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Haha. This right here goes along with the "Best tires" and "Best oil" threads. Everyone you ask does something different and swears it is right. ;D
 

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I just use some Kerosene and a toothbrush, I heard that Kerosene works best because it's cheap and it doesn't damage the O-rings in the chain, plus it adds a little bit of lubricant. Then to top it off I sparay some Chain wax.
 

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bhd1223 said:
Haha. This right here goes along with the "Best tires" and "Best oil" threads. Everyone you ask does something different and swears it is right. ;D
truth is spoken... and on that note:

#2 pump diesel (and lots of it) a brush, some Honda Pro Contact and Brake cleaner to blast out the front sprocket area and to rinse the chain out well and promote drying, and a towel.
 

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If yo uhave an oring chain (highly recommended), using kersosene may or may not damage the orings (depending on which cheap little chinese factory made the orings and you willnever know) so I do not use it. Besides, the argument that kerosene or anything can help lube the chain is flawed. An oring chain by design is to hold its lubrication in, on the inner pins and against the inside of the rollers. IF any liquid can get in there, it will quickly be forced out by centrifugal force along with the lube redering the chain and its little orings useless.

Before- we clean the chain, lets talk about lube. Most just spray lube all over the chain and ride. The reasoning is that the rollers should have lube between them and the sprocket teeth. The force with which these two meet is so great that any lube in between them is forced out and onto your wheel, spricket, pants leg etc. The remaining collects road salt and dirt creating a great valve lapping paste and accelerating wear- completely counter intuitive to what you are trying to do. Why do they tell you to use it then? Many kids are in college because we do what the dealer says, and they aren't your kids! Lube- light apply a decent lube to the roller area only then use a rag to wipe off any excess 9which means nearly dry the chain. Your goal here is to keep the orings pliable and not letting those dry out and if in a moist area to keep surface rust from forming in between rides- you are forming a air and vapor barrier essentially. WIpe the side plates dry too. If you wipe with a dry rag, you will still leave enough for the barrier.

Cleaning- if you lube in the way mentioned, cleaning is so easy. I use simple green, puple power or some other biodegradable and spray it onto the chain and let it sit for a few minutes. Use a Grunge Brush (made specifically for chains and adjustable to clean bicycle chains for you pedalers like me) and scrub away. The chain remains installed, and you may have to reapply a few times on the first cleaning. Weekly cleaning takes only a couple of minutes if you stay on top of it. When done cleaning, wipe the ecess off with more cleaner and a rag. Lube as described above.

This method has been passed to me and used by guys that put 80k on a bike in a year. Also- help yourself and buy a good chain- spend once not three times!
 

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Or you could just take the chain off the bike, throw it in the dish washer, add some degreasing dish washer fluid and set on "pots and pans" (or highest possible setting) and then wait through the rinse and dry cycle.

If you don't have a dish washer, use a clothes washing machine instead, just make sure you put it on the setting that will get it the cleanest. Also make sure if you use a washing machine and use a detergent without bleach (cheer with color guard is a good brand) otherwise your chain will come out blotchy. I think it might also mess up the O rings but all in all you should be all right.

Even though your dish washer (or washing machine) may have a rinse cycle the chain will not be dry enough so i would use your dryer. make sure that you put the dryer on permanent press though, this is very important. you definatley don't want any water left on the chain after or you will have to go through the whole washing process over. If you don't have a dryer that can dry the chain, just hang it up outside in a sunny place for a few hours. In an extreme case where there is no sun try to use a hair dryer.

When it is done just throw the chain back on the bike and call it a day. I personally recommend doing this every other week or 500 miles whichever comes first. If you have to wait longer between cleanings be careful because you might have to hit the chain up with a wire wheel, specially if it shows signs of aging, wrinkles under the eyes, crows feet etc...

hold on my washing machine just beeped ;D
 

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***DISCLAIMER***

if you read what i wrote above and actually do that, uuummmm, well don't you'd be screwed if you do. But in the off chance that someone actually does it please take pictures!
 

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cstem said:
If yo uhave an oring chain (highly recommended), using kersosene may or may not damage the orings (depending on which cheap little chinese factory made the orings and you willnever know) so I do not use it. Besides, the argument that kerosene or anything can help lube the chain is flawed. An oring chain by design is to hold its lubrication in, on the inner pins and against the inside of the rollers. IF any liquid can get in there, it will quickly be forced out by centrifugal force along with the lube redering the chain and its little orings useless.
Actually, the service manual mentions kerosene or diesel oil by name as a method to clean the chain.

And for you other guys who clean the chain weekly (or something close to it), do you actually clean it according to the manual? Meaning, do you take the chain off? Seems like a real PITA.
 

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derf said:
Or you could just take the chain off the bike, throw it in the dish washer, add some degreasing dish washer fluid and set on "pots and pans" (or highest possible setting) and then wait through the rinse and dry cycle.

If you don't have a dish washer, use a clothes washing machine instead, just make sure you put it on the setting that will get it the cleanest. Also make sure if you use a washing machine and use a detergent without bleach (cheer with color guard is a good brand) otherwise your chain will come out blotchy. I think it might also mess up the O rings but all in all you should be all right.

Even though your dish washer (or washing machine) may have a rinse cycle the chain will not be dry enough so i would use your dryer. make sure that you put the dryer on permanent press though, this is very important. you definatley don't want any water left on the chain after or you will have to go through the whole washing process over. If you don't have a dryer that can dry the chain, just hang it up outside in a sunny place for a few hours. In an extreme case where there is no sun try to use a hair dryer.

When it is done just throw the chain back on the bike and call it a day. I personally recommend doing this every other week or 500 miles whichever comes first. If you have to wait longer between cleanings be careful because you might have to hit the chain up with a wire wheel, specially if it shows signs of aging, wrinkles under the eyes, crows feet etc...

hold on my washing machine just beeped ;D
LOL. Had my eyebrow raised a second there.... heheheh :D

I generally just try to wipe down and clean the chain with a rag sprayed with chain wax the best I can, then lube with chain wax about every week or 2. Probably could do better, but so far this keeps the chain pretty clean for me, so it works :)
 
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