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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am novice.
I am dedicating myself to simply getting better through video review and practice.
Heres first run with new RaceTech springs front done, and EX300 rear shock swap.
Clip ons, airbox mod, exhaust, FOG rear seats, stock gearing.
No leather gear on, a big strike to my confidence.
Rear is too stiff. Bounced me a couple times, need to adjust.
New f tire.
Video below, I plan on doing this same run for a couple weeks seeing my improvement in video
I'll post again in a couple days w some new footy.




Feel free to give any advice.

Anyways. I dont see any "video compilation" type threads recently, so I thought I'd start my own even if I end up being the only one bumping myself. Love to see what you guys got , I often review video footage for self improvement. Love to see anyone elses runs or laps as well on the EX
 

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Cool video. Looks a lot better than the ones I have done.
In case you're not aware we do have a ride video section on the site.
Your Video 'ventures
If you wanted I could move this thread over there, or it can be left here if you prefer. You're call.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
are you sure you want this. just asking.
I can handle assuming it's not coupled with harsh flaming. I'm only looking for improvement, especially looking for things "I dont see".

Next video I believe I will try chin view for more accurate video footage of head/weight placement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Cool video. Looks a lot better than the ones I have done.
In case you're not aware we do have a ride video section on the site.
Your Video 'ventures
If you wanted I could move this thread over there, or it can be left here if you prefer. You're call.
I wasnt aware of that section, yeah, please totally move it to best fitting catagory.
Thanks for letting me know.
 

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I can handle assuming it's not coupled with harsh flaming. I'm only looking for improvement, especially looking for things "I dont see".

Next video I believe I will try chin view for more accurate video footage of head/weight placement.
it's ok nothing sort of major but from what I picked up from a 8min video. bear in mind this is only my opinion. first thing first ride out after doing major work on the bike that could and probably does affect how the bike handles should be a leisurely ride to get used to it to find out what it does or doesn't do, not a storming sprint into nowhere.
while riding straight your tracking, or wondering in the lane from the road line to the kerb. you should try to ride in a straight line in the middle of your lane, unless a vehicle in front blocks your view then you should move over to the side so you can see down his inside to see what he can see.
anticipate well ahead give your self plenty of reaction time to events in front. as they occur millisecond by millisecond,
you seemed a little slow to react on occasions.
be aware of your surroundings all the time not just the road but at the side of it both sides that is more than likely where issues will come from.
when cornering position yourself so you can see as far as possible ahead around the corner. so if it's a left hand corner move to the right. right hand corner move to the left. you missed several apexes. if you cannot see all way round the corner and you have to brake your going too fast, slow in fast out is the key.
lastly not really a point but it would have been nice to see a shot of the speedo it's hard to estimate the speed as the camera shutter speed can be faster or slower than real time.
edit.
BTW nice bit of windy road wish ours were like that little traffic. no speed cameras no major pot holes. ect .
 

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Mostly agree with what Yorkie said. Personally not a fan of double yellow passing though. There were some unnecessary swerves, maybe a little strong on the countersteering especially if trying out a brand new suspension setup.
 

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Nice down-shifts at the stop sign! and it's nice to hear the that good ol' engine unwinding without a lot of wind noise, too.

But yes, per Yorkie, including the speedo would be a nice touch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks gents.

first thing first ride out after doing major work on the bike that could and probably does affect how the bike handles should be a leisurely ride to get used to it to find out what it does or doesn't do, not a storming sprint into nowhere.
I agree, Its a bit spirited for a maiden voyage. I do know the road very well. "Back of my hand" isnt quite it, so you're right. I should be more cautious. I did do about 50 Miles or so on my way over to that location; Got some scrubbing done on some twisties before hand.

while riding straight your tracking, or wondering in the lane from the road line to the kerb. you should try to ride in a straight line in the middle of your lane, unless a vehicle in front blocks your view then you should move over to the side so you can see down his inside to see what he can see.
I want to blame this on my heavy shoulder bag and my low ass handlebars + my downward focus on the road way ahead of me.
I should try and stay center more for the sheer purpose of practice. I'll try that a bit harder. I don't ever aim to center myself in lane, never thought of it being needed; but I can see I should start making effort now that you point it out.

you missed several apexes.
Yes. Again , with my defences; but my throttle play a bit more than I am used to as well; just made the adjustment; but I had much more play before hitting actual throttle which caused me to make more dramatic effort to pull it.
My clip ons are below top triple; it really throw my weight on to my wrists if I am not careful. Probably a lot to do with the tracking and the bad apex is how I am holding myself.
lastly not really a point but it would have been nice to see a shot of the speedo it's hard to estimate the speed as the camera shutter speed can be faster or slower than real time.
edit.
No Speedo, No Tach, Only a red LED hooked up inside headlight housing in case oil light goes off.
Trying to figure out how to get my GoPro to produce the MPH on GPS mode , hopefully I can get it to work.

My only advice is don't let ur mama watch this video.
Yes.
Mostly agree with what Yorkie said. Personally not a fan of double yellow passing though. There were some unnecessary swerves, maybe a little strong on the countersteering especially if trying out a brand new suspension setup.
Yes, but I do my best to be very cautious. I make sure my view is clear and I GTFO when I pass so I am not holding anyone up either.


I do appreciate the input Gentlemen, I aim to be back by End of next week with improvements spoken on here.

Big thanks for the review @yorkie
 

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. you should try to ride in a straight line in the middle of your lane, unless a vehicle in front blocks your view then you should move over to the side so you can see down his inside to see what he can see.
I want to blame this on my heavy shoulder bag and my low ass handlebars + my downward focus on the road way ahead of me.
I should try and stay center more for the sheer purpose of practice. I'll try that a bit harder. I don't ever aim to center myself in lane, never thought of it being needed; but I can see I should start making effort now that you point it out.
I disagree. If you wanna end up on your a$$ sliding down the road, ride in the middle of the lane.

The middle of the lane is where cars leave all manner of slick crap behind. Oil, transmission fluid and antifreeze. ADin a little moisture on an early morning ride and SURPRISE….now you’re down and sliding along the asphalt rasp.

Stay as close to the center line so you can see as far ahead of your intended path of travel as possible.

Also, particularly in California, the roads tend to fall away towards the outer edges due to rain induced erosion of the road bed.

The center line and about 3 ft on either side of it is normally the best position in the lane.

SoCal roads may differ a bit from NorCal in condition and where the best asphalt within a lane is.
 
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your welcome. I could not comment on @PEX500 comment as I'm not familiar with your road markings but it seems like sound advice. as for @Apriliarider comment fair enough different roads perhaps but in 60 years on bike (not all at once of course :oops::oops:) I've not been on my ass once due to this problem, however the edge of the pavement is where all the nails screws sharp bits and rocks tend to be. the middle of the road (not lane) is closer to on coming traffic and tends to have a ridge on the edge of the line where wider traffic wheels run. up to you it's only opinion after all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I disagree. If you wanna end up on your a$$ sliding down the road, ride in the middle of the lane.

The middle of the lane is where cars leave all manner of slick crap behind. Oil, transmission fluid and antifreeze. ADin a little moisture on an early morning ride and SURPRISE….now you’re down and sliding along the asphalt rasp.

Stay as close to the center line so you can see as far ahead of your intended path of travel as possible.
This was always my original thought, But I can see see where @yorkie is coming from, I think there is a nice medium between the two, but to be fair , when riding on the highways and streets , I am always hovering on the lines; its the cleanest and easiest to avoid idiots this way, imo.
I think the Camera Orientation can be misleading as you cannot see head position.

Take it to the track. You'll improve I guarantee. Some Trackday Organizations like TrackXperience have free coaching for beginner level riders.
Better than making mistakes on ACH, Mullholland or Latigo.
Yes, Thanks for the link,I am actually actively looking into Groups to join to start an active Track progression. I appreciate this a lot, looks to be a good Org too. This video is Mulholland Hwy ,Uphill from the snake (which is still closed btw) ; Made the left onto Encinal.

your welcome. I could not comment on @PEX500 comment as I'm not familiar with your road markings but it seems like sound advice. as for @Apriliarider comment fair enough different roads perhaps but in 60 years on bike (not all at once of course :oops::oops:) I've not been on my ass once due to this problem, however the edge of the pavement is where all the nails screws sharp bits and rocks tend to be. the middle of the road (not lane) is closer to on coming traffic and tends to have a ridge on the edge of the line where wider traffic wheels run. up to you it's only opinion after all.
I do appreciate the input. There is a fair compromise between the two. Both dirty, and $hiet roads here,.
 

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Any MSF course material recommends lane position as riding in the left wheel track. Mostly for the reasons I mentioned. That puts you closer to the center divide line
As the Motorcycle Safety Foundation's (MSF) rider manual explains, you can imagine any lane divided into three equal parts: left, center and right. The safest “default” lane position for a motorcycle is in the leftmost third of the lane.
I added the bit about the way the asphalt here deteriorates due to the road bed erosion. Contribution from my 25 years of experience riding in California s back roads.

I use that situationally, as if I encounter a driver continually swerving over the lane divider on a multi lane road, I will take the wheel track farthest away to make sure I have cushion space in case it happens when I am along side.

Then I make sure to spend as little time as pissible n the danger zone when I do go by.

Also, I’ve found most traffic signal sensors in California trigger from the right wheel track.

Crossing the sensor at 5 mph or more in the right wheel track results in about 80% success rate in triggering the signal.

On the road, out on my own on my favorite curvy road…..I use the entire lane but mainly stay in the left wheel track, crossing to the right wheel track to set up for a left hand corner when needed.

Also, on the Highway I’ll use the right wheel track mainly if I’m using the far left lane so if traffic comes to a stop, I have an out, lane splitting between the cars. Any other lane, left wheel track it is.

I don’t know if that’s a compromise….just advanced situational awareness to me.
 
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