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Tanker Clown
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
If anyone is not familiar with parts 1-2 links are below:





I decided on a new direction for this project some time back. It has been on the counter as there has just been too much on my plate for it to even rate the back burner.

A few months back, I moved the old oil boiler from the corner of the garage; where it’s sat for several years to my bike work bench.

I’ve been scouring eBay for parts required to convert the old oil boiler from a 1992 body to a 1988/89 body.

Also, I intend to change the appearance from its current Suzuki Pearl Novelty Black to the classic Blue/light blue/white during this project.

To that end, I found a blue white tank on eBay for not a great deal of money. It has a couple of dents that will need to be fixed….incurring a repaint as well.
Postal scale Font Helmet Automotive design Automotive lighting

The really critical parts for the conversion that were the hardest to find for reasonable $$ are the head light bucket and front subframe.

I was finally able to find those two parts this month, again on eBay. I’ll update again once I start making progress beyond collecting parts.

It won’t be weekly, nor even monthly just as I find time to get things done now that it has been promoted to the back burner once again.
 
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Tanker Clown
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8,856 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Update #1:

Several new developments have taken place since the last post so I figured it was time to update this thread.

The head light bucket arrived and is exactly as described. I thought to use the head light from the 1992 head light bucket to replace the missing one on the 1989 head light bucket.

That was a definite no-go as the bulb housing is different from ‘89 to the ‘92. Looks like I have to find another bulb housing to replace the missing one now.

The upper fairing stay/head light bucket mount also arrived and is completely not the correct one. It was listed as for an 88-89 but is actually for ‘86-‘87 MYs. Not sure where I want to go from there.

I could keep searching for an ‘89 or I can get some tubing and just make my own. Apparently the ‘89 is a blend of the ‘87 & ‘92. As I have both now, should be able to just copy the parts of each to make one and weld up a reproduction.

Some months back I got a PDR kit from Amazon for around $18. Mainly I got it for the puller bridge which is alloy and I figured would work no matter what I used to attach to the dent. Here’s the tool with some of the “sticks” for dent pulling:
Wood Musical instrument Tool Ball-peen hammer Hand tool


The tank had 3 dents, each differing in type & complexity. Starting on the right side of the tank, there was a fairly deep, but also complex dent where the metal was stretched. For that I got some similar length bolts of the same thread from the hardware store and welded them on the dent.
Tire Automotive tire Hood Motor vehicle Automotive exterior


This worked quite well and I was able to pull the dent almost completely out. It’s out enough for a thin layer of filler to take care of what’s left.
Hood Automotive tire Automotive lighting Azure Motor vehicle


Here you can see all the remaining low spots….the dent was that big and that deep. There was a small dent on top of the tank that came out just with the tools in the kit. If I were not painting the tank, it could just be buffed out and waxed it came out that good. Then there was the dent on the left side of tank.
Motor vehicle Hood Automotive tire Automotive lighting Automotive design

Hood Automotive design Automotive exterior Automotive lighting Automotive decal


You can see the depth from the space behind the tape measure. As bad as it looks, this was a pretty easy dent to pull. I only used the included tools, and glue sticks. The only tool outta my tool box was a hammer to help tease the dent out.

Grille Hood Automotive lighting Automotive tire Motor vehicle


Below after a quick block sand to find the low spots:

Automotive lighting Hood Motor vehicle Automotive design Helmet


Ready for filler and primer. More later when I get back to this
 
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Tanker Clown
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8,856 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Lot.
Of.
Work.
Yes, yea it is. Not too difficult though, just gotta be patient and feel what the metal is doing. Once the filler and primer is done, then things get difficult.
 

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Tanker Clown
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Update 1.5:
I was going to wait until I made more progress on this project before a full update, but consider this one about halfway to a full one. There was one other bit of damage I did not include in my previous posts.

Due to being poorly packed for shipping the Barb fitting on the top of the vent “hump” was pushed in. This created a dent that popped the paint off in the affected areas. I was at a loss for how exactly to tackle this dent due to its location and the height of the vent bump above the rest of the tank.
Hood Automotive lighting Automotive design Motor vehicle Automotive exterior

I was struck with a bit of inspiration and the solution was stupidly simple. I used a claw hammer and a bit of 2X6 as a fulcrum and popped the dented in hump right out. Above is the result.

Once that was done, I got out some carbon/Kevlar cloth out to get a nice thin base layer for the filler to bind to. First though, I had to ensure there were no pinholes incurred by welding on the damaged part of the tank.

I poured in a bit of paint thinner (mineral spirits) and found there was indeed a pin hole. After draining off the thinner and waiting quite a while for it to flash off, I welded a bead around the area where the leak was. Didn’t work, made it worse. Repeat the process and finally after a much more extensive bead than one would think necessary, no more leak.

Wiped down with alcohol and set to patching the repaired area with a layer of carbon/Kevlar. I use a West Systems marine grade epoxy for this sort of thing. I call it a “bullet proof” repair. Just because of the Kevlar….bullet proof vests and all that.
White Liquid Hood Light Automotive tire


Once this cured for a week or so, I sanded it back a bit with some 220 grit. After another wipe down with some alcohol, I mixed up a small batch of filler. Probably less than a teaspoon worth. Once applied and cured, I used a wood rasp to take down the high spots. Once it was shaped more or less as it should be, I hand sanded with a block and some 220.
Hood Automotive lighting Automotive tire Sleeve Vehicle

Sky Slope Snow Freezing Geological phenomenon


Little more to go on this spot. A skim coat for sure and maybe a bit of glazing putty to fill any tiny imperfections. Anyway, that’s it for the mini update. More later
 
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