Ex-500.com - The home of the Kawasaki EX500 / Ninja 500R banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,107 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Did my first automotive brake job last evening after gaining some confidence doing it a few times on the bike. Can't believe how easy it is, should have been doing this years ago and saved some money in the process.

The only issue was a stripped screw that held the rotor on. Had to by a screw removal kit to get it out.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
285 Posts
Did my first automotive brake job last evening after gaining some confidence doing it a few times on the bike. Can't believe how easy it is, should have been doing this years ago and saved some money in the process.

The only issue was a stripped screw that held the rotor on. Had to by a screw removal kit to get it out.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lU6OKQxSg8U
Did both of my front brakes on my Silverado this weekend. I also had the screw holding the rotor in place strip out on me....on both sides! Spent more time 'dremelling' those little bastards off than actually doing the rotor and pad change.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,992 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
3,640 Posts
One difficulty with doing automotive brakes is that sometimes the rotors can have rust build up inside the hat that prevents them from sliding off the hub. No amount of persuasion, heat, etc. was going to get the original ten year old rotors off the back of our VW. I ended up having to cut the disc and into the hat with a grinder, then slam a chisel into the cut to expand them enough to get them off.

The one mistake people make is not making sure the caliper slides freely on the bracket and the pins are clean, greased and the boots are good. If not, they won't function properly and you'll be replacing the inner pads again in no time and probably the rotors too, because the outer pads will look fine while the inners are wearing away until they scrape.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
363 Posts
Yeah, use some synthetic silicone grease on slider pins (Sil-Glyde works well).

On many import cars, there are blind threaded holes on rotor hats that don't go anywhere (Toyotas and Hondas have them). These are actually for pushing rotors off hubs. Typically they're M8x1.25 thread and you just screw in bolt into those holes and it pushes rotor away from hub. When replacing rotors, it's good idea to drill and tap hole like this into new rotor if it doesn't have one to make removing easier. Also some copper anti-seize between hub and rotor is good idea.




As for rotor seized to hub without threaded holes to push out, try some heat from torche. Can also use mounting holes for caliper with bolts and nuts to push out. Similar to this picture, but I'll just use longer versions of bolts that holds caliper on. Usually M14x1.5 or so. Screw it into caliper mounting ears and push rotor outwards.

 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
3,640 Posts
Yes the Passat actually has those threaded holes, but they were of no use in this case. The buildup of rust was so severe they had to be cut off.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top