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yes I agree completely @ducatiman. I thought I was the only one sceptical of the last explanation seems not.
a nibble of rubber from the inside rim of the fuel pipe pushing it on to the petcock. or a loose bit of debris from disturbing the system on a bike that had been left a while fair enough. but a tiny spec of dried up residue. when none are to be found anywhere else. nope.
if that is what it was. my question would be where is all the rest of it. fuel doesn't dry up in single little specs does it.
regarding "What's to say any bike can't experience what this one did, maybe pick up a tiny bit in the fuel that can cause a problem? That's no reason to fix something that ain't broke or to agonize over the odds of reoccurrence" the answer to that is preventative maintenance. and I still say those grips are wired up incorrectly first time he leaves them on and parks up returning to bike with a flat battery he will agree " I've got that T shirt"
 

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.... and I still say those grips are wired up incorrectly first time he leaves them on and parks up returning to bike with a flat battery he will agree " I've got that T shirt"
Setting the fuel residue debate to one side, I agree with Yorkie about the direct wiring. Anything directly wired to the bike that can be left on is a flat battery waiting to happen. Ideally, items such as heated grips, should be wired through a switched fuse block that only supplies power with the ignition on.

I, incidentally, wired my heated jacket/gloves directly to the battery, but they get unplugged the moment I walk away from the bike, so power drain isn't an issue.
 

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Agree on the electrical risk.

I think the battery manufacturers would warn against a direct draw against a battery without fuse protection,
possible risk of melted wiring or even battery explosion?

Not worth the risk for the cost of an inline fuse.
 

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Agree on the electrical risk.

I think the battery manufacturers would warn against a direct draw against a battery without fuse protection,
possible risk of melted wiring or even battery explosion?

Not worth the risk for the cost of an inline fuse.
Assuming that even direct battery wiring should always include fuse protection.

My hard-wired heated jacket has an in-line fuse on the positive lead. I want to be toasty....not toasted. :giggle:
 

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Specific gravity readings will tell of the battery's health. You can get a decent hydrometer for about $10-12 on eBay or Amazon.
 

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Specific gravity readings will tell of the battery's health. You can get a decent hydrometer for about $10-12 on eBay or Amazon.
I've migrated to sealed AGM batteries on all my bikes, so I can't test the specific gravity. I have a basic electronic load tester. Beyond that, it's either get it tested at an auto parts store, or more likely just buy a new battery.
 

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hi all. on the question of direct wiring. it is not a good idea at any time but as @Davenay67 says in some circumstances permissible if it can only operate while riding, or for example a system alarm that needs to be active while the bike is parked but even these need some sort of isolator to use if the bike is parked for quite a while.
the thing is the EX is designed with this Aux/Power feed feature built into the fuse box one of each both fused inside the box. no idea why folk never seem to use them.
 

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I have "fixed" several of these cases where a otherwise fine running bike suddenly started to run badly .mostly racebikje that have thing taken off all the time and replaced hurriedly
I often find a snippet of rubber in the carb float valve caused by the sharp edge of the petcock tap shaving it off during assembly . the bit then make its way to the float valve where it either blocks the fuel flow or blocks it open when it gets lodged in the float valve.
This matches the OP's condition perfectlly

FOG
 

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in your scenario @fog, that rubber fragment would have absolutely been caught by the fine rail filter screen. It is a fully PREVENTABLE occurrence, the factory didn't utilize the filter OEM at the final fuel entry point on the ZX6 fer nuthin'.
That little filter worth its weight in gold, will save a lot of headache going forward.
 

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Agree on the electrical risk.

I think the battery manufacturers would warn against a direct draw against a battery without fuse protection,
possible risk of melted wiring or even battery explosion?

Not worth the risk for the cost of an inline fuse.
Oxford Heaterz have both an inline fuse and BSM (battery saving mode). It detects when there is no 'activity' ie ignition shut off and shuts the grips down immediately. If the bike is restarted ie at a fuel fill-up, it stays off for 5 more minutes to allow battery recovery.
 

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Good to go. (y)

Nothing like warm hands on a cold day. :cool:
 

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Yeah, but who needs 'lectricity
 

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My hands don't handle cold at all- I froze them when I was a teen hunting ducks and now I get 'white hand' at the slightest hint of cold. Loggers will know the term; it's caused by vibration (chain saws, motorcycles) and cold weather (frostbite).

Yer hands ain't the same after frostbite. But Oxford heated grips are really good and I've got Gerbing gloves and jacket liner for backup. Cold hands on the controls are a serious impairment to riding safely that I pay attention to. Hypothermia is a real danger. I'll take the heat of July over the cold-weather riding shivers.
 

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Ha. I think that is what cars are for with nice heaters and climate control. far better to have 4 wheels than two on icy roads. beside winter gives you the time to do all that preventative maintenance for a trouble free summer riding season. you want winter riding fine not for me though.
 

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Ha. I think that is what cars are for with nice heaters and climate control. far better to have 4 wheels than two on icy roads. beside winter gives you the time to do all that preventative maintenance for a trouble free summer riding season. you want winter riding fine not for me though.
No winter riding for me, Yorkie, I don't ride much below 10 Celcius, I'm a cold-weather wimp. But I can ride when others melt in the summer heat.

Heated grips are good for these days when the weather can cool off quickly. I prefer unlined gauntlet gloves for a better feel than heavier gloves and the grips really help retain heat.
 

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tried to ride the 20 miles to work one year, and the only thing that works was a snowmobile suit with elephant hands. still the knees got cold in CT winter at 60 mph.
I had to were a shirt & tie so I needed a one piece coverall.

FOG
 

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I still ride all winter, usually wearing shorts and a t-shirt. Sometimes I have to put on a hoodie, but that's for like a few days out of the year. Florida winters are brutal :ROFLMAO:
 

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I suppose that is a comical comment on the weather right. hope so. I had a mate years ago did that. just nipped up to his GF 2 miles away and decided to use the bike. he came off outside a gas station on a patch of oil. think it was around two years before he had finished with all the skin grafts :mad:
 

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I suppose that is a comical comment on the weather right. hope so. I had a mate years ago did that. just nipped up to his GF 2 miles away and decided to use the bike. he came off outside a gas station on a patch of oil. think it was around two years before he had finished with all the skin grafts :mad:
Mostly, I usually have my kevlar lined pants, high top motorcycle shoes, and a t shirt and gloves. I've gone down and sandpapered my arm before, wasn't fun and would not recommend, but its hotter than hell most of the time here so unless I'm going for speed runs the motorcycle jacket stays off. I do wear a backpack though, the last time I went down it cushioned the blow quite a bit even though it was empty. It also held my mirror and other parts that came off the bike on the way home.
 
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