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wow I can't believe it. we now have to teach third grade english . in/out ,engage.disengage, who can keep up?
anyone above 3rd grade I suppose what ever that is. and I also suppose it depends on whether you are describing American English. or Queens English as written in the OED.
 

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Sooo disengage the clutch by engaging the clutch lever?
 

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@yorkie I understand your POV linguistically, but not technically. In my experience and teachings, a clutch is said to be engaged when it is transferring power from its input to its output and disengaged when it is not transferring power, regardless of which is its at-rest state and which is its actuated state. I can think of examples of a clutch that is engaged in its at-rest state, like that on a motorcycle, and a clutch that is disengaged in its at-rest state, like the clutch (sorta) that drives the blades on a riding lawnmower. Talking about a motorcycle specificially, when you actuate the clutch (by pulling the lever), it transitions from its engaged to its disengaged state. I would not say that is valid to describe pulling the clutch lever as engaging the clutch because it is causing the clutch to no longer transmit power.
 

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Discussion Starter · #125 ·
^ That's what I thought.
And this is not a case of terminology.
I thought we had this settled. 😵
 

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Somewhere, in some movie, probably a space science fiction, there was a commander making his rounds. Opening the door to a small storage rooom, he found two crew members going at it hot and heavy. Demanding an explanation, the male half replied, "But sir, we're engaged!" To which the Commander ordered: "Well, disengage and get back to your stations!"
 

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^ That's what I thought.
And this is not a case of terminology.
I thought we had this settled. 😵
by what means majority voting or general consensus. :) :love:
@yorkie I understand your POV linguistically, but not technically. In my experience and teachings, a clutch is said to be engaged when it is transferring power from its input to its output and disengaged when it is not transferring power, regardless of which is its at-rest state and which is its actuated state. I can think of examples of a clutch that is engaged in its at-rest state, like that on a motorcycle, and a clutch that is disengaged in its at-rest state, like the clutch (sorta) that drives the blades on a riding lawnmower. Talking about a motorcycle specificially, when you actuate the clutch (by pulling the lever), it transitions from its engaged to its disengaged state. I would not say that is valid to describe pulling the clutch lever as engaging the clutch because it is causing the clutch to no longer transmit power.
technically this is correct. but not literally in the same sense. to use the lever on a bike or pedal in a car is to operate it. or change it's function from driving to non driving. we say to operate it is to engage it. yes it sounds strange to you guys but there it is.
all I would say is when the OP that asked the original question that started this discussion described the issue no one seemed to understand him. but I did as I recognised the terminology he was using.
you guys use your definition I will use mine so call it settled if you want but before I go read this.

Clutch control refers to the act of controlling the speed of a vehicle with a manual transmission by partially engaging the clutch plate, using the clutch pedal instead of the accelerator pedal. The purpose of a clutch is in part to allow such control; in particular, a clutch provides transfer of torque between shafts spinning at different speeds. In the extreme, clutch control is used in performance driving, such …
 

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Guess we're gonna have to agree to disagree. Sorry for dragging it up again @bpe 😶

On an unrelated but relevant (to the eastern seaboard anyways) topic: covering a bike to keep it dry is good, I would imagine (point). I've also heard people say that a cover will blow a bike over in high winds (counterpoint). Yes/no?
 

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depends on the strength of the wind. in most sub gale conditions it should be fine. worth noting on this point that HGV's in our country at least draw back the curtains on empty trailers in windy conditions to avoid tip overs. as the wind passes straight through the trailer.
also remember bikes are supposed to be waterproof even the seat. as long as it is allowed to dry out why bother covering it. however salty sea air is more corrosive than rain water.
 

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Discussion Starter · #130 ·

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wow I can't believe it. we now have to teach third grade english . in/out ,engage.disengage, who can keep up?
Hey FOG, don't get mad at me. Since I learn english being a grown up man, this lessons are very useful for me. Thanks every one. (y)
 

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Not mad Jorge, just amazed. as an engineer I had to be understood precisely about things, and took it for granted that my instructions would be understood correctly .
now I read where the simple operation of a clutch is lost on a number of folk.
To me mechanics is a language itself, and know no geographic boundaries. I have worked in forgone countries where I did not speak the local language ,but never had a problem with communicating technical info.

FOG
 

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Discussion Starter · #133 · (Edited)
Oil pipe tweaking

You guys make way too much of a big deal to just simply take the pipes off. How can "tweaking" them to gain better access possibly be considered a better alternative? ( Or even an alternative at all)
 

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You guys make way too much of a big deal to just simply take the pipes off. How can "tweaking" them to gain better access possibly be considered a better alternative? ( Or even an alternative at all)
it shouldn't be but not everyone is at the same level on maintenance.. taking the pipes off is no big deal unless you don't know how to or perhaps your trying to do them with the only worn 10mm spanner in your box. then it's one more job you have to do properly. if the pipes are tight (as you know they are) and without knowing it you bend one end so it no longer seals so loses oil pressure in the pipe. then close it up. only to find at the next adjustment you have burned. pitted. worn out. cam lobes or followers. ( I wonder how many cam issues are down to this) then tweaking the pipes to get your spanner on make perfect sense.
 

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Discussion Starter · #135 ·
It doesn't take a master mechanic to remove the pipes. 1 screw pop, pop. Wham bam thankya ma'am.
 

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we will have to just disagree on this one.:cool: if you know. it's easy. but if you don't. not so much.
my B.I.L worked in the city with no parking so he bought a little bike to commute. a Honda 90. after a while he wanted something faster so upgraded to a Yamaha 125 2 weeks after getting it he seized the engine.
first question I asked. did you put oil in the fuel this is a 2 stroke. nope he had no idea there was a difference and that two strokes required oil in the fuel. no matter how simple something is someone will get it wrong.
 

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It takes ZERO seconds to not remove them. Easy Peasy Lemon Squeezy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #138 ·
@yorkie
It appears you have some back up. Which is good, because you're gonna need it. This is not over. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #139 ·
if the pipes are tight (as you know they are)
Here is what I know is tight. The water pipes. Anyone that doesn't have the aptitude to R&R the oil pipes, would also not have the aptitude to R&R the water pipes. Water pipes using the same principle and R&R procedure, only much more difficult. So if you cant do that, you would need someone else to do it for you anyway.
It takes ZERO seconds to not remove them. Easy Peasy Lemon Squeezy.
And how long do you figure it takes to R&R the oil pipes.

Plop plop fizz fizz
oh what a relief it is




Huuummmm
 

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Here is what I know is tight. The water pipes. Anyone that doesn't have the aptitude to R&R the oil pipes, would also not have the aptitude to R&R the water pipes. Water pipes using the same principle and R&R procedure, only much more difficult. So if you cant do that, you would need someone else to do it for you anyway.
And how long do you figure it takes to R&R the oil pipes.
...
I dunno... may be I'm just lazy. If I don't "MUST" do it, probably I'll not doit.
 
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