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I live in New York and store my bike from the beginning of November until the beginning of April each year. Right before the bike goes into storage, I change the oil and the filter. I only I run it enough to make sure that I have the right amount of oil in the bike. I use Shell Rotella T Synthetic 5W-40 every time.

Spring comes and I then I ride about 500 miles and then change the oil and filter again. Last two years in a row, I have been asked why I changed the oil by the garage I drop it off at. The service guy commented that the oil looked fine. And it did. Mileage wise, it's fine. But is is more complicated because it sits all winter? And now I don't even remember where I got it in my head to change it after 500 miles.

Basically, I am asking if its wasteful to do it so soon. If not, why not? If so, how many miles can I go? Or how much time can I go? Thanks.
 

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The point of the fall change is to get ride of the acids that will eat you engine all winter, In the spring if you can ride the bike for a long enough period to boil off any condensation accumlated over the winter , then there is no reason not to change at a normal time of 3000 Miles or whatever.

FOG
 

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3000 (3 thousand) odometer miles.

It could vary... a person who cruises 3000 miles commuting, with fewer shifts, ought not be wearing things like those who use the upper revs & lots of shifts. Most folks here that write on the topic say the major worry is the crud from the clutch. (The 500 uses the motor oil for the tranny & clutch too.)

Seems like a rider who drives conservatively & uses synthetic oughta be able to run the oil to say 5000 miles (in a single season) while changing the oil filter at, say, 2500. But I'm in a minority on this hypothesis and haven't tried it myself.

I haven't seem anything about changing the oil based on the tach's 1000r/min meter.
Anyone with info on that?
 

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It really tickles me that you guy's (no one in particular) don't blink at dropping 3-400 bucks on a tin trumpet to make noise. But balk at frequent oil changes that will save your engine. What 2.1/2 quart of even the ridiculous priced purple goo is what 10-12 bucks. Stop being penny wise and pound foolish. Studies have shown that ordinary Dino Oil looses 1/2 it rated viscosity in as little as 800 miles. Clean or not that oil is shot. The blends of MC specific are no better. Finally full Synthetics are the best but still reach 1/2 viscosity rating @1800 miles.

It's fortunate that plain bearing engines can regulate there bearing clearances with heat. up to a point. but once the Viscosity drops to say 1/2 is rating the oil can no longer keep the metal parts apart. Bearing wear results. BTW the oiliness or slipperiness of a oil has almost no use in a modern engine except at the top 1/4" of ring movement where the rings are stopped and sink through the oil film that they normally plane over. At this point the molecular strength of the compound not the bond strength counts. The other point is on the cam lobe , at the point of maximum acceleration.

Don't cheap it out on oil change it often

FOG
 
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Might as well just change it, FOG is right, it's not a lot of money for something that is vital to your engine.

I change my oil and filter in both my car and bike way before required all the time - the bike is always at the 2,500-3,000 KM mark, and my car is always right on 5,000 KMs. Treat your engine like a princess and it'll always work!
 

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A british club quoting Consumer Reports oil testing w/ taxi's
http://www.triumphspitfire.com/Oiltest.html

Consumer Reports, with one of the most widely respected product testing laboratories in the world has just released the results of an extensive test on oil brands and oil changes, as well as other issues regarding car care. In the process, the test demolished much of the conventional wisdom regarding car lubrication. The two most surprising results: the frequency with which oil is changed doesn't matter after the first few oil changes on a new engine, and the type or brand of oil used can not be shown to make any difference.

The testers placed freshly rebuilt engines in 75 New York taxis and then ran them for nearly two years, with each cab racking up 60,000 miles, placing different brands and weights in different cars and changing the oil at 3,000 miles in half the cars and 6,000 in the other half. At the conclusion of the test period, the engines were torn down, measured and inspected. The conclusions: Regardless of brand of oil or weight, no measurable differences could be observed in engine wear. Furthermore, there was no difference among cars which had oil changed at the shorter or longer interval.

Does this have any bearing on the enthusiast's car, which is given almost the opposite usage stored for long periods of time then started and driven for short distances? The tests suggested that our type of usage would build up sludge and varnish, indicating that an annual or semi-annual oil change is a good idea regardless of how much mileage the car is driven. But there is little indication that the brand or weight needs to be given serious consideration, and synthetic oil has no discernible advantage over the old stand-bys. More information on the tests and results can be obtained from Consumers Union or the July issue of Consumer Reports available at most libraries.

Source: British Car Magazine, October-November 1996

Related Stories:

More Than You Ever Wanted to Know About Motor Oil

An Excerpt from a SAE Oil Filter Test
 

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The biggie here is: there is no transmission chewing up the oil in cars.
FOG
 

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Cabbies don't have heat up as often as our bikes (not talking about overheating, just reaching optimal operating temp)

where I am, cabbies are running 24/7, multiple drivers for the same cab.. Their engine is off only when they are filling the tank, so it always stay warm.. And they last for ever just because they don't go through the whole temperature span.

I wonder if this was taken in consideration ???
 

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I've been hunting around on line for more info & ran into this article that looks familiar... so may've been posted on an oil topic some months ago. The parts specifically about motorcycles are in the bottom 4th.

http://motorcycleinfo.calsci.com/Oils1.html

His initial qualifier:
"I am not a lubrication, filtering, chemical or mechanical engineer. I have a degree in engineering, but I studied electrical engineering. I now study physics. You may feel free to question my abilities to gather facts and draw conclusions in the area of oils and filters. In any case, this is a write up of what I learned in about 75 hours of research on this topic. My only interest is having my motorcycle run forever, never break, and be easy to maintain."

One of his paragraphs...
"In 1994, Dr. John Woolum tested the viscosity of several 10w-40 oils in his motorcycle. He found that all of the petroleum oils had lost highly significant amounts of viscosity within 1500 miles. Only Mobil-1 held up in his test. I have personally tested Delvac-1 synthetic in my ST1300. It was 5w-40 when I put it in, and 5w-25 9,200 miles later. By 1500 miles, the petroleum oils Dr. Woolum tested were at 10w-25 equivalent. By contrast, Dr. Woolum tested a petroleum oil in his Honda Accord. After 3600 miles, the 10w-40 oil was 10w-37 equivalent. Motorcycles are indeed significantly harder on their oils than cars. Based on this result and the VI numbers above, it would seem that 10w-40, 5w-20, and 5w-30 oils cannot be safely used in motorcycles for more than 1,000 to 1,500 miles."

His conclusions run w/ FOG's. He does have a higher regard for synthetics though.
I sure would like to find some similar recent tests on current oils.
 

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but that was the state of oil 13 yeas ago... they've come a ways since then. that's like reading a paper on Personal Computers from 1994!
 

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Knightslugger said:
but that was the state of oil 13 yeas ago... they've come a ways since then. that's like reading a paper on Personal Computers from 1994!
I agree... I went back & put the last sentence in bold.
Computer advancement has been spectacular... can any other industry product match it?
Imagine if oil qualities had kept up... !!!
 

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Knightslugger said:
but that was the state of oil 13 yeas ago... they've come a ways since then. that's like reading a paper on Personal Computers from 1994!
No they haven't. in fact they have retrogresed with the advent of ultra low friction modifiers.
FOG
 

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FOG said:
Knightslugger said:
but that was the state of oil 13 yeas ago... they've come a ways since then. that's like reading a paper on Personal Computers from 1994!
No they haven't. in fact they have retrogresed with the advent of ultra low friction modifiers.
FOG
how is that a step back? do tell...
 

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MrSciTrek said:
A british club quoting Consumer Reports oil testing w/ taxi's
http://www.triumphspitfire.com/Oiltest.html

Consumer Reports, with one of the most widely respected product testing laboratories in the world has just released the results of an extensive test on oil brands and oil changes, as well as other issues regarding car care. In the process, the test demolished much of the conventional wisdom regarding car lubrication. The two most surprising results: the frequency with which oil is changed doesn't matter after the first few oil changes on a new engine, and the type or brand of oil used can not be shown to make any difference.

The testers placed freshly rebuilt engines in 75 New York taxis and then ran them for nearly two years, with each cab racking up 60,000 miles, placing different brands and weights in different cars and changing the oil at 3,000 miles in half the cars and 6,000 in the other half. At the conclusion of the test period, the engines were torn down, measured and inspected. The conclusions: Regardless of brand of oil or weight, no measurable differences could be observed in engine wear. Furthermore, there was no difference among cars which had oil changed at the shorter or longer interval.

Does this have any bearing on the enthusiast's car, which is given almost the opposite usage stored for long periods of time then started and driven for short distances? The tests suggested that our type of usage would build up sludge and varnish, indicating that an annual or semi-annual oil change is a good idea regardless of how much mileage the car is driven.
I live in upstate NY and I always change the oil in the spring, and again in the fall before putting the bike away for the winter.

Thanks for the consumer reports article ...... but, two points here guys,

1. I don't drive like a NY taxi driver
2. The test didn't include resting in a utility shed for 4 months of the year

conclusion, change the oil in the spring, and in the fall (and the middle of summer if you ride a lot)
 

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Knightslugger said:
FOG said:
Knightslugger said:
but that was the state of oil 13 yeas ago... they've come a ways since then. that's like reading a paper on Personal Computers from 1994!
No they haven't. in fact they have retrogressed with the advent of ultra low friction modifiers.
FOG
how is that a step back? do tell...
Well they have added slippry elements thatYour engine doesn't need and can prevent your clutch and starter from working, there is little use for slipperiness in an engine. It's mostly sales gimmick Like the Big Sumo Wrestler trying to hold onto a screwdriver dipped in STP.
 

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less friction lets the engine do more work without giving some energy to managing oil. it's miniscule i agree, but it's an improvement. however in a motorcycle engine with a wet clutch it would be bad news. looking at a broader scheme though it's a good thing.
 
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