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...Last time I rode on city streets without a lid. It sucked. I felt naked for one thing. The number of bugs, rocks and blowing sand that hit me in the face made me wonder why anyone would ever even consider riding without a lid. ...

Why do people put up such fight over wearing a helmet?.....sean
Believe me, I also wonder the same.

Helmet already saved my life once when I crashed in my EX against the truck that passed the red light. Now if I ride my motorcycle without a helmet, I feel that I am less than naked.
 

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Discussion Starter #103
Well there doesn't seem to be a lot of controversy on this subject. I never know until I try. :grin2:
Looks like the final tally is my no.
2 for yes.
And a couple undecideds?

And I can't dispute the yes's, because they are both from another country than me. If I were in their country I may very well agree with them. But can't say for sure. I didn't think about that part of the equation before bringing up the subject.

My goal is to find a new subject that will parallel the controversy of an oil thread. :grin2:
I have my work cut out for me. :surprise:

Just an FYI:
I always have, and always will wear a helmet even in states where they are not required. My response sticks as a hard NO. I don't think my government has any right what so ever to require me to wear a helmet. :wink2:
 

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The last helmet/no-helmet discussion I got involved in resulted in me being banned from that forum but, what the heck...no, I don't wear one...almost ever...I own about five of them, everything from vintage with bubble shield to a 3/4 to a full modular, but I can't stand wearing them and don't unless it's raining (and I brought one) or it's <50deg outside, but I typically don't ride at all below 50deg so kinda moot really.

Okay, nice to have met you all, have a nice life...!!!
 

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Just saw this thread and love the idea of it.

As for the helmet idea, I'm in agreeance with bpe. The government, or other people in general have no right to tell others what they are required to do in said people's self interest unless it endangers the collective. Motorcycle riders without helmets do nothing to danger the public, and only pose a risk to the person riding. I feel the same in regards to seat belt laws where there is less than 2 people in the vehicle.

For me, this does not change for universal healthcare, as we are still paying for the services with our tax dollars.

That being said, I do wear my helmet religiously now a days. When I started riding I loved my helmet, and then caught the no helmet bug. My family and I rode Harley's and the wind in my hair was euphoric, and it was nice for talking at stoplights. Now I'm the only one who rides and I am on the EX. I hate riding new bikes without the safety of a helmet. I won't go back to the non helmet days, more out of respect for my girlfriends wishes than anything else.
 

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Discussion Starter #107
@z00t3ch
While I may not agree with all you do, I will defend your right to do it. :wink2:
 

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Discussion Starter #110
the clutch is a device to disconnect the drive from the engine to the gearbox that ultimately drives the rear wheel.
Disconnect synonymous with disengage.
The clutch is in fact doing it's job when it is engaged. Rolling that bad boy down the road. Other wise the clutch wouldn't be called a clutch, it would be called an unclutch.
Of coarse this is just my opinion. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #111
hi. I said either definition was correct just a matter of interpretation. we would describe something as operating when it was being used IE when the lever was pulled. like the front brake.
Sorry, you can't have it both ways. If it is engaged in one position, then it would be disengaged in the other position.
The clutch and the brake work in the opposite fashion. To obtain the friction with the clutch (engage) you release the lever. To obtain friction with the brake (engage) you pull the lever.
Any shop manual I've ever read uses the same definition I'm describing.
 

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Sorry, you can't have it both ways. If it is engaged in one position, then it would be disengaged in the other position.
The clutch and the brake work in the opposite fashion. To obtain the friction with the clutch (engage) you release the lever. To obtain friction with the brake (engage) you pull the lever.
Any shop manual I've ever read uses the same definition I'm describing.
hi. I'm not being pragmatic here. but to operate something you have to do something to it. to alter it's state from a rest position. therefore operating it. you operate the brake by pulling the lever. so you operate the clutch by doing the same thing. like many other things. you operate the petcock by turning it in either the on or off position. and this goes back centuries. to windmills and other machinery. crude clutch mechanisms were invented to drive something. like mill stones the wind/water turbine were free to revolve but left the grinding stones stationary until you pulled a lever to make them move. this remained right up the steam age where you made the (train) move by pulling a lever down.
in fact the very first automobiles used the same principal where you pulled the hand lever to make it go.
of course this is impractical and was reversed using springs to keep the clutch in the drive position. the lever then used to disconnect the clutch rather than use the lever to connect or operate it. it is just terminology used in a different way. although both definitions are in fact correct.
 

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Discussion Starter #113
Sorry, not buying into it. You can't say the clutch is engaged when the lever is released, and then also say the clutch is engaged when the lever is pulled to the bar. That would just mean the clutch is always engaged.
It's not terminology either. Some say petcock and some say fuel tap, fine. But you don't yes when you mean no. You don't say go when you mean stop.
 

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The language is consistent in all motorcycle manuals, etc. It needs to be consistent otherwise you get into confusion like we had in the other thread.

52311

52313

52312

52314
 

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. That would just mean the clutch is always engaged.
exactly !!.
how many times has someone wrote on the forum "my bike has been stood for a while and now clutch is sticking and it won't disengage" everyone knows what they mean. yes. it means the plates are sticking not the plates are slipping quote from the UK booklet on how to pass your driving test it clearly states the pupil while on the practical portion of the test must show proficiency and smooth operation of the Clutch. Brakes. and while changing gears.
it is just a colloquialism like many others. same meaning different way of describing it.
us that are non US speakers mostly use American terms so information can be easily understood. personally I could never understand why a fuel tap is called a pet cock it's illogical.
one assumes broken down it stands for pet (meaning petrol) only you guys call it Gasoline and cock meaning tap but to us a cock is either a male bird or the dangly bit between your legs.
 

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Discussion Starter #116
 

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Sooo... If my understand is right, when you engage the clutch lever, it disengages the clutch plates... jeezzz... englis is confusing... (Spanish my mother language)
 

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I suppose you're technically right - when you are actively operating (ie pulling) the clutch lever, the clutch itself is disengaged. However, I've never heard anyone talk about what's going on at the lever; most often we talk about what is happening directly at the clutch. So, instead of saying "the clutch lever is pulled" or something like that, it is more clear to say "the clutch is disengaged." In my engineering brain, it's always better to directly describe the status of a mechanism (clutch disengaged/engaged) than to make someone infer the status based on input conditions (lever pulled/not pulled).
 

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I suppose you're technically right - when you are actively operating (ie pulling) the clutch lever, the clutch itself is disengaged. However, I've never heard anyone talk about what's going on at the lever; most often we talk about what is happening directly at the clutch. So, instead of saying "the clutch lever is pulled" or something like that, it is more clear to say "the clutch is disengaged." In my engineering brain, it's always better to directly describe the status of a mechanism (clutch disengaged/engaged) than to make someone infer the status based on input conditions (lever pulled/not pulled).
it is just a matter of terminology and the mechanics of operation. whether something is operated by manual input or not.
anything automatic has no manual input so this has no bearing on operation because it is in a constant fluid state and only changes when other external forces act upon it that are not manually inputted.

Manual by definition means human or operator input to change it's status or mode of operation, by manually changing the status of a object you are operating it manually or engaging the device. by changing it's status from what it was before you did something.
in the case of say a brake it is at rest in the off position and by manual operation is made to be in a on position.
the clutch is the opposite as it is on in the rest position and off when manually operated.

it is just as valid describing this operation as engaging the the clutch in order to select a gear as it is to describe the clutch as permanently engaged and disengaged by manual input to select a gear.

same thing just a different way to describe it. nothing more.
 

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wow I can't believe it. we now have to teach third grade english . in/out ,engage.disengage, who can keep up?
 
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