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Tanker Clown
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In an effort to extend my riding season, I elected to find myself a heated vest to wear under my riding gear.

This is a rather tough admission for me to make to be honest. For years now, I’ve stopped riding once the temps dipped below 38-40 degrees because I honestly don’t care for the cold.

This year though, I made it my goal to ride every day, and if I couldn’t ride every day, then as much of each week as possible. So far, the only weeks I’ve missed have been those that I’ve been out of town on vacation.

Back to the heated vest. I’d ridden everyday since I got back from our epic East Coast trip but the temps have been falling steadily. I knew I’d have to do something or I’d wind up driving in when the temps got below that 38-40 degree line in my particular sand.

My requirements were simple. It couldn’t cost a fortune. It had to be independently powered. iE, not by the bike. Most crucially tough it had to be low profile and fit under my riding jackets. After quite a bit of searching I decided a mobile warming vest would be my best bet as most of them ticked at least 2 of those boxes.

I decided on this one:
Because it appeared to tick all 3 of my boxes. It was just $39.99, it has its own battery supply and it’s low profile enough to fit under most of my jackets.

I’ve worn it on my work commute since last week. Temps have gotten as low as 34 degrees F so far and it’s just been stellar. I put it on once I’m dressed and turn on the heat to full. Afterwards I pull the bike out from the garage and let it warm up a bit. All the while the vest is warming.

Once I put my leather jacket on the vest is fully warmed up to a nice toasty level and I’m ready to go. It’s been pleasant riding in as the only parts of me that really start to get cold are my finger tips and chin/lips/nose from the defogging air coming in through my vents. Otherwise I’m between comfortably warm and nice & toasty warm on the way in.

I don’t know if this will be helpful for anyone but it sure keeps me from feeling that chilled to bone feeling. I think it will allow me to ride for the remainder of the year and, with the addition of my rain gear, possibly all through our wet months in early next year too.

Hope this gets someone to reconsider ending their riding early and push on until conditions become “prohibitive”. Happy riding and keep the rubber side down.
 
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This is a good heads up, for both riding and general cold weather wear. Did you find the sizing chart to be accurate? Some reviewers mentioned it was off...maybe a better question is did you do the review from S.O'Leary, as it answers many of my questions?
 

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Tanker Clown
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8,856 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes.
And yes, the ability to use off the bike is what I wanted. That and not having to plug into a bike like with traditional heated riding gear. I didn’t want to have to add harnesses to all my bikes.

Sizing is probably a little off. I went with an XL for a couple reasons, one being other reviewer recommendation. Also, it was my intention to have layers under it too. I normally wear a Large and this particular vest was not offered in a 2XL so XL is what I was left with.

My Amazon review pretty much says it all. About the only thing I can add is, the included battery pack lasts a little over an hour and a half on the highest heat setting. Maybe close to 2 hours.

I’ve run it until the vest stopped heating using all the settings and it lasted around 3 1/2 hours. I use it on high when riding. Middle and low also when off the bike depending on how cold it is.
 
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Fast Old Guy
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dealing with the conflicting requirements of proper attire at work (jackets & tie) and riding in the CT winter. I found a Snowmobile suit was the only thing that worked . It would fit over a suit and keep you warm on my 22 mile commute in 20 wish weather

FOG
 

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The premise of heated vests is to superheat the torso to offset heat loss at the extremities, that is to pump HOT blood into the fingers to maintain temperature.
Ideally the heated vest is snugly over a very thin layer of clothing. As with heated blankets, there is fear of burning with direct skin contact, but you don't want to insulate from the heat source much.
I truly appreciate the brilliance of the heated switch cord, as it allows me to check in the mirror and verify if the thing is on or off, even at night. Being wrong about that sort of thing gets very uncomfortable very quickly.
 

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Tanker Clown
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Also, the heated vest has little bulk to it. At least this one does so it fits nicely under a leather jacket. Once I’m all geared up, I don’t look like Bibendum. That’s the Michelin man’s name.

@fog, I live in Northern California….but it’s still California. A snowmobile suit would be way over kill. Besides, it’s only around freezing in the morning. It’s 65-70 by noon. Harder to stuff a snowmobile suit into a tank bag for the ride home. I can just put the vest on without the heat and be comfy all the way home.
 
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