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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,
I used to race Ex's and post over at the micapeak site a few years ago but I've been off for quite a while since I switched bikes (from an EX to an SV to a Buell now).
I need to do some plastic repair and I've been searching for how to do it. I recall prior discussions about shaving plastic pieces off of scrap but I don't remember how it was melted down and flowed onto the piece. Anyone want to enlighten an old poster on this?
Thanks,
Don
 

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Don,
The best way it to use a plastic welder and rod made of the correct plastic for you part. Likely ABS. The welder is a industrial strength Hair Dryer that focuses the heat into a very small area. and is use just like a brazing torch. You heat the two pcs. to be joined and the rod into a puddle and let it cool. You'll need to sand and re finish the repair too. I've had some success using a soldering Iron too.

FOG
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks FOG. Nice to see you're still contributing to cause. I've got a spare soldering iron that I can afford to muck up with plastic so I'll try that first.
 

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Cook said:
Thanks FOG. Nice to see you're still contributing to cause. I've got a spare soldering iron that I can afford to muck up with plastic so I'll try that first.
If that doesn't work you can get a plastic welder at Harbor Freight for around $45 , I think it was .
 

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I gather that there's no such thing as a liquid chemical glue for this type of plastic?
I'm thinking of past years when building model cars & planes.
 

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MrSciTrek said:
I gather that there's no such thing as a liquid chemical glue for this type of plastic?
I'm thinking of past years when building model cars & planes.
Yes there is, At any plumbing supply store or Home De Poo. you can by ABS cement. It work good to. I did a lot of repairs with it. Till I did my VFR and spent a lot of money on a Paint job. Only to discover the Abs Cement continues to Shrink for a long time after it is hard. Now I hve depressions wherever I made a repair that was invisable when it was painted.
If you work on the back side and renforce the crack with anothe piece of scrap the joint is stronger than the originol. You can even glue those pins that always break off the insides of the tail pieces with it.

FOG
 

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Discussion Starter #7
FOG said:
If you work on the back side and renforce the crack with anothe piece of scrap the joint is stronger than the originol.
FOG
Bingo! That'll work just fine. It's a racebike so I don't care so much about looks. Just want something reasonably durable.
Thanks guys.
 

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Once again, more good info, FOG. Thanks.
 

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Has anyone here ever tried baking soda and cyanoacrylate (super glue)? It's fast, easy, and cheap. So far from what I can tell it holds up well too. Your technique for applying it may affect your results. You want the plastic to be clean and somewhat roughed up with sandpaper.

You can get enough baking soda to fix your fairings 100 times over for $3. Go to a hobby shop and buy the super thin variety of cyanoacrylate (CA glue for short) for $5. Make sure to get the thin kind as the thicker stuff (most "super glue" sold at hardware stores is too thick) will not soak into the baking soda very well.

-Groove the back side of the crack with a tool of your choice (dremel, die grinder with carbide burr, or cartridge roll, or sanding disk). I find I have to resort to a variety of tools depending on the shape of the pieces being joined.

-Place a strip of masking tape on the other side of the crack to hold the pieces together and to keep baking soda from pouring through the crack.

-Pour baking soda into the crack and smooth it out with your finger so it just fills the crack and doesn't have too much excess. The fairings should be off the bike so you can position the crack horizontally to make it easier to apply baking soda.

-Apply drops of thin CA glue to the baking soda. You will see the baking soda go from powdery white to translucent as it is soaked with CA glue. You will probably also see wisps of vapor as the CA glue instantly hardens.

-Continue down the crack wetting out all the baking soda with the CA glue. Blow away excess baking soda after the whole crack has been glued. Any excess CA glue not in contact with baking soda will not instantly harden -- it will remain liquid for quite some time and you can quickly wipe it away with a paper towel. Be careful because if you touch your finger to the wet CA glue it will probably bond to the plastic. Wear latex gloves to prevent this from happening.

If you're investing in a good quality paint job you will want to repeat this process on the front side of the crack too. The baking soda/CA glue compound is hard and sandable. You can also use the baking soda/CA glue for reattaching broken mounting tabs. I sprinkle some baking soda on the fairing where the tab goes, then press the tab into the baking soda, then squirt some CA glue onto the perimeter of the tab. The CA glue will soak in between the two pieces. Then build up more baking soda/CA glue around the base of the tab if space permits.
 
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quicksparks said:
Has anyone here ever tried baking soda and cyanoacrylate (super glue)? It's fast, easy, and cheap. So far from what I can tell it holds up well too. Your technique for applying it may affect your results. You want the plastic to be clean and somewhat roughed up with sandpaper.

You can get enough baking soda to fix your fairings 100 times over for $3. Go to a hobby shop and buy the super thin variety of cyanoacrylate (CA glue for short) for $5. Make sure to get the thin kind as the thicker stuff (most "super glue" sold at hardware stores is too thick) will not soak into the baking soda very well.

-Groove the back side of the crack with a tool of your choice (dremel, die grinder with carbide burr, or cartridge roll, or sanding disk). I find I have to resort to a variety of tools depending on the shape of the pieces being joined.

-Place a strip of masking tape on the other side of the crack to hold the pieces together and to keep baking soda from pouring through the crack.

-Pour baking soda into the crack and smooth it out with your finger so it just fills the crack and doesn't have too much excess. The fairings should be off the bike so you can position the crack horizontally to make it easier to apply baking soda.

-Apply drops of thin CA glue to the baking soda. You will see the baking soda go from powdery white to translucent as it is soaked with CA glue. You will probably also see wisps of vapor as the CA glue instantly hardens.

-Continue down the crack wetting out all the baking soda with the CA glue. Blow away excess baking soda after the whole crack has been glued. Any excess CA glue not in contact with baking soda will not instantly harden -- it will remain liquid for quite some time and you can quickly wipe it away with a paper towel. Be careful because if you touch your finger to the wet CA glue it will probably bond to the plastic. Wear latex gloves to prevent this from happening.

If you're investing in a good quality paint job you will want to repeat this process on the front side of the crack too. The baking soda/CA glue compound is hard and sandable. You can also use the baking soda/CA glue for reattaching broken mounting tabs. I sprinkle some baking soda on the fairing where the tab goes, then press the tab into the baking soda, then squirt some CA glue onto the perimeter of the tab. The CA glue will soak in between the two pieces. Then build up more baking soda/CA glue around the base of the tab if space permits.
What is this wizardry?
Ive got a few scrap fairings laying around that I gotta try this with. Wonder how it ages.
 

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Is this what Plastex is? Then how do they get the black stuff? Just wondering... doesn't feel like any super glue I've used before.

I bought a kit (on Amazon) several weeks ago and have repaired/fabricated two seriously busted headlight tabs, two upper cowl breaks (at the bottom of the mirror on one side, at the top on the other), a broken slot in the right tail where it slides forward onto the tab on the center/tail light cover (I was able to build this up and make it beefier than stock, which all seem kinda flimsy and I see lots of them broken on these 2nd gen bikes).

I bought a "master kit" which, given my experience so far, I have enough material left to fabricate an entire motorcycle. Stuff goes a LONG way. Given a full 24 hours to cure, it is just as strong, if not stronger, than the original piece. A Dremel is my favorite companion tool. I just love the Fastex...makes me regret all the unobtainium plastic bits that I've thrown away in the past that I could have easily fixed, if I'd only had this stuff at the time.

Tonight's project: refill some gravel-milling on the bottom of a Targa lower fairing.
 

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I'm confused on what I need to do here.
I want to paint my bike, but the lower frame needs some repair to it. It has a hole and a crack in it, but I want to repair this. I just ordered a heat gun, but where do I obtain ABS from? Or should I order the lower fairing and just replace it?
 

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Sitm09 said:
I'm confused on what I need to do here.
I want to paint my bike, but the lower frame needs some repair to it. It has a hole and a crack in it, but I want to repair this. I just ordered a heat gun, but where do I obtain ABS from? Or should I order the lower fairing and just replace it?
You say the "lower frame needs some repair. Did you mean to say "fairing"?
 

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That would be true....fairing. I'll upload pictures of exactly what I'm talking about later when I get home from work.
 

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The front fairing on the bike I bought was in peices I ended up using resin and a weaved fiberglass and used epoxy putty and recarved
 

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That will fail. The chemistry is vastly different to prevent chemical bonding .and a bit of vibration will soon loosen the mechanical one. You will be up for the job again soon.

FOG
 

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Reading this discussion, I've figured out my plastic is ABS. I plan on ordering some ABS welding rods and using a heat gun to melt them down to fill in the gap and along the cracks. Here is the picture of the damage. Should I be doing anything else?
 

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You don't need to do the welding rod thing unless you want to. The Plastex will do the job. STRONG and flexible. Search for it on Amazon or eBay. I got mine on Amazon. Stuff sands nicely and you can fill low spots with it. Easy peazy.
 

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Ok. So going through different forums and such, I have devised a plan to repair the hole and cracks in my fairing. Please poke holes in any thing I have overlooked or not aware of.

For the whole, I plan on purchasing some fiberglass mesh to lay on the bottom of the gap. Using plastex, I will fill the whole, then let it dry and fill the top with plastex as well to even it out. Let it dry completely, then sand it down to match the rest of the fairings.

For the cracks, I have abs welding rods and a heat gun. I think this will be sufficient, and if I feel it needs more, I will add plastex for additional reinforcement.
 

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Wheatchex1 said:
I can definitely say that while it does work, if you don't sand shortly after making the joint it becomes very hard and very hard to sand.
I agree that it does become harder to sand, but not problematic. I find it to be only slightly harder than the OEM fairing material.

Wheatchex1 said:
Also cyanoacrylate glues while strong are very brittle and mechanically join the two parts. Using the ABS glue which has a solvent creates a chemical/molecular bond which should be, when cured, as strong as the orignal material.
This is where I emphatically disagree, as this was one of my main issues in trying out Plastex: it had to be as flexible in our cold weather (cured) as when the weather is hot. I've had a bunch of different glues and epoxy compounds fail on me under extreme temperatures or flexing.
So I put my upper cowl arms through the wringer after they were repaired and well cured, both warm and extremely cold (10F) and they held up to anything I might put them through.

Also, Sitm09, cracks are where the Plastex really excels for quick and easy repairs. Have you checked out their website and instruction video? Worth a look. I've done a lot of stuff that didn't require a repaint or touchup....or wouldn't have if I'd used masking tape in the prep stage <sigh>
 
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