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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So this is a weird one for me. I know a little bit about how transmissions work but I'm not sure what would cause this.

In 5th or 6th gear (possibly others, haven't tried) on the highway, regular foot pressure just resting on the shift lever and the lever will move down a bit as if I were going for a shift. The bike doesn't actually shift (I have constant throttle going, I'm not doing a clutchless shift in this situation). All I'm doing is resting my foot on the lever and from that pressure alone the lever is moving downward until it stops. Doesn't happen all the time but it's getting quite common when I put regular pressure from my toe onto the top of the shifter.

It's... disconcerting? I have no other issues with shifting, I can do a shift with or without the clutch lever depressed as normal. But I'm not understanding what mechanism might be failing that's allowing this to happen. I've had the bike for over a decade now, haven't ridden it in 5 years or so so I just did a fresh tuneup on a bunch of things, but don't recall this ever happening before (unless I did a clutchless shift by cutting throttle).

Any ideas? Is there another part that's on the way out that I should be concerned about here?
 

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The only time your foot should be on the shift pedal is when you want to shift.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The only time your foot should be on the shift pedal is when you want to shift.
This is a mechanically related question. If I'm preparing to downshift on the highway and slight pressure is moving my shifter before I need it to move, that's a problem, and it's one I don't recall ever having before while riding more than 20,000 miles on the bike.
 

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Agreed, that's a weird one.

But before anyone suggests you check for medications interactions, let's take a look at some of the shift mechanism.

It's not a direct shifter to shift shaft type, instead it uses two "universal joints" to connect your foot to the rest of the shift mechanism.
When worn, I have seen some sloppy shifting problems at that point. You can check by moving
the pedal and see how much slack is there before the shift shaft turns.

You will also notice that the internal gear change mechanism (see parts fiche online) includes 3 different springs,
any one of those could cause problems with shifting, I guess. Don't know if you want to
pull the cover and look at those now, or wait and monitor the situation, your choice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Agreed, that's a weird one.

But before anyone suggests you check for medications interactions, let's take a look at some of the shift mechanism.

It's not a direct shifter to shift shaft type, instead it uses two "universal joints" to connect your foot to the rest of the shift mechanism.
When worn, I have seen some sloppy shifting problems at that point. You can check by moving
the pedal and see how much slack is there before the shift shaft turns.

You will also notice that the internal gear change mechanism (see parts fiche online) includes 3 different springs,
any one of those could cause problems with shifting, I guess. Don't know if you want to
pull the cover and look at those now, or wait and monitor the situation, your choice.
I'd say I have about 1mm of lateral travel (left right), the bolt is not loose, and about 2mm of up/down travel before encountering actual shifting resistance.

I'm OK with pulling things I guess I just need to find out what I'm pulling.

Thanks for the confirmation that this isn't exactly normal, I wasn't sure if I was misremembering what "normal" was from years ago.
 

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an internal shift shaft spring failed on my 900ss Ducati in 2016, memory serves upshifting became difficult while downshifting was effortless. Flywheel needed to be pulled to inspect/find and replace it. Cost? About $6. @PEX500 I'd suggest a looksee inside.

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Normal. If you hold steady throttle and tap the shifter it will shift. Not wise to do on a down shift as the resulting change in gear will both speed the engine up and cause the bike to unsettle slightly. You’d want to be prepared for the sudden deceleration.

If you match the RPM you can down shift sans clutch all the way down to 1st gear. Not recommended but it is entirely within possibility to do easily.

Same with up shifting. A slight roll off of throttle to unload the driveline will allow a clutch less up shift.

I’d not put any amount of weight on the shifter until you intend to shift because, as I’ve already written it can and will shift without use of the clutch.

Steady throttle and steady weight will shift the transmission to the next gear. Seen it and done it both intentionally and unintentionally. It matters not one bit whether or not there is linkage involved or if the lever is directly on the shift shaft.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
In 20,000 miles of riding this bike I have never downshifted without cutting the throttle. This situation is not causing a gear shift. I am not modifying throttle in any way and the bike is not shifting as a result of the lever movement.
 

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I've had the bike for over a decade now, haven't ridden it in 5 years or so so
Any ideas?
My suggestion - take it or leave it - give yourself and the bike a chance to reacquaint with each other. If your missing gear(s) up or down becasue of the 2mm vertical play that is another story.
Vertical / Horizontal play - what does that tell you?
 

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hi, both @ducatiman and @Apriliarider have it just about sussed. behind the case where the gear shaft exits the gearbox is a strong figure of 8 spring (think it's called a butterfly spring) that holds the shaft in fixed place, if it gets weak (fatigued) or is broken it allows some movement in the rotational axis of the shaft although not enough to limit gear changing.
it just makes the lever feel loose. I have the same issue on the gen 1 but have learned to live with it.
in fact in a way prefer it that way. by holding the lever slightly up when accelerating (but not enough to make it change up) then dipping the throttle it makes quick (clutch-less) up shifts easy. also down shifting but I tend to use the clutch for these for the reason @Apriliarider stated, all other times I keep my foot away from the lever.

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
My suggestion - take it or leave it - give yourself and the bike a chance to reacquaint with each other. If your missing gear(s) up or down becasue of the 2mm vertical play that is another story.
Vertical / Horizontal play - what does that tell you?
That's just the play in the ball joint, the action of the lever itself is spongey in the situation I described.

hi, both @ducatiman and @Apriliarider have it just about sussed. behind the case where the gear shaft exits the gearbox is a strong figure of 8 spring (think it's called a butterfly spring) that holds the shaft in fixed place, if it gets weak (fatigued) or is broken it allows some movement in the rotational axis of the shaft although not enough to limit gear changing.
it just makes the lever feel loose. I have the same issue on the gen 1 but have learned to live with it.
in fact in a way prefer it that way. by holding the lever slightly up when accelerating (but not enough to make it change up) then dipping the throttle it makes quick (clutch-less) up shifts easy. also down shifting but I tend to use the clutch for these for the reason @Apriliarider stated, all other times I keep my foot away from the lever.

View attachment 54993
Yeah I'm gonna have to take a look at the springs as I'm just not a fan of what it's doing.
 

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@PEX500 provide year and mileage please?
 
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trying to ascertain whether the subject spring would/could suffer simple wear, but those with even more mileage are (seemingly) ok.
 

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I wouldn't mind seeing a pic of that '05.;)
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I wouldn't mind seeing a pic of that '05.;)
Nothing recent with it put back together, but here it is after putting the front end back together after replacing fork seals and steering stem bearings:

Tire Wheel Fuel tank Automotive fuel system Vehicle


My improvised "bearing press" using a 5-ton bearing/hub puller and the old bearings to pull on the new one on the steering stem, braced with wood and a thick piece of metal (since my wood blocks kept splitting in half from the force)
Bicycle part Bicycle chain Rim Wood Nickel
 

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Nice bearing press. (y)
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I thought it was ingenious when I figured it out but I'm sure it's a common way to press on bearings at home. I just knew that pounding on a PVC pipe with a hammer was doing absolutely nothing, and after breaking a couple wooden blocks I could see why. I'm guessing this might be easier on other bikes.

Regardless, it's like riding a whole new bike and having to relearn how a bike is actually supposed to handle now that the countersteering is actually smooth and the bars don't plant themselves in the center on the notched races.
 
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