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Discussion Starter #1
Well getting into this bike stuff was a little different than I imagined. I figured I would buy a bike, ride it around, take it in to get serviced, ride it around some more and park it in the winter. Well I can't help but do the maintenance myself, and now I am moving on to modifications. The first thing I will be changing is the front end, not because I don't like the way it looks, but because of an unfortunate accident.

The third day I had my bike, I dropped it causing damage to the upper fairing and upper cowling bracket.



As you can see the upper fairing is cracked under the right mirror. I tried to glue it back together, however the upper cowling bracket is slightly bent not allowing it to come together nicely. So I decided I'm going to forget the fairing and start changing the front end. Today I decided to take off the fairing, look underneath and see what I would be working with.



After seeing this, it looks like I'll be removing the upper cowling bracket, replacing the headlight, gauges, mirrors and turn signals. I've never been much of a mechanic, but I think this looks pretty simple. I think most of the challenge will be the electrical stuff. There are plenty of threads on this board regarding front end modifications, and I will be revisiting those a lot for ideas and help.

I'll be updating this thread as I progress. Any advice and input is greatly appreciated.

I forgot to mention, I just sold my car and put $2100 in my pocket and got rid of car payments, which will be allowing me to fund this little project. Hopefully I can put this all together for much less, I'm hoping for under $1000.
 

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Put your money toward a professional repair of the fairing or even a new fairing to keep the value of that brand new bike up there. Remove the fairing and your resale plummets.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
2dogs said:
Put your money toward a professional repair of the fairing or even a new fairing to keep the value of that brand new bike up there. Remove the fairing and your resale plummets.
Yeah I had thought about this. I've spent the morning checking out the wiring and such underneath the fairing. I'm hoping to keep everything stock under there so if/when I decide to sell it, I can put it all back together like it was new.

A replacement upper cowling bracket would run me $105, I'm not sure about the fairing though, I think they're about $300-$500 not including paint.

Frog said:
that adventure is why I strongly recommend getting a used bike for the 1st ride
If only I had done more research before buying a bike. Live and learn right?
 

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mfrankpdx said:
If only I had done more research before buying a bike. Live and learn right?
Right :)

Hopefully someone else will read this before doing the same ;)

I have been using the stock gauges on my 1st gen. It would be easier to keep the stock bracket on there and just put on a new light.

I ended up fixing my crashed bike by taking everything off of it
 

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For the record, there's no reason you can't just bend the fairing stay back into place. If you can figure out what's out of line you could just put it back in line with a pair of Channel Locks, a pipe wrench, a hammer, and whatever else strikes your fancy.

By all means, join the streetfighter club if you'd like, just know that if you like having a fairing you don't necessarily need to start your repairs forking out $105 for that stay.
 

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The easiest way is exactly what Nick said, just find a pipe that fits over the original fairing stay and bend it a little bit at a time until you get it right.

If you ask me I would bend the fairing back to the correct position then try and repair the cowling again. I'm guessing by your original post that you are still a very new rider. That being said i would also expect you to drop the baike again in the near future, nothing against you personally but newer riders tend to have a bunch of accidents early on. Anyway leave the original fairing there for a while and save some money, or even buy the upper fairing and wait to put it on until next year.

After my first small accident with the ex i pushed the left front turn signal through teh fairing cracking it straight down from where the stem bolts to the fairing. Anyway i just found some red zip ties (to match the paint) and drilled some small holes on either side of the crack, zipped it tight with teh excess on the inside, and reinstalled on the bike. unless you really look closely you cant tell, and even when you do look directly at it most peole don't recognize what it was for.
 

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I am still dropping my ride at lights and when I stop at the roadside, I keep slipping on grit, oil, marbles or putting my foot in potholes that can be up to 4 inches deep.. Not counting the amount

what I found was doing the best job protecting the bike was these : http://www.ex-500.com/index.php/topic,2209.msg25510.html#msg25510
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yesterday I worked on bending the upper cowling bracket back into place. I think its pretty close to the original position again. I re-glued the fairing back together and put it back on. It looks better now. My camera battery died, so an "after" pic isn't available at the moment.

derf said:
I'm guessing by your original post that you are still a very new rider. That being said i would also expect you to drop the bike again in the near future, nothing against you personally but newer riders tend to have a bunch of accidents early on.
Yep, just over a month and 2500 miles in the seat. I have dropped it 3 times total, but the first was the worst one. The other drops only resulted in scratched mirrors, and a tiny muffler scratch. Every drop has come from entering an intersection from a stop, making a 90 degree turn, and grabbing too much front brake during the turn because some yahoo driving too fast and startling me. Luckily they were less like "drops" and more like "setting" the bike down on its side.
 

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I am still dropping my ride [...] when I stop at the roadside
Indeed. It's too easy to not be watching what you're doing - and I tend to be a little absent minded about things like that. I did it again this weekend - and broke my damn right mirror AGAIN. I'm guessing they specifically engineer them with the weakest metal possible to prevent damaging the fairing, but they like to snap right at the mount.
 

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ydant said:
Indeed. It's too easy to not be watching what you're doing - and I tend to be a little absent minded about things like that. I did it again this weekend - and broke my damn right mirror AGAIN. I'm guessing they specifically engineer them with the weakest metal possible to prevent damaging the fairing, but they like to snap right at the mount.
I think it's more due to the fact that I'm pulling as far as I can from the cars way, probably too far but I rather drop the bike in the muddy ditch than getting struck by a passing van at 120km/h...

I'm glad it's a light bike :)
 

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My little brother just bought an old kz440, I took him out to an old parking lot today, he must have almost dropped the bike about a dozen times. The bike only went all the way down one time, but it caused the shifter bent a little and he couldn't upshift into 2nd, finally figured out what it was and was able to go faster than 25mph. Lesson learned: check everything after it falls down.
 

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And let it sit fora awhile in the upright position so the fluids go back where they're supposed to be ;)
 
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