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Tanker Clown
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My example was for off road bikes which have tubed tires. Not something you need to worry about.

The problem with off name brand tires is you run the risk that the tire was not laser balanced when it was manufactured. All the premium brands do this and mark the tire with a white, yellow or red dot. Depending on who makes the tire, those mean different things. Heavy or light spot normally.

Off name brand tires….Crap shoot. If they were not laser balanced the heavy spot could be quite heavy. On Michelin tires I’ve seldom needed more than 4 weights to balance a tire. Most times I can get away with less than that, and have even had some balance with no weights.

Last off name brand tire I had to balance…..took 11 weights once I got it where it would actually balance. That took me ages and still had to use way more weights than I did on any other tire.

The comment about it being an 8 old tire is based on the date code in your picture. IE, it was manufactured in 2014 so 8 years ago.

Tires age out. The rubber itself goes off and gets age hardened or dry rots. So, when you buy your next set of tires, for this or a future bike, check the date code before you buy.

Mean time, see about getting your tire swapped around….maybe try somewhere else. I dunno that I’d trust a place that not only mounted my tire backwards but then came up with an excuse to get me to leave with it that way. Just my .02
 

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Its a new tires . Not 8 years old ?
My bad. I thought the "2014" in the picture of the front tire was the date code. I do see a "22" on the rear though which is good.

And apparently ninja tires are tubless or is that an option i can choose and what difference would the tube? Sorry if this comes across naive but idk **** about motorcycles or bicycles for that matter.
Nobody is born knowing any of this. Asking questions, researching, and doing is how we learn. The amount of absolutely dumb things I have done while learning motorcycles is astounding. They still happen--the frequency just goes down. And you learn tips/techniques like marking any lines you remove with green tape or some other visual indicator that it needs to be redone. Taking way more pictures than you would ever think necessary. And placing nuts/bolts/parts into labelled bags and component-separated containers. My garage looks like a tupperware factory.

Anyway, they are tubeless, yes. Most sport/street tires are now. Tubeless is what you want, and you can even get yourself a little plug kit for roadside repair in the case of an emergency. You'll generally see tubed tires on dirtbikes or other bikes with spoked wheels where the wheel isn't air tight (there are exceptions).

I think your entire situation gets resolved if that front tire just gets flipped and the wheel balanced. Sorry you're dealing with this so early in your motorcycle career--but ultimately you'll end up with everything sorted, and you'll be a lot more knowledgeable about your bike. So despite it being an annoyance now (and trust me, I know it is), the knowledge gained will pay off in the future.

*Edit - The first time I went to change tires myself took me two weeks. I thought I was going to rip the tire in half trying to get the tire bead over the wheel lip. I gave up, drove to Cycle Gear with my tail between my legs, and asked them to mount the tires. They said they didn't have a machine at that location. So I went home, kept cracking at it, and after a lot of sweat and swearing finally got the tire on. What used to take me weeks now takes me... probably two hours to swap tires. Mainly getting the wheels on and off and prepping stuff. I was being cheeky when I shot this video, but it actually shows quite a few little tricks that I had to learn mostly the hard way.
  • Heat the tire up with hair dryer (or leave in the sun--doesn't work in winter)
  • Bead drop center tools help a ton getting the tire on
  • RuGlyde as tire lube works better than dish soap and water for me
  • 2 tire levers is not enough for me--3 makes it easier
  • Mark the heavy spot of the wheel before mounting. It's not always at the valve stem like is often stated.
  • As Apriliarider mentioned, the markings of different tire manufacturers mean different things (light or heavy spot)
  • I wear my padded riding jeans when mounting tires after bruising the crap out of them
  • First time I ever "set the bead" I was so freaked out I wore my helmet and leather riding gear. Compressed air scares me, lol
  • I draw arrows with marker on both the tire and the wheel to ensure they're mounted in the right direction. Yea... I've mounted them backwards before as well and didn't notice until it was reinstalled on the bike. Haven't done that again since drawing the arrows though.
  • These are rattlecanned trackbike wheels in this video... so I didn't take too much care in preserving the paint
  • Clean the wheel bead with an abrasive (but soft-ish) dremel bit prior to tire installation and install new valve cores to avoid slow air leaks
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
My example was for off road bikes which have tubed tires. Not something you need to worry about.

The problem with off name brand tires is you run the risk that the tire was not laser balanced when it was manufactured. All the premium brands do this and mark the tire with a white, yellow or red dot. Depending on who makes the tire, those mean different things. Heavy or light spot normally.

Off name brand tires….Crap shoot. If they were not laser balanced the heavy spot could be quite heavy. On Michelin tires I’ve seldom needed more than 4 weights to balance a tire. Most times I can get away with less than that, and have even had some balance with no weights.

Last off name brand tire I had to balance…..took 11 weights once I got it where it would actually balance. That took me ages and still had to use way more weights than I did on any other tire.

The comment about it being an 8 old tire is based on the date code in your picture. IE, it was manufactured in 2014 so 8 years ago.

Tires age out. The rubber itself goes off and gets age hardened or dry rots. So, when you buy your next set of tires, for this or a future bike, check the date code before you buy.

Mean time, see about getting your tire swapped around….maybe try somewhere else. I dunno that I’d trust a place that not only mounted my tire backwards but then came up with an excuse to get me to leave with it that way. Just my .02
Yeah bro , i agree ! thank you for all this, its greatly appreciated!
 

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Anyway, they are tubeless, yes. Most sport/street tires are now. Tubeless is what you want, and you can even get yourself a little plug kit for roadside repair in the case of an emergency. You'll generally see tubed tires on dirtbikes or other bikes with spoked wheels where the wheel isn't air tight (there are exceptions).
yeah you learn all this stuff as you go along dam annoying but it's part of the learning curve and you will know for next time. this is why most of us who can DIY tire changes never send a bike to a shop.
on the inner tube front yes they are tubeless so these are the ones to use. However sometimes a tube will fix a major issue.
just for instance my gen 1 has a tube on the front wheel. the alloy was so corroded the tire would not seal no matter how clean I tried to get it so popped a tube in instant cure. but normally this not an issue.
 
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