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Discussion Starter #1
Thought this might be of interest to the group. I have been using a pair of work boots for my riding boots...steel toes, 3/4 length Redwings which are very sturdy, and stiff. I had been lacing them up tightly to the top, thinking that the more secure the better for protection purposes. Then I developed what I thought was a shinsplint in my left leg, and it was causing me a good deal of pain, to the point of needing to ride in a cart rather than walking for golf. I systematically started checking all the things that contribute to shinsplints, i.e. cushioning in shoes, etc. Finally I noticed that it was worse the next day after I had gone riding, and a light bulb came on...the shifting motion from my left ankle was irritating the muscle on the outside of my left shin, and once I stopped lacing tightly to the top all the symptoms disappeared. Don't know if anyone else has experienced something like this, but I am so glad I figured this out, as I was just about ready to go to an orthopedic doctor, and I'm sure that would have cost me dearly. ninjamon
 

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I had various problems with foot circulation when I first ran cross-country (late '60's). Finally solved it with snug lace tension near the toes and just medium tension the rest of the way up.

In the 90's I had some problems with ball-of-foot numbness & stingers... which went away with looser lacing/straps over the top of the foot.

So your story makes sense.
 

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After some 15 years as an Infantryman, and on jump status. I've gone through the same thing. The key is to tighten the laces that cover your foot up to the ankle, then loose but firm all the way up your shin. It keeps the bottom from slipping around on road marches and but allows circulation through your calves and shins.

Another way you can make sure you are doing it right...is when you lace up the top of your boot, raise your foot up. Like you would when you are shifting (both feet) that makes sure your calves are flexed and sets the laces just right.

Plus as you exercise or use your muscles, the blood pressure makes your extremeties swell making the symptoms worse.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the responses guys...I'd be willing to bet that a lot of people develop some unexplained aches/pains due to this. In my case I feel like I kind of lucked into the reason for the pain, and got it taken care of right away. Glad to see I'm not the only one...misery loves company ;) . ninjamon
 

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On a different foot-related line...

After WWII, my non-combat Dad came back from Guam with some foot fungus that never went away. The only stuff that made summer evening life bearable, after his shoes were off (we had no A/C) was medicated Mexana powder (WalMart has it, Walgreens?). I use it as armpit deodorant & foot powder to this day.

Plus, USAF basic training, San Antonio, August '73 (hot & humid)... the instructors REQUIRED that we switched boots each day... no wearing the same boots/chukkas 2 or more days in a row. This let the boots dry out thoroughly & reduced any chance of foot diseases. We sure as heck kept the showers clean too.

Oh... anyone with baby girls: there's some recent research out showing some connection with using talcum powder on baby girls bottoms & future ovarian cancer.
http://www.preventcancer.com/consumers/cosmetics/talc.htm
 
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