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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok so I have an 06 and it hasn't gotten much seat time lately. I let it run at least once a week and usually drive it around the neighborhood but nothing more than that. It really hasn't been driven at all for the last month or so due to weather. The bike started to "jump" a little when shifting into first but nothing serious. I tried to take it for a spin the other day and the engine died each time i shifted into first from a stop. I tightened the clutch cable at the engine and at the lever with no results. Just looking for some advice before throwing money at the problem.

ps I have noticed that the clutch has a very light pull since I got my new bike

Thanks for any help.
 

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Re: Clutch not fully disengaging the engine

My first guess, since you've already tried to fix it from the cable side to no avail, is that it would be the clutch spring. I'm pretty new to this bike, too, but that's my educated guess! :)
 

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Re: Clutch not fully disengaging the engine

Theres a clutch safety switch AND the kickstand switch. Make sure they are plugged in all the way and clean. They may require internal cleaning with contact cleaner sprayed into it. Clutch switch is on underside of clutch lever and kickstand switch is on backside of kickstand. You'll probably find a loose or dirty connection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Re: Clutch not fully disengaging the engine

Kwotes- I was thinking (hoping) it was something relatively inexpensive and easy like clutch springs as well.

Florida- The bike is not just stalling when I shift like it would if i left the side stand down. It is lurching forward when I shift out of neutral as if the clutch wasn't pulled in. I have a feeling if I was rolling downhill when I shift into first the bike would not stall. I will check the switches tomorrow though.

Thanks for the input both of you
 

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Re: Clutch not fully disengaging the engine

Ok well knowing that then i would look at cable adjustment, travel, and maybe look at an oil change to rule out the old energy conserving oil problem.
 

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Re: Clutch not fully disengaging the engine

EX clutches are huge for the engine size. as a result they don't get "Used" enough, they get kind of fuzzy, Do a few race starts. IE; hold 10,000 RPM as you slip the clutch just enough to keep the front wheel 2 " off the ground untill 2nd gear. Repeat 3 time and you clutch will be fine.

OR put the front wheel against a stone wall hold 10,000 RPM the stall the engine with the clutch .repeat 3 times. Same result.

FOG
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Re: Clutch not fully disengaging the engine

Florida- the oil is very new, cables adjusted, and I'm not sure what you mean by travel.

Fog- I can't tell if you're being sarcastic. I've never heard of that before. Anyway, even with the clutch fully pulled in the bike wants to GO. I can't shift out of neutral even with the clutch pulled in because the bike will lurch forward and stall. Any advice?
 

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Re: Clutch not fully disengaging the engine

I am serious. See the picture of me eating those two Honda s at a start at the Old Bridgehampton Racetrack, way back in 1993.

FOG
 

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Re: Clutch not fully disengaging the engine

PapperTapper said:
Florida- the oil is very new, cables adjusted, and I'm not sure what you mean by travel.

Fog- I can't tell if you're being sarcastic. I've never heard of that before. Anyway, even with the clutch fully pulled in the bike wants to GO. I can't shift out of neutral even with the clutch pulled in because the bike will lurch forward and stall. Any advice?
Travel is the limit in both directions of the clutch (or any) movable lever. There's one at top of the engine for the clutch. The hand lever travel needs to match the travel on that lever to disengage the clutch when pulled in. There are adjusters on both the top and bottom levers. It all needs to jive. Now there's a word I haven't used in awhile. I think you just need to tighten the bottom adjuster to allow the clutch to fully disengage. Sounds like your adjuster is all the way tight on top but the cable is still not tight enough to release the clutch so you need to tighten it further on the bottom adjuster. Make the top lever in the middle of its travel when its all adjusted and working properly that way you can make fine adjustments on the top lever to fully tweak the clutch operation. I know, a lot of words for a very simple concept.

You say your cables are adjusted properly but yet your clutch isn't disengaging. This is contradictory unless its just the plates sticking together from sitting too long. So its either one or the other. I was trying to explain to you how to adjust it using the bottom adjuster as opposed to the top Because I think you just have too much slack in the adjustment. But I could be wrong because I'm not there to examine it in person. Doesn't hurt to have a clutch cable adjustment workshop in this case.

Fog- you were just lucky Honda beats Kawasaki every time. LOL just kidding
 

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Re: Clutch not fully disengaging the engine

Look at the picture See their front wheels are still on the ground? True though they always gave me fits at the bridge. but I ate them at Loudon.

FOG
 

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Re: Clutch not fully disengaging the engine

Isn't there an element of luck in those starts? Does it always come up roses every time? I would imagine that's why they are part of the race. I always liked the lemans starts where you have to run up to your vehicle and start it then go. Like in the movie "Grand Prix" with James Garner. I loved that movie. I sometimes practice those race starts on the streets. It draws a lot of attention that's for sure.
 

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Re: Clutch not fully disengaging the engine

Well luck is what you make for yourself.
I practiced starts very seriously as they often decide the finish. In amateur racing passes on the track can be difficult in a closely matched class. I always raced in a stock production class where the bikes were very even in power and performance. So if you got stated in front it was much easier to stay there than to get there later. You can see that clearly demonstrated in Super-cross. where they stuff the guy into the hay bales to get by. Try that at 100 MPH!
Most races don't think too much about starts . I always did. I was deemed a faster rider than I really was, because I was tough to pass.

FOG
 

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Re: Clutch not fully disengaging the engine

I noticed when starting the bike aftersitting for a week I had some of the same problem. The bike was in gear I held in the clutch to start it and it lurched forward. Not really thinking much about it as a problem but just because the clutch is tight. Some times I hold the clutch in to move it around the garage and have to rock it to move it.
Is this because it might be out of adjustment? I think it could be.
Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Re: Clutch not fully disengaging the engine

FOG said:
EX clutches are huge for the engine size. as a result they don't get "Used" enough, they get kind of fuzzy, Do a few race starts. IE; hold 10,000 RPM as you slip the clutch just enough to keep the front wheel 2 " off the ground untill 2nd gear. Repeat 3 time and you clutch will be fine.

OR put the front wheel against a stone wall hold 10,000 RPM the stall the engine with the clutch .repeat 3 times. Same result.

FOG
I cannot "slip the clutch" because even with the clutch fully pulled in I cannot push the shifter down into first without the bike lurching forward and stalling. Do you still recommend doing it against a wall? Also what chance do I stand of doing major damage to the bike using this technique? I am in no way a mechanic but it just sounds risky.
 

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Re: Clutch not fully disengaging the engine

The Idea is to force the clutch to slip. Use more revs. Or can you ride the bike? Try stopping it in first gear without stalling the engine.


FOG
 

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Re: Clutch not fully disengaging the engine

PapperTapper said:
FOG said:
EX clutches are huge for the engine size. as a result they don't get "Used" enough, they get kind of fuzzy, Do a few race starts. IE; hold 10,000 RPM as you slip the clutch just enough to keep the front wheel 2 " off the ground untill 2nd gear. Repeat 3 time and you clutch will be fine.

OR put the front wheel against a stone wall hold 10,000 RPM the stall the engine with the clutch .repeat 3 times. Same result.

FOG
I cannot "slip the clutch" because even with the clutch fully pulled in I cannot push the shifter down into first without the bike lurching forward and stalling. Do you still recommend doing it against a wall? Also what chance do I stand of doing major damage to the bike using this technique? I am in no way a mechanic but it just sounds risky.
Papper Tapper-

Yes, rest front wheel into a wall, clutch pulled in, 1st gear...the instant the bike begins to stall.....nail the throttle (beware of overev) and raise revs as necessary to prevent stalling. Perfectly safe to rev into middle of the tach range. This will take some unusual technique and quick reflex on your part. The wall performs as a safety measure, preventing bike from lurch and freeing your hand and thinking from the brake process. If you have the technique, stall the bike by using the clutch a few times. When you get good at this, you'll no longer need the wall.

WHY this semi-abusive method? Your clutch plates are glazed and sticking together (when they shouldn't be) This method should both free the plates and break up the glaze without any disassembly. You must be a bit abusive!

Alternately, you could disassemble and dress the plates...but no need using above. Your choice.

Shops will *charge* for disassembly and repair....yet use the above method on froze up clutches. Yup, been there, done that (bosses orders!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Re: Clutch not fully disengaging the engine

Thanks for all the help guys. I used the wall method and the bike shifts perfectly now. You guys are geniuses and saved me from a lot of hassle. I was very close to changing the clutch springs and for me that could take a while to figure out. Thanks again!
 

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Amazing! it only took 12 post and a slight argument . to find out what I told you at the start.

FOG
 
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Papper how dare you take so long, wasting Fogs time. He's quite busy (retired) you know. ;D
 

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Yes you have no idea how hard is is to keep up doing nothing.

FOG
 
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