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Discussion Starter #1
I moved the bike out of its wraps in the corner and started in on the front shock removal yesterday and discovered that a mouse has "wintered" in the tail section. No damage thank goodness, just a pile of picked-through birdseed. I'll do things differently next year.

Anyways, once I got a 12mm hex-head socket end from the local Snap-On guy I was in business. Checked SEARs and Canadian Tire. Their sizing stops at 10mm.
Removal was a breeze and they are now in the hands of a local dealership for a rebuild and new springs.
Thanks to Fog and Dad and many others who contributed to the knowledge base.

Only thing I wish I had thought of is this: I should have marked the position of each tube relative to the upper pinch clamps. I'll figure it out though.

Here's a question. When I reassemble the wheel assy. should I grease the axle a bit and what with? My Clymer manual specifies something I've never seen around here.
 

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The grease is just about anything you have as it only rust prevention. On setting up the forks when you get them back, look up and read "The String thing" It will tell you how to be assured your bike is straight.

Why didn't you rebuild the forks youself. It's a POC. We could have talked you through it easy.

FOG
 

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just rebuilt mine yesterday, new bushings, seals, oil. actually did two sets of forks yesterday for the ex500. it is very easy as long as you keep track of where everything goes.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
FOG said:
The grease is just about anything you have as it only rust prevention. On setting up the forks when you get them back, look up and read "The String thing" It will tell you how to be assured your bike is straight.

Why didn't you rebuild the forks youself. It's a POC. We could have talked you through it easy.

FOG
Thanks Fog, i'll do the string thing. As to why I'm not doing the rebuild...I looked at the exploded parts diagram in my manual and thought naaahhh maybe not. I'd find a way to screw up. Besides, the dealership is a good neighbour. I'm doing my part to keep them around. ;)
 

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2dogs said:
Only thing I wish I had thought of is this: I should have marked the position of each tube relative to the upper pinch clamps. I'll figure it out though.
The fork tubes stock setting are 5/8" projecting above the top triple clamp.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
dad said:
2dogs said:
Only thing I wish I had thought of is this: I should have marked the position of each tube relative to the upper pinch clamps. I'll figure it out though.
The fork tubes stock setting are 5/8" projecting above the top triple clamp.
Excellent. Thanks dad.
 

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I don't like to disagree with Dad because he's usually right. But I submit that getting the wheel perpendicular or parallel to the rear wheel is far more important than the amount of fork extension. This is not a accurate way of accomplishing this task. Frankly I ran my forks flush to the top of the top tree to get the max ground clearance.

In my piece "The string thing" I describe how to measure and adjust the front wheel so that it parallel to the rear, by slipping a fork tube up or down to cock the wheel a bit. I have often had to set the tube uneven by as much as 1/8" to accomplish this.

Check.

FOG
 

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FOG said:
I don't like to disagree with Dad because he's usually right. But I submit that getting the wheel perpendicular or parallel to the rear wheel is far more important than the amount of fork extension. This is not a accurate way of accomplishing this task. Frankly I ran my forks flush to the top of the top tree to get the max ground clearance.


FOG
I was only replying to the narrow question of the stock fork projection above the top tree. 8)

I too raised my front end for corner clearance, running the tube all of the way down to the beveled edge at the top. This raised the front 1/2" and left the full diameter of the tube engaged in the clamp with about 1/8" projecting above, the amount of the bevel at the tube top.

I'm not sure I would raise the front like that without first raising the rear due to the increased rake and trail that will add. Very nice with the rear raised, though. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I had my first ride this past weekend and the rebuilt shocks have really improved handling. Diving under braking is significantly reduced and feedback is excellent.
For interested Canadians, I took the shocks into Two Wheel in Guelph. The springs were $129 for the pair and the rebuild was $150.00
 
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