Ex-500.com - The home of the Kawasaki EX500 / Ninja 500R banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,
Does anyone here use Purolator (Purolator One) oil filters? They've got a convex internal surface, apparently this is a fairly recent change, so I was wondering if they still fit properly? Searching the forums didn't bring up anything new. Thank you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
Hey guys,
Does anyone here use Purolator (Purolator One) oil filters? They've got a convex internal surface, apparently this is a fairly recent change, so I was wondering if they still fit properly? Searching the forums didn't bring up anything new. Thank you!
They still have to seal using the thick rubber O ring at the base of the filter, so I don't see why they wouldn't still work for you. All vehicles use a flat metal surface for the filter to seal against using that large rubber O ring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Not sure how new any convex or concave changes are; Triumph RAT was talking about this in 2015. Personally, I always go with either Purolator or Wix on various vehicles, as both seem to fare the best in the multitude of YouTube videos where people are cutting them apart. I have also been using some SuperTech (WalMart brand) as some of those same videos seem to indicate that the SuperTech may be a re-branded Wix. On the EX I just go with the Wix (51358) because its black...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,559 Posts
Purolator is my number one brand with Wix close behind.
To the point though, I've been using Purolator on my EX exclusively for about 8 years now, still do to this day. I recall the external finish changed a couple years back, seems that went along with an internal change as well. Neither have affected fitment.
FYI, PL14612 is the same size as the standard EX500 filter. If you'd like a bike more filter media working for you, along with a very small amount of extra oil capacity, PL14610 is the filter to get. It's what I've been using all this time and it does fit behind the lower fairing. It's the standard Honda automotive filter size, the majority of their cars take it. That also leaves you with an additional filter option, just roll into a Honda car dealership and grab a Honda filter.
 
  • Like
Reactions: kensei

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
FYI, PL14612 is the same size as the standard EX500 filter...
Huh, 14612 is also the filter for my NA 1.6 Miata. I think I recall looking for a Purolator number for the EX once, but wasn't able to find one at the time. Interestingly, to me anyway, is that Wix specifies different numbers for those two with 51356 for the Miata and 51358 for the EX. I wonder if that is just an incremental difference, similar to the 14610/14612...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
I seem to recall that 14612 was also the filter for my Passat 1.8T. I no longer have that car but still have some of the filters on the shelf in the garage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,117 Posts
The following is a synopsis of online research on oil filters and oil, done during long northern winter months while looking longingly at the bike in the garage awaiting the spring thaw....

I've seen various videos where they cut filters apart and examine them on youtube. There appear to be big differences in quality and construction between models examined. Probably more so than differences in oil brands, which have to conform to a rating system oil filters don't have to. Check online reviews before purchasing and youtube for info. Weight and price are sometimes indicators of quality as better filters will have good mechanical backflow prevention and better filter elements. As I recall Purolator One was one of the highly-rated brands.

I almost always used 10W-40 synthetic and a quality oil filter and generally run about 12K km/7500 mi between changes and have never had a bike with oil consumption or other engine issues over 12 years of riding. I have however had stiffer/notchier shifting issues when using 5W-40, probably due to the thinner base oil 5W-40 uses compared to 10W-40. Since cold weather starting is a non-issue on a motorcycle you're probably better off using it than 5W-40 due to the thicker base oil.

An M2 rating simply means the oil has no friction modifiers that will adversely affect a wet clutch.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top