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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As of this moment, I have no tach/dash what so ever.
My paranoia sets in when I've been sitting at stop lights in the city and I can feel the asphalt shooting heat through the rubber beneath the soles of my shoes.

I've seen this. 7/8ths diameter though. I am really into this and am having a difficult time finding a suitable alternative other than vapor trail than can be discreet looking enough.


Out of 1 out of 10 in the stupid scale ; 1 being not very stupid , 10 being Village idiot ,
How bad of an idea is it to splice the line and stretch silicon hoses 2.2 mm to fit?

Any thoughts or advice are welcome.
 

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84' Goldwing Aspencade, 91' EX500, 98' Ninja 250/17' 300 engine, 07' EX500
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Interesting idea, but why not go with a small digital water temperature gauge?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Interesting idea, but why not go with a small digital water temperature gauge?
"Looks cool, man."

I like the idea of the gauge in the line. Feel like it's unique and functional.
If I were to use a digital thermostat, i most likely would need to mount it where gauges go, and I really prefer not having it there as it 1. Distracting, I have a terrible habit of breaking focus to look at gauges for no reason other than them being there.
2. I like the look of no gauges on the front until I can create a cup for the old gauge to mount. Gotta be analog, I'm particular about it.
3. Looking at trail tech thing , shows splicing the line anyways and using thier electronics. That'sthe closest alternative I've seen that is logical.

Currently having the big cluster off has me thinking If I do put anything up there its gotta be 1. Analog , and 2. Nice to look at.

I bought a spare cluster and tore it apart, contemplating how to create ways to mount wiring and create cups , cut the gauge faces smaller diameter. About 2 inches now. Just enough where the pin of the needles still hang on, but that's a totally separate shtpost in the future
 

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I seem to remember a rad cap with built in gauge.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I can find "tusk" mainly. Havent looked at the sizing. It looks like all of those on the cap have a short life span as there is no fluid to prevent the needle bouncing itself to death. Unlike the inline I showed that may have either water or a clear oil. Again also sizing isn't as easily available for them as they are resold by just about every company, looks like filler neck area may be too wide and deep as well. Lots of reports of it being easier to lift from pressure as well compared to OEM. though that was all based on KTM reviews.
 

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84' Goldwing Aspencade, 91' EX500, 98' Ninja 250/17' 300 engine, 07' EX500
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That's awesome.
That's a suitable alternative I would use for sure.
See a handful on the goog , will scope those too thanks.
I tried one of those, got a cheap one off eBay, and it sucked, it didn't hold pressure, and lost a lot of coolant. Hopefully the more expensive one work better.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I tried one of those, got a cheap one off eBay, and it sucked, it didn't hold pressure, and lost a lot of coolant. Hopefully the more expensive one work better.
Most hopefully looking one was from Dennis Kirk website "firepower" $40; 2 reviews. Both say lasted less than 1000 miles before gauge broke. Other brands have a tendency to blow by cap before 16 psi is it.

Reading through and it seeks I probably should replace my cap anyways as it's still OEM.

Was looking around for ideas about wiring the temp switch to an LED to hit on when temp got high enough, but it would require a decent amount of extra wires and still lacking a good looking and logical mounting location. But in still looking into this idea as well. Thanks @bitzz
 

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hi you could use the temp sender to work a light. yes you would require one extra wire. and some resistors.
the sender is an earth based unit. so you would need a power source for the light the earth return would go to the sender.
the next bit would be tricky and require some experimentation.
the sender increases the the amount of current going to earth. so would earth out the light and put it on. but the temp it put the light on at would be variable. a LED would require a certain current to light it. the temp this would be at is unknown so would require a resistor in the earth line to delay the point the light would come on.
the temp it lights at and the strength of the resistor in order to delay it. is where the experimentation would be.

a normal bulb would light very dimly at first and then get brighter as the temp increases but could be delayed by resistors to the point it lights brightly for a given temperature.
if you got adventurous you even have a dual colour bulb so it shines green for normal running temp then turns red when the engine is hot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
hi you could use the temp sender to work a light. yes you would require one extra wire. and some resistors.
the sender is an earth based unit. so you would need a power source for the light the earth return would go to the sender.
the next bit would be tricky and require some experimentation.
the sender increases the the amount of current going to earth. so would earth out the light and put it on. but the temp it put the light on at would be variable. a LED would require a certain current to light it. the temp this would be at is unknown so would require a resistor in the earth line to delay the point the light would come on.
the temp it lights at and the strength of the resistor in order to delay it. is where the experimentation would be.

a normal bulb would light very dimly at first and then get brighter as the temp increases but could be delayed by resistors to the point it lights brightly for a given temperature.
if you got adventurous you even have a dual colour bulb so it shines green for normal running temp then turns red when the engine is hot.
I found a diagram in some electrical forum for exactly this, but the light would have to manually turned off after it hits the needed amount of heat/volts to turn on.

It's still on my mind , and may choose to pursue, but only after I get the rest of my gauge set up going. I may even keep both the inline gauge and a light for safety.

Anyways. Did some hard googling.
Found a site "mac daddy racing" , ATV and dirt bike parts , sells them 3/4ths diameter, oil filled.
Snagged one at a somewhat heavy price of $59, but paid through PayPal to ensure I get a refund if it craps itself.
Will post pics whenever it shows up.
 

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I found a diagram in some electrical forum for exactly this, but the light would have to manually turned off after it hits the needed amount of heat/volts to turn on.
that is not the case at all. because once the temp range has been set for the light to come on at a predetermined level, as the temp lowers. the sender unit would have more resistance and therefore turn off the light.
at any point below the predetermined set level the light stays off when it reaches that temp the light comes on when the temp lowers it goes off again automatically.
guess how I know. well because I have one as a back up on the gen 1. it is set to come on at the time the fan kicks in about 3/4 on the gauge. when the required temp is reached the light comes on. then if the fan kicks in the light goes out but if the fan fails the light stays on and I know the fans not working and the temps too high.

here it is circled in yellow.
54533


the one on the left is for the alarm system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
that is not the case at all. because once the temp range has been set for the light to come on at a predetermined level, as the temp lowers. the sender unit would have more resistance and therefore turn off the light.
at any point below the predetermined set level the light stays off when it reaches that temp the light comes on when the temp lowers it goes off again automatically.
guess how I know. well because I have one as a back up on the gen 1. it is set to come on at the time the fan kicks in about 3/4 on the gauge. when the required temp is reached the light comes on. then if the fan kicks in the light goes out but if the fan fails the light stays on and I know the fans not working and the temps too high.

here it is circled in yellow.
View attachment 54533

the one on the left is for the alarm system.
Nice! Your set up sounds much better. And that light placement is friggin awesome. Got me really thinking here for my dash set up. This helps a lot. Thank you.

I have little electrical skills but I'm going to head off into some electrical forums and see if I can make sense of this. Sounds really cool to have set up the way you do with the 3/4ths then kick off/on the light. Thanks for the photos. Big inspo.
 

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your welcome. setting it up was a bit of a fiddle. greatly helped by the use of my sons thermal imaging equipment :) to get a temp reading when the fan came on.
this is the basis for the remarks on the other thread on cooling
using that temp reading it was a case of a 12v battery. camping stove. pan of water. to put the sensor in. bulb. wiring. resistors of various Ohms rating. and lots of practice. finding the exact temp to turn it on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
How's that inline gauge from MacDaddy Racing working out?
It works well. I do regret the idea slightly , and here's why...
1. It gets hot, much hotter than the silicone hoses. More on this below.
2. I poorly cut the silicone hoses to fit it, I need to recut and make some changes. To make it look "niceish". It looks jammed in there and not natural, silicon hoses dont have much bend to work with.
3. Vibration. Yes. The needle doesnt fluctuate all good there, but I need to physically hold/brace the gauge to view the temp accurately or the slight vibration of the motor still jiggles the now-weighted silicon hose which is more prone to vibration. And it's hot. So if you not wearing gloves. You're only getting a quick glance before your fingers begin to feel it.

It overall serves its purpose at stoplights and standing still when giving the opportunity to release the brake and slightly touch the gauge to prevent from vibrating.

When the bike is parked, it looks cool, will look cooler after some fixing, but need to order a new set of hoses to get what I want.
Will post pics soon. Have some other things I'm trying to fix up as well
 

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It works well. I do regret the idea slightly , and here's why...
1. It gets hot, much hotter than the silicone hoses. More on this below.
2. I poorly cut the silicone hoses to fit it, I need to recut and make some changes. To make it look "niceish". It looks jammed in there and not natural, silicon hoses dont have much bend to work with.
3. Vibration. Yes. The needle doesnt fluctuate all good there, but I need to physically hold/brace the gauge to view the temp accurately or the slight vibration of the motor still jiggles the now-weighted silicon hose which is more prone to vibration. And it's hot. So if you not wearing gloves. You're only getting a quick glance before your fingers begin to feel it.

It overall serves its purpose at stoplights and standing still when giving the opportunity to release the brake and slightly touch the gauge to prevent from vibrating.

When the bike is parked, it looks cool, will look cooler after some fixing, but need to order a new set of hoses to get what I want.
Will post pics soon. Have some other things I'm trying to fix up as well
Awesome, I'll sit back for now and see what you come up with. My rides aren't long so I'm not to worried about it in the short run.
 
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