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Hello all. I’m going to be replacing my clutch pretty soon and was wondering what brands of clutch are better than others. I don’t race my bike or stunt, that being said do I just get OEM? Tell me what you think.
 

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I only go with OEM for stuff I own. Might be nice to get new springs as well. Usually the steel plates are ok, I get stuff for ten percent over cost, so I go for everything, don't forget a gasket too.
 

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depends on your bike you haven't done a intro so we have no idea what it is. old beat up or like new. and why would you think need a new clutch there so reliable. mines a gen 1 with 89k on the original engine, clutch is fine.
 

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I Have several replacement, but have used none of them. Vesrah, Moto Technica, Barnett. Barnett made their name in the 60s and 70s via racing. Bear in mind that the EX clutch is the one place where Kawasaki is loaded for bear. Those same plates are used in the KZ900 and I think one of the 1000cc models. You see why they take much abuse in the 500. More likely, I would think, that you need fresh clutch springs. Those were marginal when new and the innumerable heating/cooling cycles along with constant compression causes them to sack, or shorten, dropping their pressure.
 
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depends on your bike you haven't done a intro so we have no idea what it is. old beat up or like new. and why would you think need a new clutch there so reliable. mines a gen 1 with 89k on the original engine, clutch is fine.
89,000 that's a mileage champ for sure. My gen2 EX started slipping at around 20,000 miles.(I was using it for stop and go commuting) I usually shift the bike at 5-6000 RPMs - I don't beat on my vee-hickles generally. I did do the clutch on my high mileage VFR 750 and the only difference I noticed was around 125mph it might have had a little more gitty up and go.

I took the EX out to a local flea market yesterday; it was around a 50 mile round trip, all highway. I was surprised at one point riding home as I had a nice clear road and wanted to get by some cars that were in the right lane, I was holding the throttle wide open for a minute maybe and was shocked to see 11,000 RPM and 130MPH! Usually, when I hold the throttle open, I usually back off around 10,000RPMs and 120MPH or so. This is a relatively new engine, initial break in with a machined head. 600 mile service, re-torqued head. I want to say that I must have 4000 miles on it currently. Bike itself has 50,000 miles. Its a terrific machine when you do a few modifications to suit your riding/tastes.
 

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89,000 that's a mileage champ for sure. My gen2 EX started slipping at around 20,000 miles
yeah I suppose it is. I got the bike 7years ago with 53k on it as a project. (stood 6 years) and during the complete rebuild of course had the engine out to do all the usual stuff to it. there was basically nothing wrong with it.
no wear on the top end and virtually no indicated wear in the bores. (perhaps 2 or 3 thou) only wear point was the primary chain but while is was stretched a little not worth a strip down to change it. the clutch was also good just a little sticky from being stood so long. but once the plates were cleaned and flattened on a slab of granite came up like new with no wear these were left soaking in engine oil while I rebuild the engine. I did notice the springs were a little weak when tested so changed them for a set of ZZR600 ones I had from the lads bike. of course It's a bit harder to pull but works fine. and of course is kept adjusted correctly. 36k since rebuild and it still feels like a new bike. yes I get the odd false neutral and the primary chain rattles when cold. suppose I should have changed the box for a gen 2 and fitted a new chain but it will do for me. it would probably have passed the 100k mark by now had it not been for the Kung flu and lockdowns. perhaps by next year it will. just depends on circumstances at my age every years riding is bonus.

to be honest I have read a lot of posts about issues with the clutch and not taken much notice it is one part of the bike Kawasaki went overboard on, fitting one from a 900 to the EX with half the power. apart from complaints of the clutch sticking after being stood not many end up having to be replaced I suspect these have been abused a lot or not been adjusted correctly. even if the present owner has been careful there is no accounting for previous owners.
 

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yeah I suppose it is. I got the bike 7years ago with 53k on it as a project. (stood 6 years) and during the complete rebuild of course had the engine out to do all the usual stuff to it. there was basically nothing wrong with it.
no wear on the top end and virtually no indicated wear in the bores. (perhaps 2 or 3 thou) only wear point was the primary chain but while is was stretched a little not worth a strip down to change it. the clutch was also good just a little sticky from being stood so long. but once the plates were cleaned and flattened on a slab of granite came up like new with no wear these were left soaking in engine oil while I rebuild the engine. I did notice the springs were a little weak when tested so changed them for a set of ZZR600 ones I had from the lads bike. of course It's a bit harder to pull but works fine. and of course is kept adjusted correctly. 36k since rebuild and it still feels like a new bike. yes I get the odd false neutral and the primary chain rattles when cold. suppose I should have changed the box for a gen 2 and fitted a new chain but it will do for me. it would probably have passed the 100k mark by now had it not been for the Kung flu and lockdowns. perhaps by next year it will. just depends on circumstances at my age every years riding is bonus.

to be honest I have read a lot of posts about issues with the clutch and not taken much notice it is one part of the bike Kawasaki went overboard on, fitting one from a 900 to the EX with half the power. apart from complaints of the clutch sticking after being stood not many end up having to be replaced I suspect these have been abused a lot or not been adjusted correctly. even if the present owner has been careful there is no accounting for previous owners.
My donor engine had 600 miles on it, it was an 04 same as the bike it was going in. The plates would stick on it, over time and just riding the bike, it seems to be less. The only problem would be when you start the bike from dead cold, and snick it into first gear from neutral, it would stall. Someone tole me to put the front wheel against a sturdy wall and just burn out the tyre. I just live with it, it only does it if the bike sits for more than a few weeks which is an oddity. I did replace the starter clutch on two of these engines, which is easy enough to do.
 

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My donor engine had 600 miles on it, it was an 04 same as the bike it was going in. The plates would stick on it, over time and just riding the bike, it seems to be less. The only problem would be when you start the bike from dead cold, and snick it into first gear from neutral, it would stall. Someone tole me to put the front wheel against a sturdy wall and just burn out the tyre. I just live with it, it only does it if the bike sits for more than a few weeks which is an oddity. I did replace the starter clutch on two of these engines, which is easy enough to do.
Engine off. Place it is first. Pull the clutch lever. Rock the bike back and forth 3-4 times. Done. Alternatively, you can clutch it in neutral and rev the engine 2-3 times. Clutch plates with no spring pressure on them will slip before they can accelerate the transmission shafts and gears.
 

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Engine off. Place it is first. Pull the clutch lever. Rock the bike back and forth 3-4 times. Done. Alternatively, you can clutch it in neutral and rev the engine 2-3 times. Clutch plates with no spring pressure on them will slip before they can accelerate the transmission shafts and gears.
Engine off. Place it is first. Pull the clutch lever. Rock the bike back and forth 3-4 times. Done. Alternatively, you can clutch it in neutral and rev the engine 2-3 times. Clutch plates with no spring pressure on them will slip before they can accelerate the transmission shafts and gears.
I have a Yamaha YSR50 that used to be parked in my bedroom (just to illustrate how nice it is) this bike since it was not being used on a regular basis, I would always snick it into second gear and with clutch in, rock the bike back and forth till the plates broke free and the bike would role with the clutch in while in gear. Once that was done, the bike could be duck walked in first gear, fuel on, ignition on, choke on, and it would start in 20 feet. Used to use this bike as a training tool back in my road racing days, there was a shifter cart track close by where six of use with these mini motos used to run these bikes on their closed course. Full leathers and knee pucks were de riguer.


I did this drill on the EX a few times with success, don't know if it matters or helps the bike last longer or anything really.
 

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