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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I have a 2009 ex500r a couple months ago my bike got stolen, after I got it back I noticed the solenoid got ripped and the ignition was popped out, after getting a new ignition, solenoid and cleaning the carbs, I noticed it would crank but it would never start. I pulled the plugs and grounded them...I think, be forewarned I'm about as incompetent as you can be when it comes to electricity, looked at the tip while it was grounded to the engine, no spark, I checked the hot wire that plugs into the ignition coil and got I think .03v when I hit the start switch, and .4v when I let it off, I took off the handlebar switch cover to see if the switch itself that leads to the plugs was getting enough juice and it was pulling at 12.4v at the time, however I cranked it so much trying to find the problem the battery got drained, i have since charged the battery and installed new ignition coils thinking that was maybe the problem. Still no dice, after doing more reading I noticed some people mention the ignition needs a 8amp resistor, the ignition I bought has this thing attached to it I'm assuming this is the resistor? Is this why there is no spark? How do I install it? If no where should I touch my multimeter to next so I can get some actually useful information for you guys.
 

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Thinkin you got the wrong ignition switch. That resistor is supposed to be hidden inside the switch. I think you got an '87-'93 switch with no internal resistor.
 

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right ready for this. the ignition switch you have bought is a all years (both generations) switch. or in other words a multi switch for many bikes.
the little thing taped to the switch is a 100ohms resistor. gen 1s do not need this fitted but but gen 2's do.
you have a gen 2 so have to solder it between the brown and grey wire at the bottom of the switch or on the wires exiting the switch but before the white connector.
without it fitted your bike will never run. it is explained in more detail in this thread.

How to fit a aftermarket gen 1 switch to a gen 2 bike and why you may need to. | Ex-500.com - The home of the Kawasaki EX500 / Ninja 500R

ignore the reference to a yellow wire in the post as you have a universal switch. so it has no yellow wire it is the grey one you need to connect to. don't worry about orientation of the resistor they work either way round.

just pop the btm plate off the switch and solder or get someone to solder the resistor that came with the switch between the brown and the grey wire terminals cut off the loose bits. put the btm back on your good to go.
LIKE THIS.
Automotive tire Hood Vehicle brake Motor vehicle Alloy wheel
 

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Thinkin you got the wrong ignition switch. That resistor is supposed to be hidden inside the switch. I think you got an '87-'93 switch with no internal resistor.
he actually has the correct switch. you can clearly see in the first photo the wire colours the second one from the left is a grey one. gen 1 switches have a yellow wire. however aftermarket (universal) switches never seem to have the resistor fitted into the switch so it is supplied with one to fit yourself. as not all bikes the switch can be fitted to need the resistor.

if the OP solders in the resistor as instructed (between the grey and brown wire) or gets someone to do it for him it will work as a stock switch no problem. this is probably the reason he has no spark.
 

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he actually has the correct switch. you can clearly see in the first photo the wire colours the second one from the left is a grey one. gen 1 switches have a yellow wire. however aftermarket (universal) switches never seem to have the resistor fitted into the switch so it is supplied with one to fit yourself. as not all bikes the switch can be fitted to need the resistor.

if the OP solders in the resistor as instructed (between the grey and brown wire) or gets someone to do it for him it will work as a stock switch no problem. this is probably the reason he has no spark.
I'm nearsighted, as I have only gen1 bikes! I saw the resister taped to it and it didn't strike me that it was a universal switch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Going back to the ebay listing the dude literally included instructions on what to do with the resistor and I'm just an idiot, I didn't see any updates here before I went ahead and followed the instructions, I cut a bit off the grey wire and soldered the resistor to it, making sure no wires from either end were able to touch each other without going through the resistor, now it fires, there was no need to connect the brown and grey, if anything bad comes from not connecting the grey and brown with the resistor, like I get electrocute while riding and go into a guard rail, I'll let ya'll know. Unsure if this due to the switch or what, now it runs and I just have to address a too high float level as it dies whenever I give it throttle.
 

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I'm nearsighted, as I have only gen1 bikes! I saw the resister taped to it and it didn't strike me that it was a universal switch.
yeah same here. I just left click the mouse to enlarge the photo posted. but still need 3.0 glasses to read a wiring diagram. as for the switch well it's quite interesting if your into that sort of thing. I did a load of research and made dozens of enquiries before compiling the above "how to" .
the difference between a gen 1 switch and gen 2 is the output wire configuration. on the gen 1 the 2nd output wire needs to be powered to feed the temp sender. and ultimately the temp gauge. this wire was yellow by design so the gen 1 switch powers the system off it. there is no sensing wire (grey) in the system.

the gen 2 however powers the temp from the brown AUX wire. position 1, position 2 is therefore not a power position but instead is blank the grey wire is in this position as a loop feed for the CDI that requires a greater resistance than the feed aux wire. this was designated grey and goes direct to the CDI from the switch. so has a 100oms resistor soldered into the circuit. to provide the resistance. without this the CDI will not produce a spark for the coils.

to tell the difference between a gen 1 switch and a gen 2 switch is the wire colours if it has a yellow wire it's gen 1 if it has a grey wire it's gen 2. although it still may not have a resistor fitted so you have to pop the btm off to check.

Going back to the ebay listing the dude literally included instructions on what to do with the resistor and I'm just an idiot, I didn't see any updates here before I went ahead and followed the instructions, I cut a bit off the grey wire and soldered the resistor to it, making sure no wires from either end were able to touch each other without going through the resistor, now it fires, there was no need to connect the brown and grey, if anything bad comes from not connecting the grey and brown with the resistor, like I get electrocute while riding and go into a guard rail, I'll let ya'll know. Unsure if this due to the switch or what, now it runs and I just have to address a too high float level as it dies whenever I give it throttle.
seeing as how it is a generic switch cutting the grey wire and inserting the resistor may well make it work it depends where the switch wire output configuration is, could be the grey wire feeds off the brown aux wire internally so only needs the wire to be made a higher resistance. if that was the instructions with the switch it should be fine.
if you post the E-bay item number. (Not the whole listing) I will have a look and see if the instructions are correct.
but if it now works you have progressed further than others with the same problem have. :):)
 
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