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Moderating: Fair & Just
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Remove the valve cover.

Remove the oil pipe hold down bolts. Remove the oil pipes. Remove the spark plugs if they are still in place.


Remove the 2 access caps on the flywheel cover.


Using a 14mm socket on the flywheel bolt, rotate the engine clockwise to line up the "C" mark on the flywheel to the indicator mark.


Break the center bolt on the CCT loose. Do not remove the bolt at this time. Remove the 2 smaller mounting bolts and remove the CCT.



Remove the cam holder caps.
Note: When reinstalling the caps, they all need to go back in the same order and are directional specific. To make this easier they are all alphabetically marked, and have arrows to show direction. When viewing from behind the engine looking forward, they go alphabetically from top to bottom, left to right, like reading a book. The arrows point towards the front of the bike.


Make sure all 16 of the guide pins are accounted for and in place.


Pull the exhaust camshaft out. Support the cam chain with something before removing the intake camshaft. Remove the intake camshaft.


This would be a good opportunity to measure the cam chain, to check for excessive stretch. Measuring 20 links of the chain, specs are : new 127-127.4mm. With a service limit of 128.9mm.



This is the orientation of the cams. Exhaust cam is at the top of the pic. Note which side is left and right.


If you are installing the sprockets on the camshafts, the sprockets are identical. On the exhaust cam a bolt needs to feed through the hole with the ( E) mark. On the intake cam a bolt needs to feed through the hole with the ( I) mark. These bolts are torqued to 11ft.lbs., and loctite needs to be applied.


The timing marks on the sprockets need to face towards the left of the bike.

Apply engine oil to the areas of the camshafts that are clamped under the hold down caps. (If you are installing brand new, never been used cams, you will want to use molybdenum disulfide grease on these areas).

Install the intake camshaft. When doing this, be sure to pull on this side of the chain to take out any slack.


The IN timing marks must line up with the valve cover mating surface, with no slack in the rear part of the chain.


Place the exhaust camshaft in position to where it leaves 24 chain link pins between the sprocket punch marks. This will put the EX timing marks in the correct position once the camshaft is bolted down. Right now its off a bit because of the #1 cylinder cam lobe not letting the camshaft drop all the way down.

Starting with the intake camshaft, place the hold down caps in place. Be sure put them back in the same order, and direction. Put the cam chain guide in place at this point also.

Torque the cap bolts on the intake cam down. Using this tightening sequence. They just need to be torqued snug to 104in.lbs. (aprox 8.5ft.lbs)
Do the same for the exhaust camshaft.


When done the intake timing mark should be level with the valve cover mating surface on the right.


And the exhaust timing mark should be level with the valve cover mating surface on the left. And the "C" mark on the flywheel should still be on its mark.



Take the CCT, remove the center bolt and depress this lever while pushing in the part that contacts the chain.



Reinstall the CCT, just finger tightening the mounting bolts. The rod will probably fall out doing this. Just replace it inside the spring. Push the spring in, you should hear the CCT adjusting. Replace the center cap bolt and snug tighten to 43in.lbs. Snug tighten the mounting bolts to 95in.lbs.

Apply engine oil to the cam lobes. Turn the engine over by hand a few times at the flywheel bolt (clockwise). Make sure everything is looking right and your timing marks are lining up with the flywheel "C" mark. Adjust the valves and your done.
 
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Fast Old Guy
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before you button it up ,Why not degree them, not much more work and worth a lot, I have never checked a used engine in for fresh rings & bearings that the cams were not rtarded at least 4 or 5 degrees of crank rotation. all the pics up above show perfect alignment ,but I doubt it, I believe the poster set them perfect for the pictures.
Anyway I posted a how to in the appropriate section.

FOG
 

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Moderating: Fair & Just
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Message from the poster:
The pics are not manipulated in any way. Just maybe a few "suspicious" camera angles needed to get to what I am trying to show.
 

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Fast Old Guy
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20,022 Posts
I only said that because it's a rare thing for the timing marks to come out spot on, thats what led me to pursue the degrading bit.
You must have a good Timing chain

FOG
 

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Moderating: Fair & Just
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well there not spot on. When one timing mark is spot on, the other one rides a few millimeters high.
 
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