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Discussion Starter #1
This past summer I read a book called Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, by Robert M. Pirsig. It really didn't have a whole lot to do with motorcycles but I still thought it was a very interesting book. I am going to read it again this summer because I get the feeling that each time you read it, different parts will stand out in your mind, simply due to personal experience.

Another book that I am reading now is called Motorcycle Therapy, by Jeremy Kroeker. It is just a thin little book about a guy who rides from Canmore Alberta to the Panamanian Jungle in South America on a KLR 650. So far it is a very entertaining read.

Has anyone else read either of these?
 

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Zen and the art of motorcycle maintainance by Robert Pirsig is a textbook for philosphy. If I remember correctly his argument was that "value" is subjective.
His next book, Lila, is also excellent.
His work has spawned a cult... almost a religion.
 
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Awesome I'm going to check those books out!
 

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I enjoyed Leanings and Leanings II by Peter Egan. Basically a bunch of short stories so it is easy to read a few sections at a time. I think I have a few of the same screws loose as Egan does so I can really relate to the guy.
 

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Books on cycling aren't stressed enough in my opinion, especially to new riders. One local rider I've met was gracious enough to give me some guidance on both how to ride and what to read.

My first, and the first I suggest to new riders is Proficient Motorcycling by David Hough. It is great for giving you tips to staying alive everyday on a bike. I will re-read it this spring.

My second suggestion is a combo for new riders and more experienced riders who wish to ride harder and safer. It is Total Control by Lee Parks. I would steer new riders to focus on the more basic procedures while learning and building confidence. Then go back to the performance pieces as experience builds. You could take this book too far if you are new to riding, but the basic lessons are invaluable, in my opinion.

Hope these help someone as much as they have helped me. I aspire to race, although age and money will probably stand in the way, but mainly want to enjoy riding and not die doing it. Which ever category you fit, read all you can to train your brain as well as your reflexes.
 

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Kenny Roberts, Wrote a book that I used as a textbook for learning how to ride. I think it was somthing like the art of motorcycle racing. Tells in very specfic detail how the King rode to win.

FOG
 

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I'll second the recommendation of Proficient Motorcycling. I read that book, and even though I'm new, I feel it has contributed more to my ability and willingness to ride safely than anything I've done since the MSF course.
 

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I read "A TWIST OF THE WRIST" VOL 1,2,3 by Keith Code. I liked them very much. there fun to read and hard to put down. I would recommend it to any new rider (vol 1) because vol2 &3 are More for racers.
 
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I read "Sport Riding Techniques" by Nick Ienatsch. Very good read for both the street and track. It has helped my street riding a lot but I haven't been to a track yet so I wouldn't be able to tell you much about that.
 

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I'll second Sport Riding Techniques. Lots of good info. Especially if you have never taken a motorcycle safety course/are self-taught.
 
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books 'bout motorcycling....?

nah, it ain't my thing.

i'll watch the movie though (if there're any)
 

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I'll third "Sport Riding Techniques". It goes beyond MSF and into handling and cornering without being a racing book. I found it very helpful in many areas. Great read and lots of good illustrations.
 

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Awesome posts guys.

Finally, a christmas gift pertaining to my fav hobby that we can actually afford, and something I probably need.

I was self taught, but read and practice on the MSF principles. Will go pick up "Sport Riding Techniques" since pushing it is probably where I'd likely make a mistake, and something I want to ease into the proper way.
 

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steveevets said:
Proficient Motorcycling is an excellent general book .
+1

Also, "More Proficient Motorcycling" and for a diversion might I suggest, "The Perfect Vehicle" and "Two Wheels Through Terror".
Ride safe,
Steve
 
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