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Had a bit of a fun time wrenching on my 1993 900SS all weekend.

It started out a few weeks ago when I noticed a strange black mark rubbed off on the corner of every link on the drive chain. That turned out to be the accordion dust boot behind the clutch slave cylinder, which had been slowly leaking for a while, causing the accordion boot to swell and push into the chain. That in turn led me into the clutch because why not inspect it. Well, good thing, the throwout bearing was toast and the friction disc tabs were very much worn. Time for a new clutch.
The clutch master had been damp around the piston boot for a while, so might as well rebuild that too on top of the slave.

I knew I was due up for timing belts and a valve check, so since I'm already digging into the bike with the fairings off, might as well do those too. Got the EMS (now sold by LT Snyder at Desmotimes) 2 valve shim kit. Not cheap at almost $300, but very much worth it. Picked up belts from CA Cycleworks. Got a bunch of small OEM stuff from Ducati Omaha.

Since I was already going deep into the bike, I might as well do a few other small things, such as replace a bunch of worn out wellnuts plus a deep clean of the engine case.

Took a couple of weeks to get everything together as stuff was getting shipped from various places, but I finally had it all by last week and dove in this weekend.

It was my first time doing a desmo valve adjustment, but it really wasn't that difficult. Math for figuring out new shim sizes is pretty straightforward and simple. Almost lost a closer keeper though, that had me sweating for a minute.

After the valve adjustment on Saturday, I tackled the timing belts on Sunday. Unfortunately, I have an early style engine and the cam gears have a bit of a lip to get over for the belt to drop into the grooves. Not fun, especially on the vertical cylinder. Eventually got it though after some head scratching. The vertical cylinder likes to settle back 2 teeth on the timing, so you either have to have 3 hands to hold the cam in place while wrestling the timing belt or pop the belt on and get creative with skipping two teeth afterwards to get the timing right. The horizontal cylinder is not under tension and will hold its timing mark.
Next time, I'm just going to rotate the crank to compensate for where the vertical cylinder likes to rest, save myself some headache.

So, I then install the new Barnett clutch (great product, highly recommend) and assemble the freshly rebuilt clutch hydraulic system. That goes as planned.

Fire it up before installing the fairings to make sure everything is kosher. It runs well for a couple of minutes, fantastic. Put tools away, turn around and see a damp spot right underneath the clutch slave. Great. Give it a whiff and it's actually gas. The float bowl overflow hoses exit right in the same area. I run the pump for 20 seconds and sure enough, fuel is spilling out. Trace it back to the right carb, likely a sticky or improperly seating float valve. Luckily, I bought a pair of carb rebuild kits when I got the bike.

So, I lift the airbox up enough to gain access to the right carb, get the float out, replace the valve, clean things up, reinstall the float and valve (bit annoying on the right carb as the valve and float pin are accessed from the left side), button it up and fire it up. Runs great, no leak. Put tools away. Turn around, another damp spot of fuel. Ahhh!!
Trace it back to the LEFT carb this time. Rinse and repeat. At least the left carb float and valve are much easier to access.

Fire it up and it lights off faster than I've ever had it do. It's always taken a bit of cranking to fire up, so I think I've actually always had sticky floats and just never notice as I never leave the fuel pump running long enough after a ride to dump fuel everywhere and I almost never start in in the garage, always roll it outside first, where the driveway has lots of spill stains. Anyways, finally not leaks, even after running the fuel pump for another 30 seconds and sitting for a half an hour afterwards. Throw the fairings back on, dust it off and take it for a quick spin.

That new Barnett clutch is fantastic. No more chattering off the line. It grabs fairly quick but has a nice linear action to it, I got accustomed to it after only a minute of riding. It's also MUCH quieter than the stock worn out clutch. Still has the distinctive dry clutch sound at idle, just without the clanging.

I'm due up for tires next month as well as my yearly oil change in June. After that, should be trouble free riding again until the next timing belt and valve service several years from now.


Note: I did have one issue with the right carb which will need to be addressed. The float had ingested a very small amount of gas. Not much, but any liquid in a float is no bueno. I will need to source a replacement. @ducatiman, you wouldn't happen to have a spare Mikuni BDST 38 float hanging around?
 

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very possible, I'll check and get back later on today as I'm diving into yet another set of 2 fitties for a guy in (curiously enough... Ca)

Aside from the unique, different valve adjust procedure, the old air cooled 2V surprisingly easy to maintain, simple, reliable too.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
very possible, I'll check and get back later on today as I'm diving into yet another set of 2 fitties for a guy in (curiously enough... Ca)
Thanks. No rush, bike is running fine as is, just want to have one on hand to swap in a bit later this spring.

Aside from the unique, different valve adjust procedure, the old air cooled 2V surprisingly easy to maintain, simple, reliable too.
The valve adjustment isn't even all that hard or time consuming. The only real special tool needed to service the valves is the shim measuring tool, which isn't even expensive. I've done a valve adjustment on a Kawasaki Concours 14, which has a more conventional shim under bucket, and I gotta say that was the biggest headache ever. So much crap to get out of the way and there's still almost no access to the top of the engine. Cams need to come out too if any shims need to be changed. An all day job with 2 people. I'll take a 2V Desmo valve adjustment any day over that Concours.
 

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Do have a float for you, I'll PM
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ask I shall receive! PM sent.
 
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