Lastly it felt so skinny between my knees it almost felt like my knees might touch. This is compared to my ZX7 at the time….but kinda holds true even with my 996.

Everything save the riding position felt easier and more accessible than my ZX7. The 888 riding position felt more committed but everything else worked with less effort.

It shifted smoother and easier with less pressure on the lever. It braked with ease. Speed scrubbed off with less effort at the lever.

Bottom end grunt was amazing so getting up to speed was easier and quicker. Steering took more effort initially but less through the corner and virtually non to keep it on my chosen line.

That’s about all I can remember from my short ride on it. Maybe that should be todays BOD?
 

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Tanker Clown
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Discussion Starter · #842 ·
Tire Wheel Fuel tank Vehicle Automotive lighting


The 888. Only on the market from 1992 to 1994 it is perhaps the rarest of Ducati’s Desmo Quattro Superbikes.

Production was cut short in mid 1994 as the 916 took center stage. Essentially it was only built for about a year and a half.

There were a number of special editions built but most were excluded from the US market. The SP (sport production) versions are more rare yet.

The rarest of the bunch being the SP4S which had a full Öhlins suspension and a carbon tank. Just 100 of those were built.

The SP3 had an alloy tank as did the first “run of the mill” SP4s. Later the SP5 came along with more power and better brakes but a steel tank.

The “Strada” was the same as the SP5 but with a pillion provision versus a solo saddle.

Those were the 2 versions imported to the US. For the US they were badged as the Strada and SPO. AFAIK, the SPO was a Strada with the SP5s suspension and solo saddle.

Apparently they were only available in the US as road bikes beginning in 1993. The SP2, SP3 and SP4 were available in the rest of the world from 1991 on.

The SPO was created because the SP5 couldn’t pass US emissions and the SPO homologated the 888 to race in AMA Superbikes.

A total of approximately 7,900 were made across all years of production. The 1991 bikes were actually 851s externally. The first with the 888 badges and bodywork appearing in the 1992 MY.
 

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Tanker Clown
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Discussion Starter · #843 · (Edited)
And now for something a wee bit different. No less unobtanium though:
Wheel Tire Fuel tank Motorcycle Automotive lighting


Fritz Egli, accomplished Swiss engineer began building tuned Vincent powered motorcycles back in the 1960s.

This particular Egli Vincent is of a much more recent vintage as a Frenchman named Patrick Godet received special permission from Fritz himself to produce limited numbers of Egli Vincents.

The stock Vincent 50 degree V Twins are bored and stroked out to 1330 ccs. The original welded spine frame Egli created is faithfully reproduced from tube steel and nickel plated.

As previously stated, you might call these “unobtanium”. Fritz Egli only built about 100 of them. Godet produced a limited number each year, for a total of 250 examples.

He passed away in 2018 so there aren’t anymore being made.

These routinely trade between $90 and $120K though some have gaveled at auction for mid $60K numbers.

The punched out Vincent engine makes 100 hp and the Godet Egli Vincent only weighs in at 372 lbs.
 
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Tanker Clown
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Discussion Starter · #844 · (Edited)
Tire Wheel Fuel tank Automotive fuel system Motorcycle


The original Hans Muth designed Suzuki Katana from the 80s. Those of us who were around for the original release will note that this bike is not stock.

This tidy resto mod is the work of a company called ACP Customs in Ontario, Canada.

Note the modern radial brakes and forged wheels suspended from top shelf Öhlins dampers.

The exhaust is hand welded titanium, while the swing arm is a braced version from Over Racing in Japan.

The frame was braced to handle the 1200cc over bore of the stock 1100 mill. Add in the Keihin flat slides and up to date electronics, it’s a whole new bike.

Tire Wheel Automotive parking light Motorcycle Automotive tire


If you’d like to read more, click the link below:
 

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Tanker Clown
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Discussion Starter · #845 ·
Tire Wheel Fuel tank Vehicle Motorcycle


1984 ZX750R Turbo. Built from 1983 to 1985 at the height of the turbo bike craze, it features a 738cc air-cooled inline 4. Equipped with electronic fuel injection it made a claimed 95 hp at 9000 rpm.

This made it the fastest of the factory turbo bikes of the 1980s. Motorcycle press of the day clocked a 146 mph top speed. Weighing in at 556lbs it was no light weight.

In the days of the turbo bikes, this was not one to dismiss. While it had the power and top speed, the Suzuki XN-85 was noted by the same press as the best handling of the bunch.

The period handling fads were a 16” front wheel and anti-dive forks, and the ZX750 Turbo was equipped with both. Riding impressions I’ve read that talk about odd handling are probably down to both.
 
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View attachment 55417

1984 ZX750R Turbo. Built from 1983 to 1985 at the height of the turbo bike craze, it features a 738cc air-cooled inline 4. Equipped with electronic fuel injection it made a claimed 95 hp at 9000 rpm.

This made it the fastest of the factory turbo bikes of the 1980s. Motorcycle press of the day clocked a 146 mph top speed. Weighing in at 556lbs it was no light weight.

In the days of the turbo bikes, this was not one to dismiss. While it had the power and top speed, the Suzuki XN-85 was noted by the same press as the best handling of the bunch.

The period handling fads were a 16” front wheel and anti-dive forks, and the ZX750 Turbo was equipped with both. Riding impressions I’ve read that talk about odd handling are probably down to both.
oooo do you guys by any chance know how much it cost to buy one of these stateside back in 84? since it's over 700cc, it had the tariffs right? which as i understand it is why the suzuki xn-85 and honda cx650t were both <700cc. recently saw this cx650t for sale down in santa clara... designs of the times. love it.
 

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Tanker Clown
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Discussion Starter · #847 · (Edited)
It was more of a nostalgia BOD, just because. It isn’t a bike I’d recommend to anyone as a daily rider or really, even a weekend road warrior.

They’re not exactly user friendly compared to anything newer than 1989. They also are nearly impossible to find parts for.

Beyond being a collectors item from the age of the turbo bikes none of them make for much more than a conversation piece at your local bike night.

I have one of them and that’s really all it will ever be for me. Even then, my plans include modern forks and a 17” front wheel, along with a modern turbo, wider rear wheel, 520 chain conversion, MOSFET regulator and Shorai battery.

If you’re looking to spend money on one, I’d honestly look for a naturally aspirated ZX750R from 88 or later. It’s a better motorcycle and not near impossible to find parts for. Alternatively, a GS 750 Suzuki or a CB900 Super Sport.
recently saw this cx650t for sale down in santa clara... designs of the times. love it.
I’m not sure but that doesn’t seem to be the stock paint job the old CX’s came with. That alone would make it worth less than premium money in my opinion.

Most of the old turbo bikes sell for more than they ought to. $5500 is too much, IMHO. As motorcycles go there are far better ones from the same era.
 
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Tanker Clown
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Discussion Starter · #848 ·
The CX650 Turbo I remember looked like this:


The one in that Imgur pic looks like it has CX500 paintwork.
 
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The CX650 Turbo I remember looked like this:


The one in that Imgur pic looks like it has CX500 paintwork.
i love that this was taken in the kitchen haha. now that you mention it i can't find any other pictures of a cx650 with that paint. weird. and yeah, 5.5k does seem steep but it's not at the store anymore so guess it got moved. i agree there's definitely better bikes out there... buuut technology is cool and the 80s were wild. definitely great conversation pieces though!
 

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Discussion Starter · #850 ·
$5500 IS steep. I don’t think they were that much new. I don’t remember exactly as I couldn’t afford anything but the low end used bikes back then.

Honestly though, I was in the depths of my Harley infatuation then anyway and didn’t pay much attention to other bike prices.

I remember seeing a few of the CX 650 Turbos about but as I remember there weren’t that many of them built.

I’ve seen plenty of CX500s though so there were plenty of those on the road. The one I remember most clearly was painted much like the one in the picture but had a neon orange “TURBO” on the side.

I remember most of the ones I saw looking like that.

Don’t get me wrong, my previous post was simply my opinion on buying a turbo bike from back then.

They aren’t ever going to be big money collector bikes. Not like certain Special Edition Homologation bikes already are.

People ask crazy money for them but not a whole lot of collectors are buying. They’re just not that desirable.

If you’re going to drop $5500 on a bike as an investment, find yourself a Ducati 748. Or better yet, a 996. Those are actually increasing in value as I type this.

If someone GIVES you a turbo bike, sure spend a little bit of money on it, make it look nice and period correct and ride it to your local bike nite.

If you are really looking to buy one…..well it’s your money. Just don’t complain that no one warned you off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #851 ·


2002, Ducati 748S Senna. Zero difference to any other 748S but only 250 were built with this matte titanium gray w/red wheels.

Built as an homage to the late Ayrton Senna who was himself a huge fan of Ducatis. Hands down my favorite of the 748s.
 
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Discussion Starter · #852 · (Edited)
Todays Bike of the Day:



1995 YZF750R. The last of Yamaha’s road going 750 sport bikes. The YZF would be built, unchanged for another couple of years before the YZF R1 appeared.

Yamaha would build just one more 750 homologato special, the R7 before SBK rules changed and the 750s were no longer.

The R7 was not sold in vast numbers as it existed solely to allow Yamaha to enter it into WSBK competition.

The YZF750R would be raced by American Colin Edwards and team mate Yasutomo Nagai until Nagai’s untimely death after an accident at Assen in 1995.

Colin would be joined by Scott Russell a year later in 1997. Nori Haga would join Russell for 1998 aboard the R7.

The YZF750R was the last 750cc pure sport bike sold to the general riding public by Yamaha. It was all R6s and R1s after that.

Yamaha could have restyled the 750R, particularly the rear end. The R7 had already taken over on the track. As the Superbike class no longer included 750s, Yamaha dropped the 750 entirely
 
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1983 CB1100F restomod by Tom Kerxhalli of Tom's Cycle Recycling. Converted to single shock, CBR600RR swinger, VFR750F forks, 17s and better brakes. and bored from 1062cc to 1123cc. Featured in Dennis Kirk's "Garage Build" pages.


Wheel Fuel tank Tire Automotive fuel system Plant
 
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Discussion Starter · #854 ·
Thanks for posting!! I gotta say though,those years of Hondas……that tank-seat-side panel relationship always looked wonky to me. Classic 80s for sure though.
 

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Thanks for posting!! I gotta say though,those years of Hondas……that tank-seat-side panel relationship always looked wonky to me. Classic 80s for sure though.
Look at the last 2-valve CB750, then look at the Hondas of the 90s and it begins to make more sense.
 
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Border Kong
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2022 Ninja ZX-25R ABS KRT


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Kawasaki is proud to present: The New Ninja ZX-25R (Limited Edition) an all-new 250cc super sports car powered by the only inline four engine in its class. A shining example of the performance offered by Ninja ZX machines, this long-awaited model was created for demanding, sport-minded customers who yearn for a high-potential street machine for any track.

This next year a new Kawasaki Ninja ZX250R will go on sale for the Latin American market. According to the official Kawasaki LA website, this motorcycle will offer all the technology available for machines with + 600cm3 engines but with a 249cm3, 4-cylinder, 16-valve engine. The 11.5: 1 compression ratio and, according to Kawasaki, a red line over 17000RPM suggests it will be a high performance machine.

The only drawback that I find in this model is the price. With a starting price of mx$224,990.00 (US$10,800) it is almost twice as expensive as a Ninja 400.
 
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Thanks for posting!! I gotta say though,those years of Hondas……that tank-seat-side panel relationship always looked wonky to me. Classic 80s for sure though.
I think my taste in motorcycles followed my taste in music. Stuff from the 70's was cool, I really loved stuff from the 80's, and feel it peaked in the 90's. Since then not much moves or inspires me.

I really like the styling of the Honda in the picture, the UK got multiple bikes from 250cc all the way up in that same styling.

Yup, just call me an old fart. :)
 

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This next year a new Kawasaki Ninja ZX250R will go on sale for the Latin American market. According to the official Kawasaki LA website, this motorcycle will offer all the technology available for machines with + 600cm3 engines but with a 249cm3, 4-cylinder, 16-valve engine. The 11.5: 1 compression ratio and, according to Kawasaki, a red line over 17000RPM suggests it will be a high performance machine.
they did exactly the same thing with the GPZ500s here in Europe that designated mark was for the EX500. twin, but for other markets the GPZ500s was a 4cyl 498cc engine (a scaled down GPZ 550) built into a GPX 600 frame and body kit, you see one now and again (grey import) but are very rare.
 

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Discussion Starter · #859 ·
I think my taste in motorcycles followed my taste in music. Stuff from the 70's was cool, I really loved stuff from the 80's, and feel it peaked in the 90's. Since then not much moves or inspires me.

I really like the styling of the Honda in the picture, the UK got multiple bikes from 250cc all the way up in that same styling.

Yup, just call me an old fart. :)
I agree with much of that. For me some 70s stuff was cool…or at least, cool to see or look at. I feel the same about the early 80s.

Mid 80s is where things picked up for me as being aesthetically appealing to my left brain. 90s certainly were the peak for me, but it last into the early 2Ks.

Anything after around 2005…..I mostly lost interest. Most Ducatis up to the present appeal to me on some level though I probably wouldn’t go out and buy one.

About the only modern bike released in the last 2-3 years that makes me “think” I’d want one is Aprilia’s RS660.

Pretty much everything else is just too much. Too much tech, too much power and too much money.

The early 80s Hondas just have a funky aesthetic to them. There’s like this demarcation line where everything after that was way cool aesthetically.

It’s like the difference between an 86 and 87 Magna. One has a generic UJM style to it, while the other has moxie and aesthetically pleasing lines.
This


Versus this:
 

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Discussion Starter · #860 · (Edited)
Keeping with the Honda theme for the moment, todays Bike of the Day:

2010 Honda VT750RSA Shadow. If you’re thinking to yourself, why? Read on.

The Shadow RS bears a striking resemblance to an 883 Harley. Completely intentional on Hondas part.

Same for the red/white/blue paint. Honda did this to tap into their dirt track heritage. If you’re thinking; Honda has a dirt track heritage? The answer is yes. And five AMA dirt track championships too.

American racer Ricky Graham from Carmel California won Hondas 1st dirt track title in 1984 riding for the factory team. Despite that, Honda dropped him after an injury riddled 1985 season.

Bubba Shobert went on to win 3 titles in row for the factory Honda team, in 1985, 86 and 87.

In 1993, Ricky Graham made a come back campaign riding a privateer Honda RS750. He won a second title aboard a Honda and 12 races that season. Six of them in a row. This, at a time when Honda no longer supported the RS with parts.

Sadly Ricky Graham died in a house fire back in 1998. Bubba Shobert’s racing career ended on the front straight at Laguna Seca in 1988.



This is the dirt track heritage Honda was tapping into. While sales were not what one would call stellar, I find it the best looking of all the Shadow iterations.

It made a paltry 38 hp from its 3 valve 745cc engine and weighed over 500lbs. The tank only held 2.8 gallons so stops for gas were frequent. On the upside, it is injected.
 
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