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ok so the front tire is on the front, the back tire is on the back. (see how easy it is when you read the sidewalls)
it seems the back tire is as it should be rotation and fitment correct.
front, correct tire. but is fitted backwards. (wrong rotation) I would pop it back and ask them to change it.
 

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Yeah the rear is okay, just get the front sorted, it's all getting far too convoluted now with this thread and guys repeating earlier messages (insurance consequences if they find out about incorrectly fitted tyre). Also, seeing as it's the "rainy season" (it's always the rainy season in Scotland) you ought to have gone for a good, grippy, soft compound tyres. That way you have complete confidence in their wet weather abilities. Only saying this with 40+ years experience of riding in winter weather, and I need to feel confident in my machine to handle the wet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Damn i didnt read the reviews that shits crazy bro. I saw kawaski and instantly thought I was going to the pros. I cant even ride to get it fixed until friday its way too rany and windy to ride this week.
 

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Tanker Clown
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In The City there is (or used to be) a Motorcycle Co-op called Moto-Guild where you could go and learn how to work on your bike yourself. You don’t even need your own tools. They’re on Treasure Island:

I’d recommend checking them out. Never been there myself but used to work at a similar shop for the military. They have a tire machine according to their website. Your other option, if you have a space where you can work on your bike is to just pull the front wheel and take it to a shop.

As for shops in The City you can trust…Scuderia West had a great reputation. They’re now owned by the same owners of Speed Shop in Marin so I can’t state that reputation is still as good. Munroe Motors has a good reputation among Ducati owners.

Desmoto Sport has a long standing stellar reputation among Ducati owners as well. They’re usually booked solid for months on end…but a tire swap is pretty easy and not brand specific.

Only other place I know of that has had a good reputation for a long time is Nichol’s Sport Bikes in Redwood City. They also normally have a months long waiting list.

Like Desmoto, shops with that kind of reputation usually have a long wait because word gets around about who you can trust to work on your stuff. There may be a small independent shop or two around but they’re not well known outside of their local area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Ok i appreciate all this i need to look further where to go. Id much rather do it myself in eventually but im pressed for time with work . I noticed around 70 MPH theres a bit of a speed wobble, is this because of the tread not facing the correct way or did they not tighten my wheel in right ? Its a vubration at the handle bars very noticeable and only happens at high speeds .
 

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If the treads of two tires are the same and the have a "V" look, (slanted) the tread, in forward motion, is as < for the rear and > for the front. Naturally, this means direction arrows on the sidewalls will be reversed. Somewhat you can imagine that the (driven) rear grab the road better as it drives the bike ahead, while the front (the strongest brakes) grab the road better when brakes applied...but i suppose you could see it the other way if you were trying to displace a river of water...
 

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Tanker Clown
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In general a vibration is from an incorrectly balanced wheel. In general. The tread facing the wrong direction isn’t likely to cause a harmonic vibration (one that occurs at specific RPM) though it may cause some instability in handling. There are exceptions to these but in general both are true of the conditions associated with them.

Wheel alignment on the other hand may cause a vibration though in general this would occur continually rather than only at a specific road speed (wheel RPM). What is generally true of a wheel alignment issue is the bike falling into a turn with unexpected ease. Enough so it would surprise the rider. Again, there are exceptions to a generalization.

A wheel bearing problem could also induce a harmonic vibration. Given that it would appear some amateurs worked on your tire swap, it isn’t entirely out of the realm of probability that they also screwed up the reassembly too.=> you may have a damaged bearing<=“May” being the operative word.
 

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A wheel bearing problem could also induce a harmonic vibration. Given that it would appear some amateurs worked on your tire swap, it isn’t entirely out of the realm of probability that they also screwed up the reassembly too.=> you may have a damaged bearing<=“May” being the operative word.
That and the fact they put an 8 year old tire on backwards would lead me to thinking installation issues. My first thought was bad wheel balance on the front. Most modern tires really don't need a ton of weight to balance them (with some caveats); however, I have no idea about Road Winners. They may have matched the heavy spot of the tire with the heavy spot of the wheel.
 

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Tanker Clown
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That and left the old wheel weights on.

With off name brand tires….or even tubes for that matter, balancing them has required more weight than a quality name brand tire or tire/tube combination.

That was my experience with mounting and balancing tires for customers over the course of a year or so.

Guys who really rode would buy say, a set of Michelins and matching Michelin tubes. Easiest mount/balance ever.

Guys who cheaped out would come in, buy whatever was the cheapest sale tire and the cheapest tubes. Those took longer and were difficult to balance but after several rotations of the tire, a good compromise could be reached.

Then there were the fellas who’d come in with tires they found online for a song. No name brands from who knows where and buy the cheapest No name tubes to go with them. Those were a nightmare.

No amount of adjusting the tire on the rim could get a favorable result. I’d wind up with so many weights on the rim trying to balance that pile of crab combination…it literally took hours.

This isn’t a preference for my customer spending $$$ it’s how frustrating it was to try and make cheap a$$ $hit work to a customer’s satisfaction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
That and the fact they put an 8 year old tire on backwards would lead me to thinking installation issues. My first thought was bad wheel balance on the front. Most modern tires really don't need a ton of weight to balance them (with some caveats); however, I have no idea about Road Winners. They may have matched the heavy spot of the tire with the heavy spot of the wheel.
Its a new tires . Not 8 years old ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
That and left the old wheel weights on.

With off name brand tires….or even tubes for that matter, balancing them has required more weight than a quality name brand tire or tire/tube combination.

That was my experience with mounting and balancing tires for customers over the course of a year or so.

Guys who really rode would buy say, a set of Michelins and matching Michelin tubes. Easiest mount/balance ever.

Guys who cheaped out would come in, buy whatever was the cheapest sale tire and the cheapest tubes. Those took longer and were difficult to balance but after several rotations of the tire, a good compromise could be reached.

Then there were the fellas who’d come in with tires they found online for a song. No name brands from who knows where and buy the cheapest No name tubes to go with them. Those were a nightmare.

No amount of adjusting the tire on the rim could get a favorable result. I’d wind up with so many weights on the rim trying to balance that pile of crab combination…it literally took hours.

This isn’t a preference for my customer spending $$$ it’s how frustrating it was to try and make cheap a$$ $hit work to a customer’s satisfaction.
See thats what i didnt know, buying cheap tires for a car are always gonna be balanced that **** doesnt even matter on a car but this is motorcycle and had i known that i wouldve spent a few more hundred on them . I honestly didnt think a cheap tire would affect how a tire is balanced ???
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
That and left the old wheel weights on.

With off name brand tires….or even tubes for that matter, balancing them has required more weight than a quality name brand tire or tire/tube combination.

That was my experience with mounting and balancing tires for customers over the course of a year or so.

Guys who really rode would buy say, a set of Michelins and matching Michelin tubes. Easiest mount/balance ever.

Guys who cheaped out would come in, buy whatever was the cheapest sale tire and the cheapest tubes. Those took longer and were difficult to balance but after several rotations of the tire, a good compromise could be reached.

Then there were the fellas who’d come in with tires they found online for a song. No name brands from who knows where and buy the cheapest No name tubes to go with them. Those were a nightmare.

No amount of adjusting the tire on the rim could get a favorable result. I’d wind up with so many weights on the rim trying to balance that pile of crab combination…it literally took hours.

This isn’t a preference for my customer spending $$$ it’s how frustrating it was to try and make cheap a$$ $hit work to a customer’s satisfaction.
And apparently ninja tires are tubless or is that an option i can choose and what difference would the tube? Sorry if this comes across naive but idk **** about motorcycles or bicycles for that matter.
 
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