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And I second John Z...put that thing in the sun for a while!

I've posted my NoMar experience and I think the Dismounting bar is a big key to getting the tire on and off. (You can buy those separately from the company).

Don't want to get into a tire argument here but don't count out the Shinko's! I put a Raven 009 on the Versys before I traded it. I wanted a more sporty tire as opposed to a 40/60 type. Had about 1500 miles on it and they were nice! And...$92 + tax at Cycle Gear!!! I'm hearing awesome reviews on the PR5's in handling but I've also heard that they're wearing just the same as some of the others.
A good mounting bar certainly makes the job a lot more pleasant. I bought a hybrid bar (No Mar demount tip and Mojo Lever mounting end) from a guy on a Suzuki forum a few years back. Works like a champ.

I also have the HF setup; car tire base and motorcycle tire upper. Worked OK as it comes out of the box, but was always paranoid about scratching rims. Mojo Blocks help hold the tire much better and remove the risk of scratching. The blocks and the mounting bar take the HF setup from blah to awesome.

I'd rather have the full No Mar rig if money were no object, but the modified HF setup certainly does a great job for a fraction of the cost.


 
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A good mounting bar certainly makes the job a lot more pleasant. I bought a hybrid bar (No Mar demount tip and Mojo Lever mounting end) from a guy on a Suzuki forum a few years back. Works like a champ...

...I'd rather have the full No Mar rig if money were no object, but the modified HF setup certainly does a great job for a fraction of the cost.



Hey, whatever works is all that matters!!! I love the NoMar and I know it's expensive but the way I saw it, it's a keeper for a long time. Plus, now that I'm into the "faster" bikes I'm probably going to be changing tires a lot more. I used to ride cruisers for years and those tires would generally last a pretty long time. Not so much on these lighter, faster, quicker bikes.
And now that I have this Honda CB...I have a feeling I'm going to be changing rear tires rather regularly! >:)
 

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Man those NoMars look nice. I actually just changed the rear this weekend. I just use three long spoons (14.5") and two 2x6s instead of bucket and some lube. Even taking my time to be super careful of the rim, I can probably get it on/off in 30 mins each. Then I just use the axle and some car jacks to balance using Harbor Freight 1/4 oz weights. Its not perfect, but it's better than nothing.

Everything mentioned here is, as always, great advise. Getting it warm first does wonders for sure.

For others that are looking to do this for the first time MC Garage has a great change and balance how to video:

I also just discovered this zip tie method...haven't tried it, but it is very interesting to say the least:
 
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Discussion Starter · #25 ·

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I've spooned on some Shinko SR740/741 tyres onto my street 250 after original BT45s wore out. They are actually very, very good. Took it to track to compare to my race 250 and was almost as fast. Certainly grippy enough to drag hard-parts on either side (kickstand & exhaust), and do stoppies at will. On my 4th set of Shinko radials on my CBR600RR. The 003 model is exactly same as previous Yokohama 003.

I use big C-clamp to break bead off old tyre. And use my feet and knees to mount like that video above. Takes maybe 30-minutes per tire beginning to end, including mounting on/off bike. Instead of sunlight, I just use tyre-warmers, really helps. Mounting Alpha 13-SP tyres on race bike, I could almost get 2nd-bead completely on by hand. Just final short 20cm section that needed one single pop of spoon-lever and that was it. I never need 3rd lever for anything.
 

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Don't knock the Shinko's! They may be cheaper but they're a quality tire. The way I see it, the Shinko's may not last as long but they're cheaper and you can get a few before spending the money on one higher-end tire.

Helps when you save money by changing them yourself! :wink2:
 

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Don't knock the Shinko's! They may be cheaper but they're a quality tire. The way I see it, the Shinko's may not last as long but they're cheaper and you can get a few before spending the money on one higher-end tire.

Helps when you save money by changing them yourself! :wink2:

No one is knocking them. Back in the day they had a rather poor reputation but they've come on in the last decade or so. Maybe sponsoring Supermoto racing had a bit to do with it but I dunno.



Way back when, Shinko, Cheng Shin and Maxxis were some real crap sports bike tires that you bought because you couldn't wait to afford a better tire to get back on the road. That was maybe 30 years ago.


Now, all three have come a very long way in their product development but Shinko is probably the better of the 3. Maxxis...I dunno about their street tires but their off road tires were seemingly quite good sellers when I worked at the cycle shop. I mounted plenty of them I'll say that.



All I know is, my best riding buddy uses the hell out of them and swears by them as far as grip goes. Longevity too, as he gets around 10K out of a rear. I think he uses the "Raven" model tire. Seriously, that's only around 2K less than he gets from a PR 3 or 4. I think he said he pays around same price for a full set, that he use to pay for a PR4 rear.



So.....uh, how'd it go bpe? All mounted up? ............ sean
 

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Eh? Shinko's only been around 21-years. They bought out all of Yokohama's bike tyre production: plants, moulds, designs, etc. Their very first products took over where Yokohama left off.

Maxxis is marketing brand-name of Cheng Shin. Kinda like McDonald's "Big Mac". One and same. Has widest range of tyres of any maker. Downright crappy moped/scooter stuff to top-rated race-worthy tyres. Also largest bicycle tyre manufacturer world-wide.
 

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No one is knocking them. Back in the day they had a rather poor reputation but they've come on in the last decade or so. Maybe sponsoring Supermoto racing had a bit to do with it but I dunno...

...All I know is, my best riding buddy uses the hell out of them and swears by them as far as grip goes. Longevity too, as he gets around 10K out of a rear. I think he uses the "Raven" model tire. Seriously, that's only around 2K less than he gets from a PR 3 or 4. I think he said he pays around same price for a full set, that he use to pay for a PR4 rear.

I put a Raven 009 on my Versys before I traded it. $92 and they were really nice! I'll probably go with the Shinko's again with my Honda CB when the stock ones are toast.

As for your friend getting 10K out of a rear tire...that's pretty damn good! I normally change out tires, especially rear, around 7-8K.
 

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I know I’m late on this, but I can confirm. Changing these tires was actually kind of cool and fun. Hard work, but you sure do appreciate the work you put into the bike way more.
I used one tire iron and the rest was thick flat head screwdrivers and beer.

Sick looking tires btw.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
^ What brand of tires did you use?
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Step 1 complete


Went to the car wash with a can of degreaser and a scrub brush.

My standard procedure before changing a rear tire/chain. Clean all the chain fling off the rim. I'm admittingly an over-luber :grin2:. And the only time I clean the rim is prier to a tire/chain replacement.

The tire gets pretty slick for the ride home :surprise:.
 

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The issue with applying new lube over old lube without cleaning the chain first, is that you can trap dirt and crap stuck to the old lube to make an abrasive grinding paste that does a number on 'o' / 'x' rings, rollers and sprockets. Giving the chain a quick rub down with [insert you fave chain cleaner here] before applying lube makes a huge difference in chain/sprocket life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Step 3 complete

Removed the tire.
Make no mistake about it, it was a deal.

I may have made some tool marks on the inside, but I promise you I did not do all of this :surprise:.
Make a note you can see a wear mark in the middle from previous installs. There is also a couple other ones just like it around the rim.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Step 4 complete

New tire installed
That step went a little easier than I thought it would :grin2:.
Certainly a lot easier than the front tire on my XT.


But I did try to line up the yellow dot with the valve stem, and missed my mark a little.

But what has really got me ticked.

Is this valve stem, that is only a year old is showing dry rot :surprise:.
Didn't notice it until it was too late. All I can do now is hit it with some armor all and hope for the best it will go another year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Steps 5,6,7,&8 complete


Wheel balanced
New sprockets installed
New chain installed
Wheel installed in place

Calling it a wrap for today. Only thing left is wheel alignment, chain slack adjustment, axle bolt torque, chain lube, reinstall sprocket cover and chain guard.

And maybe clean the ole EX up a bit :grin2:.
 

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Oh yeah, I've always found the valve stems to be cracking by the time a new tire goes on, so I always replace it regardless of condition.

Thankfully for you, the stems are relatively thick, so you should be good for another year, which I'm assuming is about how long it takes you to burn through a rear tire. Little bit longer for a front.
 

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Looks like someone used some sort of bead-sealant glue on previous install. Or is that just corrosion?

I prefer to always replace valve-stems when doing tyre-change. I like angled metal ones as they last forever and makes it easy to air up.
 
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