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Discussion Starter #1
While tinkering with the bike yesterday I noticed something and wanted to know if anyone has any feedback.

While on the center stand and in neutral, I pulled on the throttled just a bit and noticed something in the corner of my eye. I pulled again harder... I wasn't seeing things, the rear wheel was moving! Not as if it where in gear but it was moving. The harder I pulled on the throttle the more it would spin, almost like snowmobile operation.

Is this normal? Is my clutch toast? Glazed?... ???
 

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PontiacJack said:
While tinkering with the bike yesterday I noticed something and wanted to know if anyone has any feedback.

While on the center stand and in neutral, I pulled on the throttled just a bit and noticed something in the corner of my eye. I pulled again harder... I wasn't seeing things, the rear wheel was moving! Not as if it where in gear but it was moving. The harder I pulled on the throttle the more it would spin, almost like snowmobile operation.

Is this normal? Is my clutch toast? Glazed?... ???
Mine did the same thing.. 2005 w/ 3k miles.
Maybe it's just related to the vibration patterns through the swingarm or chain.
It doesn't seem like it's a symptom of a problem.
But I will gladly yield that opinion to more knowledgable heads.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Mine is a 2006 with over 11,000 miles. Original clutch, gear, and chain.
I don't think it is the vibrations running through the bike spinning the wheel. As I pulled harder on the throttle the spinning of the wheel increased, however, you could be right. I just brainstormed an experiment if you will. When I get back home today I am going to try and hold the wheel and see if there is any resistance, I guess a redneck way to identify if there is actually any power being transferred to the rear wheel.
 

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it's normal. there's always a little friction there. it's not nearly enough to drive the wheel with any discernible power. your hand will stop the wheel. if it doesn't, you need to adjust your clutch cable. just be careful back there while the engine is running...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm a huge worry wort about chains fans etc... Thanks for the warning plus answer. So what your saying is there is always a minimal amount of contact?
 

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It's not contact because the clutch is engaged. it's just kinda sticky or thickish in the transmission and that wee bit of thickness or stickyness makes a tiny bit of friction in the transmission and makes it spin ever so slightly. It pretty much disappears when the oil starts to warm up.
 
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Oddly enough I noticed mine do that just yesterday when winterizing. Had it on the centre stand and was letting hte engine run for a bit to get the stab in the carbs. Looked back and saw the rear wheel moving a bit. Stopped once the engine warmed up completely.

Happy to hear my clutch doesn't need work now, because I was getting ready to research the parts I need for that!
 

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The clutch has no bearing on this. It's totally normal and is a result of the minor friction present in the idler bearings in the transmission gears. It may be more prevalent when the oil is cold but is normal at anytime. Don't worry about it... and stay away from the rear wheel when it's spinning, especially near the chain and sprockets. Just the flywheel effect of that spinning can do SERIOUS damage to your bodily parts.
 
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Ha, after seeing that one guys fingers as a result of a chain accident, I keep my hands far from that area when running the bike, and always have the bike OFF if I'm lubing or adjusting something back there..
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Royson said:
Ha, after seeing that one guys fingers as a result of a chain accident, I keep my hands far from that area when running the bike, and always have the bike OFF if I'm lubing or adjusting something back there..
ditto

I USED to lube the chain with the bike in gear...wd40 with a nozzle, seemed safe enough... but then again riding a motorcycle is enough risk as it is.
 
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PontiacJack said:
I USED to lube the chain with the bike in gear...wd40 with a nozzle, seemed safe enough... but then again riding a motorcycle is enough risk as it is.
WD40= TEH EV1L!!!11!
 

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Unless you're washing or otherwise removing the WD40 off the chain directly after cleaning it, you're damaging o-rings. actually, the phrase "Lubing the Chain" isn't very accurate. you're sealing the bare metal to prevent rusting and lubricating the exposed rubber o-rings so they don't rot away. granted WD40 is a great cleaner and displaces water fantastically, but it also acts as a penetrating oil. WD40 will get behind the sealed o-rings and dissolve the grease inside of them. there's plenty of force on the o-ring to keep it sealed and you'd think that it would be sufficient enough to keep it out, but believe it or not, it will get in there. also, WD40 deteriorates the rubber over time.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Knightslugger said:
Unless you're washing or otherwise removing the WD40 off the chain directly after cleaning it, you're damaging o-rings. actually, the phrase "Lubing the Chain" isn't very accurate. you're sealing the bare metal to prevent rusting and lubricating the exposed rubber o-rings so they don't rot away. granted WD40 is a great cleaner and displaces water fantastically, but it also acts as a penetrating oil. WD40 will get behind the sealed o-rings and dissolve the grease inside of them. there's plenty of force on the o-ring to keep it sealed and you'd think that it would be sufficient enough to keep it out, but believe it or not, it will get in there. also, WD40 deteriorates the rubber over time.
"ditto

I USED to lube the chain with the bike in gear...wd40 with a nozzle, seemed safe enough... but then again riding a motorcycle is enough risk as it is."

Sorry I kinda worded it funny ... BUT I'm glad I did, I was just told not to used WD-40 when some gearhead buddy on mine saw me using it. Never explained why... maybe he was like me, was told not to but never asked why... Now i know!

So I guess the p/b weld penatrating lubricant is out too huh? :)

I forget what I'm using now but its pretty good I'll post again when I get home and can put the proper name up here and everything.
 

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There are some topics where you just can't win.
What oil is best?
What is the best break in procedure?
How to maintain your chain?

I vote to ban all such questions or discussions. :D

Discussions go as follows: YES NO YES NO You're just as bad as Hitler!
 
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a) my '97 with 37kmiles started turning the countersprocket one time (the rear assembly was off), and it kind of freaked me out.
b) Do Ducatis (dry clutch) bikes not do this at all then?
 
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