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2003 500R
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So in my last post I had written about how I refurbished my bike, all the parts I've replaced, and how I was still getting weird handling characteristics.

Over the weekend I:
Replaced my steering head bearings
Replaced my front wheel bearings
Rebuilt my forks
Did the best alignment I could do (no strings though).

When I was replacing parts I didn't find anything that stuck out as particularly bad. The fork oil did need to be done though. Anyway.

When I took it out for a ride tonight I can honestly say there was an improvement, but there was still something off. Checked air pressure, triple checked the axle was tight, looked for any deformation in the tire.I didn't find anything.

Ready to call it quits and possibly even have a shop work on it. Putting the cover on I had a thought, am I an idiot?

Yes. Yes I am. I mounted the tire backwards.

So I'm going to flip it around get it rebalanced and go from there. Unless getting a new tire would be a better idea. I'm starting to doubt my own judgement 馃槄
 

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Used tire or new? Used would make a bigger difference, as it already has a directional wear pattern on it - maybe some cupping of the tread, etc.

Don't beat yourself up too bad. SAE certified mechanics do the same thing for $145/hour.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Used tire or new? Used would make a bigger difference, as it already has a directional wear pattern on it - maybe some cupping of the tread, etc.

Don't beat yourself up too bad. SAE certified mechanics do the same thing for $145/hour.
New tire. Michelin Pilot Street 2's
The issue I have is that I am a certified auto mechanic. I know that I know better 馃檭

I could blame my experience with car tires in that the tread pattern typically goes in that direction, but that's not a good excuse.
 

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D'oh! As we find out, tread patterns are opposite on bikes, as car tires don't lean. They have both sides to expel the rain. If you look at how the tread runs, you will see that it squeezes water to the outside in a turn. Cars have both sides to squeeze the water out of.
 

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84' Goldwing Aspencade, 91' EX500, 98' Ninja 250/17' 300 engine, 07' EX500
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I've almost done this myself.

Also when I got my Goldwing, I noticed the front end just never felt right. Then I looked at the front tire closely, turns out someone used a rear tire for the front.
 

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07 Ducati SS800 '95 Ducati 900SS/SP '19 Honda CBR650R
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I've almost done this myself.

Also when I got my Goldwing, I noticed the front end just never felt right. Then I looked at the front tire closely, turns out someone used a rear tire for the front.
thats quite rad, right there
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
D'oh! As we find out, tread patterns are opposite on bikes, as car tires don't lean. They have both sides to expel the rain. If you look at how the tread runs, you will see that it squeezes water to the outside in a turn. Cars have both sides to squeeze the water out of.
I appreciate the insight. That makes a lot of sense. Wouldn't water still get "trapped" in the tread when it's not leaning though?
 

Moderating: Fair & Just
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pop quiz time for the class: why do the front and rear tire have opposite directional treads?
Better stopping power on the front, better acceleration on the rear.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Better stopping power on the front, better acceleration on the rear.
Doesn't that validate my question about the water getting trapped in the tread though?

With the water not being repelled with a lean, and the front being the primary braking force. Being upright when it's raining (which I always am, I haven't honed my wet-riding skills) wouldn't it cause a hydroplane when the water doesn't have any more tread to escape through?

I'm not trying to say I'm right or anything. I'm no engineer, I know there's a reason they do what they do
 

Moderating: Fair & Just
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Doesn't that validate my question about the water getting trapped in the tread though?

With the water not being repelled with a lean, and the front being the primary braking force. Being upright when it's raining (which I always am, I haven't honed my wet-riding skills) wouldn't it cause a hydroplane when the water doesn't have any more tread to escape through?

I'm not trying to say I'm right or anything. I'm no engineer, I know there's a reason they do what they do
You may be on to something.
 

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Doesn't that validate my question about the water getting trapped in the tread though?
not really because the contact point with the road is so small on motorcycle tire due to it's profile the amount of water trapped is negligible.
@bpe has the correct answer, the tire pattern is designed for maximum grip. so on the rear the wheel is driven so the force is transmitted to the tire is clockwise, on the front the tire has no drive but requires the grip in the opposite direction for braking anti clockwise, the arrow shows the direction of maximum grip.
some tires are designed for front use only while others are designed for rear use only and have arrows point to the right rotation, however some can be used on either the front or the rear these will have two arrows one on either side wall pointing in different directions for the correct fitment F or R.
 

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Don't forget that there is often a central groove for straight up riding.
 

Fast Old Guy
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back in my cheap racing days, i asked a tire rep:"since Loudon had mostly left turns, could i run a worn tire reversed to save money ? He replied sure except in the rain, as the tread was there only to direct water. hense slicks.
for street use ???
Fog
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
back in my cheap racing days, i asked a tire rep:"since Loudon had mostly left turns, could i run a worn tire reversed to save money ? He replied sure except in the rain, as the tread was there only to direct water. hense slicks.
for street use ???
Fog
After all these years on the forum, the thousands of clueless noobies asking basic questions and not taking any advice, do you think rational reasoning works with me?

I was hoping to slip this one by you fog. I was going to rock the forks and do a proper alignment at the same time, then just blame the tire. Honestly though the tire is just another hard part I want to make sure is 100%. My plan is to take a road trip, 2,000+ miles on this in a few weeks. Which is why I've been shooting the parts cannon so far.
 

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the adage "measure twice, cut once" regarding wood working/metal working applies to changing tyres, at least for me. I remove said bad tyre and throw it on the floor as I took it off the wheel, and look at it five times before mounting next tire. Heard the part about poor racers on the balls of their arse, reversing tyres for the sake of having tread on a specific side of the tyre. Those days are long gone now. Peace.
 

Fast Old Guy
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Having had a tire aquaplane at nearly 100 mph ( I described the result in a earlier post). I would recommend changing that tire if your planning a road trip. Unless yuor going to be only in ArZ, o
 
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