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Looks like your doing a good job Sean,:wink2:
Going to be nice when you finish it.
 

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Discussion Starter #122
Looks like your doing a good job Sean,:wink2:
Going to be nice when you finish it.
Well Thanks Jonh.........been a little bit since I've seen you on EX500.



Today was gorgeous out. Shorts and sandals weather. I didn't get much done though. Got out my new digital torque wrench and torqued some fasteners down. Managed the front fork triple clamps, both upper and lower. The lower engine mount and one of the 2 swing arm pinch bolts. I have to pull the chain to reach the left side bolt so that just wasn't in the cards today.



On the parts front, I received my new to me MOSFET regulator/rectifier and the proper connectors to wire it up. Checked the stator wires on my project bike's replacement motor and they were in horrible shape. I touched the wires and the insulation just crumbled off. The wires underneath were green as well. Looks like I'm gonna have to do some extra wiring then. I'll have to strip the wiring back to clean copper before I wire in an extension so it will reach the R/R once it's installed. still not sure if I'll return it to the stock location or simply install it somewhere else. Either way, the leads on the stator now are already too short for either.



Also got a new braided stainless steel rear brake line so, all the hydraulic lines are now new. Also, ordered a carbon dash surround and Ti fasteners from RSR Moto. Not my last order to them I'm sure. Those are still on the way. Still left in the que to order are rebuild kits for the clutch and brake master cylinders. I think I might just replace the rear one as they're fairly cheap new from various Ducati suppliers around the web. Down to just a battery after that, with regard to parts that I need to order. As far as major jobs left after that...really just the paint.



There is one other modification that I'm going to have to make and that is to the speedometer drive. As I went with the front wheel off a 1999 bike, it uses a 25mm axle in it's donor. To fit it to my bike, I sleeved down the bearing and spacer to accept a 20mm axle. That meant I also had to change the speedometer drive as the OEM one for my bike was a 17mm axle and was too small. I got a 20mm ID drive but found out that it is 5mm too thick and offsets the wheel to the right. That means the rotors will not align with the caliper centers making the whole conversion that much more complicated.



The answer is, either buy a 25mm ID speedo drive and swap out the sleeve and drive parts, or just take the one I have to a machinist and turn 5mm off of it. I can do that, but it will have to be much later, like after I get the bike off of my bike bench. Something I don't see happening for at least another couple of months............more later....sean
 

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Discussion Starter #123
Got out to my garage today but honestly, it was too damned chilly for me to get much done. Did I mention I'm wuss when it comes to cold weather? :grin2:
All you folks from anywhere North of Georgia will absolutely laugh at me for saying this but anything under around 50 degrees is getting where I don't want to even be outside. Right now, the weather report says it's 55. Maybe in the sun it is, but in my garage it's more like 34. I can see my breath. IOW, too cold for me to do much.



Anyway, all I got done is install the Ti rear rotor bolts. Torqued all but 2 because I have to raise the rear end up and rotate the wheel to be able to reach them. Beyond that, I wrapped up the old forks and stuffed them in my enclosed trailer.



Besides the fact that they're in need of a complete rebuild, and all the suspension fluid has leaked out of them, the bolt holes for the fender are a mess. Here are a few pics of that:

The hole on the left doesn't look too bad at first but the one on the right....that's supposed to be round. It's also supposed to have threads in it.


The left hole in the 1st picture above. Should have threads but doesn't.




And the one on the right.....it's just a mess. That would require welding, then drill and tap to fix correctly. Might as well just find a new fork tube. I mean, for the amount of effort it will take to repair this one correctly. The other hole, the one that is still round, I could just drill that one out and install a proper threaded insert. A Timesert or something similar. I'll forgo the helicoil tough, as I'd not trust that to fail over the long haul.


Got the wiring harness inside the house where it's warm and I can work comfortably. Gonna get the wiring for the MOSFET regulator done this weekend. More later, when I have actual progress pics to share.....sean
 

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Discussion Starter #124
Got the MOSFET wiring done last weekend. Having it in a warm house to work on made a huge difference. I'm pretty sure I have it right, but am seeing a difference between the schematic and the actual wire harness. Cleaned up the harness while I was at it. I just used some cleaning solution and an old sock. When I finished, the sock was completely black from all the general nastiness that coated it.



Yesterday was phenomenal, weather wise. Got out to the garage fairly early and got started on torquing all the fasteners that I didn't get the last time out. Finished up with both the swing arm pivot and the rear brake disc. Once I got the chain back on and adjusted the tension on it, I torqued the rear axle nuts. All that's left on the rear wheel itself is the sprocket nuts.



The floating rear brake still needs work, but I have a new rear master cylinder on the way. Already have a new braided steel line for it. Still gotta get new Ti banjo bolts before I mount up the rest of the parts. Slow progress I know. Still need brake pads too.



Also ordered a rebuild kit for my clutch master. Already have a new braided line for that and some gold alloy banjo bolts too. Once those parts arrive, I can put the clutch hydraulics together. Just going to reuse the aftermarket slave cylinder that came with the bike. One of the few things aside from the frame, swing arm and rear wheel being reused from original.



Installed a new digital volt meter yesterday. It seems one of the "lightening" holes in the front subframe was exactly the right size for it. The only issue is, it sits right under the instrument binnacle. Not a problem as I'll still be able to see the voltage reading. The problem will be the USBs. One is completely obscured and there is no way a charging cord can be plugged in.



I may fabricate a bracket later if I can find a spot that makes sense and doesn't look like garbage when an aftermarket part is installed. It will suffice for now. Installed the cleaned up new to me OEM exhaust yesterday as well. The original that came on the bike was smashed almost flat on the pipe from the horizontal cylinder. Looked like crap too. So, I ordered a new to me header in very good condition from an internet site called "Wounded Duc" It was in far better shape and wasn't smashed. It cleaned up really good too. Looks almost new on the bike.



I'd picked up some up swept mid pipes to mount some after market Scorpion pipes to. I did a test fit yesterday and did not like the result at all. I have some bolt on type carbon Micron's that I may yet end up using. As I'd need to fabricate a flange for them, and weld that to the up swept pipes, I'm not sure that is the route I want to take. I may save them both for future projects and just go with something else entirely. Fast By Ferracci sells a nice carbon set up but it's pretty pricey. Like $800 pricey. I'd rather spend that on a new Bitubo or Öhlins shock.



I think that's about it for now, aside from pics. Not much to take pics of though. I'll revisit this post with pics if I manage to take any........sean
 

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this is what I was referring to within our wiring harness conversations....in 2015 I found this taped somewhere on the harness, can't remember where exactly it was, but harness original, never tampered with. This WAS done at the factory.

A loose, migrant terminal? No wire was attached nor even close by. Weird.
 

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Discussion Starter #126
A loose, migrant terminal? No wire was attached nor even close by. Weird.
Huh, I don't know what to think there. I've not seen anything like that in my harness, nor any harness that I've ever had apart. Not in my garage and not really in my professional life either.


I've seen something similar once, a really long time ago...maybe lat 1990s or so. It was not in a harness but was being used by a guy to build a harness. It didn't look exactly like that, was shaped more like a flattened old school key. Like one you'd find from the early 20th century or later 19th century.


Kinda like this, but flat and without the tang on the long part of the key. Just the loop and the end and the long part. Only flat. Like sheet metal thin flat. Prolly 1.5" long. Guy would run the wire through a semi rigid heat shrink tube and use the tool to pull wires through once things got a bit tighter. He'd only use it on the last 6-8 wires.



Makes me wonder if that is a part of one of those tools. Never seen another one since then....but then again, never seen anyone else build wire harnesses in the field. Normally done at an assembly plant.



Did I mention I worked in experimental heavy equipment at one time? That would probably have been the time frame when I saw that. That's my 2 cent on the subject....and even then, it's mostly just a guess......sean
 

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this is what I was referring to within our wiring harness conversations....in 2015 I found this taped somewhere on the harness, can't remember where exactly it was, but harness original, never tampered with. This WAS done at the factory.

A loose, migrant terminal? No wire was attached nor even close by. Weird.
I work in a sensor factory, and I can confirm without fear of being wrong that what you found is part of the roll of terminals that is discarded after an automatic machine crimp the terminal to the cable.

Most likely, the harness was assembled right next to the machine that installed the terminals and that part just "flew over there." I leave reference image:

 

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Discussion Starter #129
Yeah, that looks like a more reasonable explanation. The tool I wrote about is significantly larger than that tiny piece of metal.


I tried to find a picture of it on the web today but honestly, it could have been, and most likely was something created for that specific job.



The technician I was working with was a contractor who was installing an experimental foam penetrator on the end of a boom equipped fire truck. The idea being that the truck could be driven up to a burning aircraft and the penetrator could puncture the aircraft skin and flood it with fire fighting foam.



This was to be done robotically and the project involved this tech installing some of the servos and the wiring harness for them. This was probably 1995...kinda late in the year. I left that assignment for my current place of employment so I never got to see how that little project turned out....sean
 

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Discussion Starter #130
Basically, I got zero done for the last two weeks. Call it whatever you want, but mostly life just got in the way.



I managed to get out to the garage for a couple of days this weekend and got a little bit done. Mostly the rear brake got quite a bit done to it on the hydraulic side. Almost ready to put fluid in and bleed the air. Same for the clutch...though once again, I have to remove some parts as I neglected to install the choke lever when I installed the master cylinder.



I took it off yesterday with the intent of rectifying that situation but when I took the lever off, the piston popped the rubber boot out from under the retaining ring. So, the whole affair had to come back off so I could refit the boot...which, BTW, can't be done without removing the retaining ring. Once I got things sorted out, I used my arbor press to reseat the retaining ring.



And, after installing the master cylinder AND the switch pod and bar end, realized I once again, utterly FAILED at installing the choke. FFS. I get to go through all of that process once again today. However, I also need to pick up some safety wire so I can make a custom "clamp" for the feed hose from the reservoir to the rear master cylinder.



Hopefully, as I'm off today, I'll manage to get all that done. I mean, with the trip to the store to get some safety wire. Also, I've been researching the part number of the rebuild kit for my front brake master. It is a PS15 REC master cylinder and seemingly no one carries the seal kit for it. I see plenty of them advertised but none are actually correct. I believe I've found the right one from a company out of Washington called OPP or Optimum Performance Products.



I've ordered from them previously and they stock pretty much all the Brembo replacement parts one could ask for, and at reasonable prices too. Part of my days mission is to call them and confirm that the part they show will fit my front master and then get it ordered. More sometime later this week.....maybe with pics this time too.........sean
 

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I just finished rebuilding a bunch of vintage Brembo stuff.
Two fronts, two rears, and a flock of calipers. I hate Brembo


I had a LRD, the next bigger one, looks much like your PS15.
The bore measures 15.75mm, so it's a 16mm... right?
No one has parts for a 16mm... only 15mm. I hate Brembo

After MUCH searching, sorry don't tell me there is NO Brembo LRD master in 16mm I GOT ONE!, seems BMW offered a OEM Brembo master that measures 15.87mm(I think it was front).
No one has a kit. WHEEEeeeeee
I hate Brembo
Call Steve at Bevel Heaven... no problem he says. That's a 15mm LRD he says. I'll send you the kit.
I hate Brembo
I get the kit... it's friggin 5/8"
I hate Brembo


I got the parts to rebuild the other masters from Dodge wheel cylinders... but I did have to spend a couple of hours making thin washers to ram in end to hold the thing together... that I gave up on on the last one and counterbored a slot for a spring clip LIKE NORMAL PEOPLE DO.
I hate Brembo.
... but if you're looking for Brembo parts I HIGHLY recommend Steve @ Bevel Heaven
 

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Discussion Starter #132
I just finished rebuilding a bunch of vintage Brembo stuff.
Two fronts, two rears, and a flock of calipers. I hate Brembo


I had a LRD, the next bigger one, looks much like your PS15.
The bore measures 15.75mm, so it's a 16mm... right?
No one has parts for a 16mm... only 15mm. I hate Brembo

Call Steve at Bevel Heaven... no problem he says. That's a 15mm LRD he says. I'll send you the kit.
I hate Brembo
I get the kit... it's friggin 5/8"
I hate Brembo


.. but if you're looking for Brembo parts I HIGHLY recommend Steve @ Bevel Heaven
He's local....about 20-25 minutes away....and I may do just that. I did my research over on the Ducati.MS forum and found the information regarding the 15.8mm-5/8 bore master cylinder rebuild kit being referred to as a 15mm kit from Brembo so I was aware of all that already.



The problem I have is, all the kit's listed as being for a PS15 or as 15mm show a two seal replacement piston and no end boot. Mine looks exactly like the 13mm kit shown on almost every site, including Bevel Heaven only it is 5/8" bore. It has a single seal piston with the ports in it rather than a double sealed one, and it has a boot that is retained by a pressed in metal ring.



Seems as no one sells a kit that resembles that description. I may just end up going with a superbike master cylinder w/remote reservoir if I have to. Was trying to keep it period correct for the most part, or at least, look period correct. The SBK master was an upgrade that a few people did back then so I don't feel too bad doing it.....but I'd much rather just fix the one I have.



Did manage to get out to the garage and get a few things done before the sinus infection I've been fighting for the last week or so finally kicked my a$$ enough that I decided a nap was in order. Got the choke installed and even poured in some fresh ATE DOT 4 into the clutch system. Started to bleed it when my head finally hurt so bad I called it a day.



Ended up doing a bit of eBay research for some more parts. Found a place out of China that sells foot control ends that screw on rather than crimp on. This is good as my foot brake lever pin is mostly destroyed. I like the idea of just buying a threaded pin with the pad and bolting it on, rather than buying an entire new lever.



Found some rear sets sold out of the UK also.....not horribly priced either, at sub $300 prices. Then, well....then I stumbled onto some Dymag magnesium wheels sold out of Japan. Filed those away in the maybe one day file. The price of them shipped is over 3/4 the price I paid for the bike to begin with.



About all for now as there was not really any further progress made this weekend. Never made it to the shop for safety wire, nor for more stainless steel screws....however, I did find the screws I was after.....in my tool box where I'd left them weeks ago. I couldn't remember buying them but there they were.



I'll spare everyone the "up next" part because I've been so inconsistent with getting out to the garage and getting stuff done. That and it seems as though, everytime I think I'm ready for the next step, I have to take a step back and address some other stuff that I either hadn't thought of, or just forgot about.



As this project involved a complete strip down of the bike, right down to individual systems that had to be rebuilt from the ground up, there are a bunch of things to consider before jumping in and just putting stuff together.



What I can say for certain is, once I have all the hydraulics sorted out, front brake aside, I can at least then stop the bike when I have to roll it around the garage should I decide to take it down off my bike bench. That said, once the hydraulics are done, it's time to get started on electrical. That much is certain.....sean
 

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Discussion Starter #133
Minor update

I did a bunch of research on the master cylinder, and 15mm seal kits. No one has one that resembles what I have. So, I've already ordered a new to me 16mm master cylinder from a 2009 Monster 696 from eBay.



Kicker....it was just $30 delivered to my door. It is also a "coffin style" master and uses the exact same levers as the OEM 1993 part. Win-win. Newer style internals with a very similar external and all for roughly the price of a seal kit.



Hopefully it's in as good shape as it appears in the pics. If so, I'll run some new DOT4 through it and see how goes. Otherwise, I'll be ordering a seal kit for it. At least I know I can find one for this master.



Also ordered an inline fuel shut off valve from Aircraft Spruce, along with a couple of other things. My Wez nuts for the exhaust finally came in too, so I'll get that properly mounted soon. Hopeful that I'll have real progress to report after this weekend.....sean
 

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Discussion Starter #134
Mini-update on the 696 Master

The new to me master cylinder from eBay arrived today. I'm amazed at how good condition the part is in. Even the residual DOT4 in the reservoir was clean as you like.



I installed it on the bars with the OEM clamp that came on my bike. Took a few pics to show the differences between the OEM and the 696 master cylinders:



The 696 master up top, OEM 900SS below.






Same position of the two master cylinders. The inside of the 696 master is clearly spotless and clean. There is a distinct size difference between the two, as the 696 unit is much wider. It is actually the same height and length so visibly fits with the period controls:

All for now. I did a minor bit of work on the rear brake lever as the pin was ground down from either a drop or being drug through a corner. It was also bent so my first guess is it was from being dropped.



I'd read about an option to buy a pin on eBay that simply screwed on. The OEM is peen/riveted on. The pin has a soft flange that was mushroomed out to fill a recess in the lever. Mine was very loose, likely from attempts to repair the damage.



I drilled out the end of the pin and removed it. Then installed a new pin with a stainless steel, flat head screw. It fit perfectly, even though it was from an aftermarket set of controls that I had sitting in a box I got with my 996.



I'll post pics of that part of the project a bit later as I have a bit of work to do on the rear brake system. More later...........sean
 

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Discussion Starter #135
I was searching around on eBay for some new to me foot controls like I mentioned in a previous post. While doing so, I discovered the product below:




My original rear sets are not in horrible shape now that they've been cleaned up a bit. I'd still rather they were anodized black.....and I may attempt some home anodizing to make them that. However, that's not really important at the moment. What is, is the brake lever.



As I've written about it being somewhat mangled, I drilled out the peened end of the pin last weekend. I happened to have a partial set of SATO rear sets off my 996 that came in the stash of extra parts when I bought it. The brake lever wouldn't work without the complete set so I removed the pin from it, as it screws on, like those pictured above.



Installed, that looks like this:



Which, while not bad looking, I'm going to pull it all back apart this weekend and replace the pin with one the ones in the first pic. Those look more like the OEM pin with the pad on it so that's what I'll go with.



I ordered 2 of them thinking from the description that they were individually sold. Turns out, they're sold as a pair so I now have two pairs. No biggie, I'll keep them in my spares stash....I'm sure I'll end up using them on future projects.



More later.........sean
 

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Discussion Starter #136 (Edited)
Spent a little time in the garage today. It was lovely out, nice and warm....at least in the front of my garage it was. Wind was blowing pretty good...the palm trees around my 'hood were swaying pretty good.



Anyway, I got a little bit done, but not anywhere close to what I needed to get done. My mother in law is coming over and staying the night tomorrow so you can guess what I spent the majority of my day doing.



Anyway, I did think to take some pics this time. Last post I wrote about the new pins for the brake/shift levers that I got on eBay. They're made in China and seemed like a great idea. They are, but in this case, a bit flawed in execution.



I'll start with the lever itself and the original pin removal.

Here is the removed pin, drilled out from the end where it goes through the brake lever:






As can be seen here, it is bent, and the tip ground down at an angle suggesting both drop and slide damage. The hollowed out end is where it was peened to sit in the recess below:






The new pin seemed like a great idea. Just drill out the old one, screw on the new one.....it should be that simple. The problem with the execution of this product is that there is no shoulder to sit against the lever. Once you screw the stainless steel screw in, it draws it up against the rubber toe pad.






In order for this to work, I needed a way to prevent the pin from being drawn through the hole in the lever. After a bit of thought, I chucked the pin up in a drill and used a file to file a groove in the pin. Deep enough for the pin to accept an "e" ring retainer (circlip to some)



This gave the pin a "shoulder" to sit against the lever and stop the pin from being pulled through the hole, against the rubber toe pad.



Here's what it looks like installed on the lever:






And installed on the bike:



Also, in my last order to Aircraft Spruce, I got some .32 annealed stainless steel locking wire. Safety wire to some. Aviation grade stuff too. As I still have a pair of safety wire pliers, I got to work with them. I decided to dispense with the little wire clamps for the reservoir supply hose to the rear master cylinder. Honestly, most of them suck, as they don't apply much in the way of pressure on the hose once its over the hose barb. I used a length of safety wire instead:



Also, in this pic you can see the tidy Lite Speed alloy banjo bolts I picked up from OPP Racing.



Finally, a picture of the clutch hydraulics at the slave cylinder end. Also with Lite Speed alloy banjo bolt and bleeder.




Got started on the body work today too. I ordered new sides and solo tail from Air Tech back last summer. Thought I'd have them painted by now too. I only have the upper to do any real work on as the tank is done and awaiting final prime before paint.



I pulled the upper down out of the rafters today and removed the grill and windscreen. The windscreen is a "double bubble" type screen but it isn't from the normal "double bubble" company. Nope. I looked at the manufacturer logo and had no clue who it was. Glaeser Aeroplast....made in Germany. Nice piece of kit.....still makes me wonder how it ended up on the pile I bought.

http://www.gp500.com/




Either way, I got to removing the nasty thick paint, using a scribe as I did on the tank and old side fairings. I took it down to a crack that I'd noticed in the paint but not on the back side of the "blade" where the wind screen and mirrors mount. Turns out, the factory glass is cracked but not broken all the way through. As soon as I get time, I'll "V" out the crack and take the gel coat down so I can bond some new glass in with some marine grade epoxy resin.



More later, hopefully with pics.........sean
 

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Discussion Starter #137
Been a little bit since I posted an update. Mostly because, not much has transpired. Really. I got started on the little remaining body work before I install all the mounting hardware and test fit the body before I primer it all. (the AIr Tech stuff came in white gel coat but it needs primer white before paint) I retained the stock upper piece which in retrospect, maybe should have just been replaced. It is in no better shape than any of the other stuff.

Shagged out knackered, would be the closest term I can cull from my vocabulary and really, only our UK membership contingent could fully appreciate that description. I spent the majority of a weekend chipping the old nasty paint off to get it down to the OEM paint level. Once there I found some cracks that didn't show when the dense layers of paint were covering them. These I glassed in using marine grade epoxy resin. That stuff is amazing. Difficult to sand through though. When cured, the repair is substantially stiffer than the actual OEM glass.

Once that was all cured and sanded back, I applied some feather fill body putty which is where I left off. I let that stuff cure but only have checked that it is cured properly. I have not been able to get back out and sand yet. While I was repairing cracks, I also filled the extra holes that were drilled to fit aftermarket mirrors. I used the OEM fairing stay to determine the proper holes. I filled the rest, and in fact, one of the proper holes because it was so hogged out, and had cracks emanating from it.

I also ended up having to chip off the built up paint on the metal grill mesh. Bodgers couldn't even take the time to remove it (just 2 screws hold it in place) before slathering paint all over it. Needless to say, that took a while as well. Once I got all the crap paint off, I ran a wire wheel over it to remove the rust that was under the paint. Gave it a good coat of satin black so it looks like it did originally....well, it might be a bit glossier but at least it's the proper color again.

I'd offer pics but body work is completely boring and the few I did manage to take.....well.....boring, like I said. I might post them here later on.............sean
 

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Discussion Starter #138 (Edited)
Thought I'd drop in and add a couple of pics today. First up is a shot of one of the upper "blades" that surround the lower portion of the wind screen:


This picture illustrates a few things. I've prepped the glass by grinding back the surface beyond the gel coat for application of glass and epoxy resin. In doing so, I had to strip off the old paint job and get it down to the OEM paint.

On both sides of the picture that triple thick layer of paint is obvious. On the left there is a ring of it around the forward bolt hole for the mirror. Just below is the ridge created when the paint was chipped away to get down to the OEM stuff.

On the right side of the picture is a graduated level similar to the left side where the OEM paint level is starkly lower than the triple thick layer that was on top.

The second bolt hole for the mirror is just butchered. It's wallowed out and mostly a mess. This is the main reason for grinding back on this particular side.

The opposing side (above) has a crack running through it, just behind a third hole that was drilled for the aftermarket mirrors that were installed when I got the bike. Those all must now be filled.



Next up, the metal mesh grill that resides under the head light cut out:


This is about halfway scraped clean of the awful red paint. Evidence that the bike was not stripped down when it was painted. It wasn't prepped well either as there is plenty of evidence of that on other parts that got coated in filth. Obvious that much of that filth is debris from sanding, wet sanding and polishing/buffing of the "finish" with parts still on the bike.

Once I finally managed to chip the remaining paint off this small piece, I took a wire wheel to it to get rid of the rust and any remaining paint cling ons. Then I shot it with a satin black wheel paint. Wheel paint claims to be tougher and more fuel/solvent resistant than a regular lacquer. Once that set up, I shot a matte clear over it. Still looks a bit too glossy for my tastes but much better than it did in clogged up red:
 

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Discussion Starter #139
A few more pics. I sanded out the body filler (dyna lite) today and then shot a thin coat of primer for a guide coat. I haven't sanded on the guide coat yet but I can see where I still have a few low spots to fix before I move to a fillable primer. So, first up the "blades" I posted about in my last post. Here is the side with the crack that posted 2nd last time:

Like the 1st "blade I posted, this had an extra hole drilled in it for the after market mirrors. It has been filled with glass and marine grade epoxy resin along with the crack that was pictured in the last post. The repair itself has been sanded down already and the filler applied. Here it is after sanding and a guide coat applied:

Low spots are evident, even without sanding. Once sanded, they'll be even more evident and I'll apply some more filler to get it all leveled for paint.

The 1st "blade" I posted last time was suffering from a bunged up mirror bolt hole as well as an extra hole that was drilled to accept the after market mirrors. Here it is after the glass repair, initial sanding back of the repair and application of filler:

Now that the major repair stuff is taken care of, I also filled some amateur decal removal work that was bestowed on the upper fairing. The OEM Ducati decal that graces the spot between the head lamp and the wind screen had been ground off for what ever reason and the glass was left with worm trail like gouges in it. Here it is after the filler has been applied:

Note the grill openings at the bottom of the fairing. That's where the metal mesh was removed from in the previous post.

Here are the same two spots after sanding and guide coat application:

The gel coat is pretty rough as evidenced by the scratch marks seen in the guide coat. Some of these I created using 80 grit paper to remove the OEM paint down to the gel coat. The rest were already there courtesy of the amateur prep job this was given prior to the garbage paint job that "graced" the bike when I got it...


All for now.....sean
 

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Discussion Starter #140
Been busy with other things of late, and not had much chance to get time in on the PSS. Did manage to prime the upper nearly fully. It needs to get block sanded still, then cleaned, and primed again before a sealer coat goes on. It's getting closer but still not there.

I fabbed up the brackets that get glassed into the tail section...or at least, prototypes of them. Now that I know what they'll look like and how they fit, I'm going to fab the versions I intend to install on the fiberglass tail. To that end, I got some sheet aluminum to fab them from and a metal brake so I can make more precise bends than with my bench vise and a pair of pliers.

The other distraction of late is, we bought a Cricut machine. If you're unfamiliar, it's a plot cutter for all manner of crafts. My wife has wanted one for some time, but they're not cheap. Not the one she wanted anyway. Then, out of the blue, she found one on Amazon for under $350 so we got it.

I've been practicing with different vinyls reproducing "Ducati" logos in different scripts and sizes. Finally got it where I'm happy with the work coming out of it. Up next, the old Cagiva era Ducati logo with the "elefant" That and I agreed to buy us a heat press so we can make T-shirts, ball caps and mugs with the different media available for use with the Cricut.

As it also cuts seat vinyls, and I have a bunch of those from recovering seats I might see what I can do to make a custom seat cover. IE, one with a design rather than plain one color stuff.

The last thing I'm studying and attempting to employ is the use of hydrographics on the belt covers for the PSS. I was following a guy over on Ducati MS who used it to do the covers on his project bike. They came out looking pretty awesome. So much so, I asked where he'd bought the carbon covers as I'd never seen ones like them. He cut out the covers and after applying the hydrographics, he cut his own clear covers and bolted them in place. Ducati Custom Streetfighter red
 
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