Ex-500.com - The home of the Kawasaki EX500 / Ninja 500R banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I took off the tank to service the bike. I saw that the fuel lines were badly worn so I replaced them with fuel line from auto parts store.

Now I am trying to put things back together, and I realize zero gas is coming from the gas valve. Not a drop. I know very little about these things but I am thinking the 1/4 line I bought for the vacuum on the valve is not air tight and prevents the gas from coming out (?) Or the vacuum side of the valve is clogged. Or maybe the gas side of the valve is clogged.

All I know is the valve worked fine before I took the tank off. Now absolutely nothing comes out of it.

Some things to note:

The bike started fine and ran on the gas already in the carbs, then stopped when carbs ran dry.

I know that no gas was coming out when I had it hooked up because I installed a clear fuel filter, and it remained empty.

There are no leaks or drips

There are no crimps in the line

There's gas in the tank

****
I'm going to fiddle with it more this evening. But if the problem is obvious to y'all, I'd appreciate any pointers you could give me. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
I took off the tank to service the bike. I saw that the fuel lines were badly worn so I replaced them with fuel line from auto parts store.

Now I am trying to put things back together, and I realize zero gas is coming from the gas valve. Not a drop. I know very little about these things but I am thinking the 1/4 line I bought for the vacuum on the valve is not air tight and prevents the gas from coming out (?) Or the vacuum side of the valve is clogged. Or maybe the gas side of the valve is clogged.

All I know is the valve worked fine before I took the tank off. Now absolutely nothing comes out of it.

Some things to note:

The bike started fine and ran on the gas already in the carbs, then stopped when carbs ran dry.

I know that no gas was coming out when I had it hooked up because I installed a clear fuel filter, and it remained empty.

There are no leaks or drips

There are no crimps in the line

There's gas in the tank

****
I'm going to fiddle with it more this evening. But if the problem is obvious to y'all, I'd appreciate any pointers you could give me. Thanks.
If it were me, I'd dry-run the tank and fuel valve operation off the bike and on a bench.

I'd start with no fuel line in place at all. Apply some vacuum to the vacuum port on the fuel valve using your new vacuum line and make sure fuel flows in the On position. If fuel does not flow, see if you can find another line to test with. If fuel still does not flow then the fuel valve itself may be suspect and need overhaul. If fuel does flow then then I'd check the connection to the carbs of your new vacuum line.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thank you very much. I will give it a shot this evening. Would "sucking on the new vacuum line" = applying some vacuum?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
Thank you very much. I will give it a shot this evening. Would "sucking on the new vacuum line" = applying some vacuum?
It would, but that's nasty. :)

My preferred method is a tool like a MityVac, which comes in useful for brake jobs as well....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
315 Posts
Three thoughts:

1. If the petcock was working fine before you "improved" things, its almost certainly something you did rather than the valve picking that particular moment to go bad.

2. Any chance you might have reversed the 2 lines at the petcock when you hooked everything back up?

3. Sure, sucking on a vacuum line is potentially nasty, but its a quick check. Just avoid swallowing and keep a beer handy so you can rinse your mouth afterwards.:smile2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
Three thoughts:

1. If the petcock was working fine before you "improved" things, its almost certainly something you did ........

3. ....... Just avoid swallowing and keep a beer handy so you can rinse your mouth afterwards.:smile2:
No wiser words
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,905 Posts
I don't see what is "nasty" about sucking on the vacuum line. At most all your going to draw in is a little air. And if it is working properly, you wont even suck in any air.

In castorp's case, he's even got a new vacuum line.

If you guys think this is nasty, look in to some of the stuff that ends up in your food. :surprise:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
315 Posts
petcocksucking :eek: or syringe :wink2: .....your choice in achieving same goal
Yeah, but lips are free; syringes cost money. Besides, most on this forum probably have gas running in their veins already so why fuss about a little gassy flavor? (I'm going to try to ignore the image you just put in my mind. This thread is starting to devolve and is proof positive that winter is finally taking its toll.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Thanks guys. I've been chuckling while reading over this and I needed it.

I sucked. The gas flowed (and not into my mouth). Looks like I just need to tighten down that vacuum hose a little more. So hopefully, problem solved.

Now I'm cleaning out a filthy airbox, which I had to take out because my hand wouldn't fit between the carbs to attached the new gas line. The more I take things apart, the more I see to do.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,486 Posts
1/4" ID is, in fact, too large for the vac fitting. If you can swing it, bring the petcock to auto parts store to test fit and assure your choice will be air tight going forward.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
315 Posts
The Wiki calls for 5mm (.197") i.d. vacuum line from the carb to the petcock. Assuming the Wiki is correct, some 3/16" i.d. (.187") vacuum hose from the local auto parts store should do the trick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Thank you. As the vac line was in pretty good shape (the fuel line was the one that was bad) I reused it, for now. And the bike runs fine. But I am making a note of the measurements needed.

This line change was, for me, one of those things that was a lot more time consuming and tedious than I thought it would be. First the vacuum issue (totally my ignorance there). Then I had to take out the airbox to hook up the line cause I coudln't get my hand inbetween the carbs to tighten a clamp. Then cleaning the air box, which it needed (what a mess!). Then trying to fit those rubber boot things to the carbs and to the airbox without pulling them off one or out of the other. Very tedious. Now I'm going to make copious notes, because I will forget everything by the time i need to do this again. Thanks again, y'all. You help me keep this thing running.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
530 Posts
removing replacing the carbs is not that difficult when you have the knack. it helps if remove the two side panels of the airbox. this allows a inch or so of movement offer carbs into place cables pipes attached fit the engine to carb rubbers on and clamp them then fit the airbox rubbers to back of carbs fix spring clips then with clamps on the front rubbers ease them onto the engine ports give a push there on tighten last two clamps refit airbox side cases job done less than 5mins.

edit. almost forgot you may have to relocate the oil breather pipe to the airbox easy done with long flat screwdriver it sometimes pops off when the box it moved back
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
I'm not sure I follow you, Yorkie. I did remove the side panels to the air box. No problem there. And the oil breather pipe was no issue. popped it off and later back into place. No problem. I knew to pull the springs back from the "boots" that connect the airbox to the carbs. All that went fairly smoothly.

My mistake was when putting it back together I was trying first to work the rubber boots into the airbox. Coudln't get them onto the carbs when I did them that way. (Figured this out after multiple attempts.). Then I tried putting the rubber "boots" over the carbs first, pushing the springs into place, to hold them onto the carbs (somewhat), and working the lip of the rubber "boots" into the airbox VERY CAREFULLY. By pushing down on the carbs and working the lips in centimeter by centimeter i was FINALLY able to work them into the airbox without pulling the damn things off the carbs. It really became suspenseful, after a certain number of failed attempts. And all over an air box! No doubt the next time it will be a bit easier because I'll know what to do but I doubt I'll ever be able to do that job in five minutes or even close. My opinion of the airbox on this bike is about like my opinion of getting the valve cover off to do the valve check: the designers seemed to have paid pretty much Zero concern to ease of maintenance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
530 Posts
ok it was just a suggestion it's how I do mine and believe me that's a few times. don't really understand how it could be that difficult to locate the carbs onto the airbox with the carbs virtually loose in your hand. but hey I said there was a knack to it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
315 Posts
I agree its not a fun job. My "trick" is to spray the rubber parts with some WD-40. Once they are a bit slippery, things seem to go much better. The WD soon evaporates and doesn't hurt anything.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top