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Hey, I bought a very used 2008 a year ago and have had many issues with the bike, the turn signals have not worked the entire time i have owned it, but recently I moved to a state that requires them so I need to try and fix them. The front signals are gone looks like they broke off when dropped by the last owner>? It still has the rear indicator lights but they will not turn on when i activate the switch, the indicator lights on the cluster also do not turn on when using the switch. Is it the signal relay? Does the circuit need the front lights to run? Could it be something else?lol. Would appreciate any help.

-thanks
 

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I would start checking all of the bulbs and connections that they are all good bulbs by either just replacing the bulbs and inspecting the sockets as you go and take it from there..
 
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84' Goldwing Aspencade, 91' EX500, 98' Ninja 250/17' 300 engine, 07' EX500
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I think his problem is as stated above, the OEM turn signal relay is a load based one, it needs all 4 regular bulbs to work correctly. Just when you convert to LEDs, you need to change the OEM relay to an electronic relay due to the lack of load/resistance of said LEDs.

He best bet is the fix the both front signals, and all bulbs are incandescent when using the OEM relay.

This might be a good time to switch the relay to an electronic relay, and if in the future you decide to install LEDs, you'll already have the proper relay. No need to spend, and time twice.

Hope this help, good luck.
 
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I think his problem is as stated above, the OEM turn signal relay is a load based one, it needs all 4 regular bulbs to work correctly. Just when you convert to LEDs, you need to change the OEM relay to an electronic relay due to the lack of load/resistance of said LEDs.

He best bet is the fix the both front signals, and all bulbs are incandescent when using the OEM relay.

This might be a good time to switch the relay to an electronic relay, and if in the future you decide to install LEDs, you'll already have the proper relay. No need to spend, and time twice.

Hope this help, good luck.
To work "properly" yes. Missing the front bulbs will result in a fast blink on both sides to alert the rider something is wrong. Getting nothing... More likely a fuse... 2 dead remaining bulbs... Or the relay.
 

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84' Goldwing Aspencade, 91' EX500, 98' Ninja 250/17' 300 engine, 07' EX500
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To work "properly" yes. Missing the front bulbs will result in a fast blink on both sides to alert the rider something is wrong. Getting nothing... More likely a fuse... 2 dead remaining bulbs... Or the relay.
With the less builds there's a lot less load, making the OEM relay useless, it needs a certain amount of load to function. Not only that, they are needed to complete the circuit. It also serves as a warning that there is a bulb burned out. If you have a bike with regular bulbs, try taking one out, it should react the same.


If the fuse is blown, the dash indicator will then just be solid, not blinking. But it's always a good idea to check the fuse too.
 
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With the less builds there's a lot less load, making the OEM relay useless, it needs a certain amount of load to function. Not only that, they are needed to complete the circuit. It also serves as a warning that there is a bulb burned out. If you have a bike with regular bulbs, try taking one out, it should react the same.


If the fuse is blown, the dash indicator will then just be solid, not blinking. But it's always a good idea to check the fuse too.
This is not my experience or understanding. Maybe gen 2 is different. I wired up my tail signals before I had front signals. Indeed I had not found the connector so there was no circuit. Also I believe the load is the same on the relay... But the draw is less in the controler which triggers the fast click to the relay. I am not saying you are wrong I am just explaining my experience and understanding. I am actually working on a balancer that draws the expected amperage per side so you can use LEDs if you want but still indicate failure... however rare LED failure is.

My money is on that relay.
 

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in a way your both right. doesn't matter which generation or even which bike or car a mechanical turn solenoid is fitted (it's more of a solenoid than a relay due to how it works) .
resistance is felt in the output wire due to the bulbs. resistance causes heat in a bi metal strip which bends when warm breaking the contact with the input wire. as the resistance is reduced it allows the strip to cool down to the point it contacts the input wire again. it's what causes the classic click. click. click.
the more heat generated the more the strip bends the slower it clicks. so if a bulb goes out there is less resistance so it clicks faster. if there isn't enough resistance it doesn't click at all just stays on, that's why LEDs don't work.
however you can fool the unit by adding resistors to the output wire then it will work with LED's the greater the value of the resistor the slower it will flash allowing you to adjust the flash rate, (I found 35ohms gives a flash rate of 1 per sec or 60 per min) on the gen 1 that has LED flush mount turn signals.
an electronic one has no mechanical parts so can be used on any system as the flash rate is not affected by the resistance in the system.
 

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in a way your both right. doesn't matter which generation or even which bike or car a mechanical turn solenoid is fitted (it's more of a solenoid than a relay due to how it works) .
resistance is felt in the output wire due to the bulbs. resistance causes heat in a bi metal strip which bends when warm breaking the contact with the input wire. as the resistance is reduced it allows the strip to cool down to the point it contacts the input wire again. it's what causes the classic click. click. click.
the more heat generated the more the strip bends the slower it clicks. so if a bulb goes out there is less resistance so it clicks faster. if there isn't enough resistance it doesn't click at all just stays on, that's why LEDs don't work.
however you can fool the unit by adding resistors to the output wire then it will work with LED's the greater the value of the resistor the slower it will flash allowing you to adjust the flash rate, (I found 35ohms gives a flash rate of 1 per sec or 60 per min) on the gen 1 that has LED flush mount turn signals.
an electronic one has no mechanical parts so can be used on any system as the flash rate is not affected by the resistance in the system.
A quick and cheap fix, permanent and adjustable
 
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