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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So the green wire to the guages neutral light is actually a neutral so hooking it to a regular light is unlikely to work. Im not sure the best solution but mine was to attach a simple single pole dual throw (SPDT) relay wired the following way. Hope this helps someone.
 

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hi, there is no reason to overthink this, the neutral light is part of the lockout safety switch system. the power for the bulb is in the cluster, the switch is just the earth point that lights the bulb by grounding it.
on the gen2 I do not have any safety switches as I slimmed down the main harness to build the cruiser. but still have the neutral light, because the power for it is built into the gauges (ER500 stock cluster).
so whether the neutral indicator (in a aftermarket set) would work depends on where the power for it comes from.
a standard bulb or LED would work if the power is provided to the bulb from the ignition circuit and the output wire is connected to the switch to ground it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If you have access to both leads. I bought a simple 2240:60 speedometer with a neutral, high beam, and turn signal indicator integrated that has a single negative lead for all lighting. This guage is looking for a positive on neutral whicb my clumbsy solution provides.
 

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If you have access to both leads. I bought a simple 2240:60 speedometer with a neutral, high beam, and turn signal indicator integrated that has a single negative lead for all lighting. This guage is looking for a positive on neutral whicb my clumbsy solution provides.
Ok if it works for you guess that is fine. but in my logical mind. I can't see any issues to solve.
because, if you are not using the stock clockset you will still have the plug ends on the main harness that went to it, all the positive and negative wires you need are right there in those plugs (which BTW are standard configuration plugs available at most auto suppliers) just feed those wires to the new clock job done.
the other puzzling thing to me is why use a standard 4TR (4 terminal relay) and override the relay by joining both power wires to the same source, (keeping the relay energised) it's not what a relay is designed for. one positive wire direct to the bulb would have worked just fine.
I don't have a US diagram handy but on (UK) models the bulb wiring is.
1. clock illumination in, red/blue, out black and yellow.
2. indicators left green in black/yellow out, right grey in black/yellow out.
3. main beam red/black in black/yellow out
4. oil light brown in blue/red out
5. neutral switch brown in light green out.
all those wires are there in the plug ends, the majority of the bulbs are power in earth out but the oil light and neutral light are power in and respective power out to the switches. the best wiring solutions are always the simplest.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ok if it works for you guess that is fine. but in my logical mind. I can't see any issues to solve.
because, if you are not using the stock clockset you will still have the plug ends on the main harness that went to it, all the positive and negative wires you need are right there in those plugs (which BTW are standard configuration plugs available at most auto suppliers) just feed those wires to the new clock job done.
the other puzzling thing to me is why use a standard 4TR (4 terminal relay) and override the relay by joining both power wires to the same source, (keeping the relay energised) it's not what a relay is designed for. one positive wire direct to the bulb would have worked just fine.
I don't have a US diagram handy but on (UK) models the bulb wiring is.
1. clock illumination in, red/blue, out black and yellow.
2. indicators left green in black/yellow out, right grey in black/yellow out.
3. main beam red/black in black/yellow out
4. oil light brown in blue/red out
5. neutral switch brown in light green out.
all those wires are there in the plug ends, the majority of the bulbs are power in earth out but the oil light and neutral light are power in and respective power out to the switches. the best wiring solutions are always the simplest.
Because there is a single negative lead for all illumination in the clock. There is no way to wire a passive negative trigger. The backlight, the turn indicators, the neutral indicator and high beam indicator all use the same negative lead. All but the neutral send power when active. Neutral is always powered with the brown lead that also powers the coolant and tach gauges. I have to convert the passive neutral trigger to an active one.
 

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AHHH, Ok I see cheap cost cutting Chinese utility wiring crap. all the ones I've seen had 2 wires for each bulb usually connected to a block. on the end of the wires. 3 wires for the tacho (as stock) basically plug and play once you have configured the correct wires. carry on I'm sure you will figure it out.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Cheap or expensive most modern clusters use led lighting or lcd screens which carry a common negative terminal. This solution deals with ANY cluster that does not have giant incandescent bulbs... And I did figure it out. Its in the first post.
 

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Sounds super confusing.
I did the same thing with a new LED gauge except it didn't have indicators so I wired in a bunch of separate ones on a bracket I made.
Neutral is grounded at the green wire and fed by the brown. Here's the clearest res pic of wiring I could find if it helps you.

Light Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Audio equipment Eyewear

Cameras & optics Gadget Audio equipment Input device Camera lens

Rectangle Schematic Font Floor plan Parallel
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Sounds super confusing.
I did the same thing with a new LED gauge except it didn't have indicators so I wired in a bunch of separate ones on a bracket I made.
Neutral is grounded at the green wire and fed by the brown. Here's the clearest res pic of wiring I could find if it helps you.

View attachment 56257
View attachment 56256
View attachment 56255
Again, so long as you have access to both leads this isn't an issue. This solution is for clusters with a common negative wherein you cannot access each individual lead.
 

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I am going to assume that when in neutral the contact is closed and anything with a positive feed is powered up by this switch. About $00.60
Using a IN4005 diode rated at 1 amp & 600 volts-I suggest this as it is very popular, a IN4003 or https://www.vishay.com/docs/88503/1n4001.pdf.
If what I said is correct, connecting the neutral switch wire to the cathode and your LED negative terminal to the anode. Then connecting your positive terminal of your LED to a fused positive source or what ever you wish to use this circuit for. The reason for the diode, it prevents the positive source feeding into the neutral wire circuit through the added LED , just in case the positive source for the neutral switch was open or missing.


 

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I am going to assume that when in neutral the contact is closed and anything with a positive feed is powered up by this switch. About $00.60
yeah the neutral switch is plunger type earth point for the light. when in neutral the plunger is pushed closing the switch (or visa versa I can't remember off hand) and allowing the power through to earth (via the case) that lights it up. when any gear is selected, the plunger releases and the contact is opened. (for instance) if you pull the wire off the switch and earth it out the light comes on.
 
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