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Discussion Starter #21
Back where I left off on day 2, my brother and I had just finished squaring up the wheels, tires and brakes plus a replacement chain. Next is when I drilled out the cap on my locked tank so I could swap over the original gas cap as well as a quickie fuel petcock rebuild. I went over that part a few posts back but this is when that actually happened.

I can't remember if this is when I also did a PAIR delete or if I managed that on day 3, oh well, it happened eventually. I used a crappy set of homegrown set of block off plates I got a long time ago and taped over the hole in the front of the airbox. A friend works at a machine shop, I asked if he'd be willing to throw together a few plates if I gave him an old PAIR cap as a template for the plate and he said sure. Those are ready now and once I pick them up, I'll use one of those sets instead. I do thoroughly recommend Toddlamp's high quality kit and I've purchased two before and will probably buy another one in the near future, but these will be good to have on hand for such projects as these, plus they're free.

Anyhow, at this point on day 2, it was late afternoon and the bike was ready for an actual test ride. Warmed it up and my brother was the first to rip it up and down the long driveway. He said front brakes were really soft and the forks even softer, both of which I later confirmed. Rear brake is splendid though, both of us were able to readily lock up the rear, which is great fun when doing it sideways on a tire that is worthless and a bike you don't care about.

I put my helmet on and took it for a rip down the street. I live out in the boondocks, so few neighbors, no one to care about unregistered vehicles and no stop signs. Speed limit is slow down and don't hit pedestrians and cyclists.

Now, mind you, when we swapped out the front and rear wheels/tires, my brother noted that the rear rim got whacked at some point and was a bit out of round. The front even more so. That is because I had forgotten these wheels both came off my "It was dirty so I decided to clean it" thread years ago where I did a full engine out cleaning on a friends bike which was followed shortly by replacing the front end after a gnarly hit which folded the forks back into the radiator. My test ride quickly reminded me why I had replaced them. I leaned over and looked at the front wheel when doing 30 and the wheel was about as straight as a Ruffles potato chip. Out of round and out of true in every direction. Speeds above 35 resulted in some serious shake. Rear wheel was only marginally better.
So, that's why both brake rotors were bent.

I got a half mile down the street and turned around because the rims were so bad I was worried one would fail. A high speed run would have to wait another day.

But, it was now running reasonably well and shifting through at least 4 of the gears quite smoothly. All the oil cleared out of the combustion chambers and was burning cleanly, no more smoke. Still hadn't acquired a battery yet, those are a bit harder to find for free still working, so I had to temporarily rob the one out of the daily.

Some important changes and updates to come on day 3. Also finally some photos again.
 

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Nice write up, where do you get the large o-rings that go on the end of the fuel tubes after you "de-rack" the carbs?
Good thing come, to those who wait and persevere. Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Nice write up, where do you get the large o-rings that go on the end of the fuel tubes after you "de-rack" the carbs?
Good thing come, to those who wait and persevere. Cheers
I bought a 10 dollar universal metric o-ring kit from Harbor Freight years ago and grab whatever one fits out of that. A very useful kit that is, it comes with a ton of o-rings and many have worked on the EX in a variety of applications, including the popular cylinder head coolant tubes.
 
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I bought a 10 dollar universal metric o-ring kit from Harbor Freight years ago and grab whatever one fits out of that. A very useful kit that is, it comes with a ton of o-rings and many have worked on the EX in a variety of applications, including the popular cylinder head coolant tubes.
I bought some custom tig welded aluminum fuel tubes for my v four bikes, they came with the fancy viton o-rings. Used them in my 93 which had a leak, I have a back up set in my tool box just in case for my other v-four.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Got busy this weekend and never had the chance to update.

Day 3 arrived and I did some small puttering around on the bike. I pulled both of the forks to swap out the fluid for something a bit thicker. I had most of a bottle of 10 weight fork oil in the cabinet so I used that. Forks weren't leaking but I was worried fresh fluid would cause a leak, a concern which I would later discover was well warranted.

From there, I was feeling lazy so I continued to put off the valve adjustment. Instead, I went about installing the funky fitting aftermarket fiberglass upper fairing and an old lower fairing. The upper fit okay for being what it was, but it was very crooked relative to the fuel tank due to a prior accident which had bent the fairing stay. I spent a little bit of time hammering on the fairing stay an ultimately ended up no better off than I started, so I called it good enough and left it at that. Both mirrors can bolt up and that's the important part. The fairing doesn't have mounting tabs for the headlight so the headlight I half-assed ziptied the headlamp to the fairing stay. The light points generally forward, I think.

Lower fairing is factory so it wasn't a question of the mounting points lining up but cutting it to fit around the 2-1 exhaust system. Don't worry, I'm not chopping up a good fairing. This thing had already had holes cut for frame sliders which mount through the front engine mount bolt holes (frame sliders I have and will install soon), a chunk was broken off and both back corners had been melted by exhaust. This is a rough fairing to begin with so I don't feel bad hacking into it. I did some chopping and got it close to bolting up in the back but not quite. Needs maybe another half hour of cutting and fitting to have it fully mounted, but I'm not in a hurry to finish that, so it was hanging by the front bolts for a few days so I could get a picture with all the fairings mounted and they are all coincidentally shades of red, including the tank, except the lower which is dark grey.

The last thing I did that day was do a redneck tire swap. I found a Dunlop Q3 120/70 in the used pile at the moto shop next to my brother's shop what was only 4 years old with decent tread, so I snagged that, another free score. Mind you, I do not have any of the correct tools for changing a tire myself, but that didn't stop me from trying. It did stop me from being able to remove the ancient hard tire from the original rim. Not to worry, I had a tire-less gen2 rim up in storage. It was the first wheel I had on my daily when I did the gen2 suspension sway years ago. I had painted it red, which went well, but when I started spraying clear on it (this is all rattle can paint), the red paint hadn't fully cured and the clear immediately started to pull up and crack the red paint. I wiped off my disaster, which was on about a 5th of the wheel surface, waited a few days and did my best to hide it with more red paint. It looked okay from a distance, but up close it was obviously a butchered paint job. I rand that until the fast wearing Diablo Rosso II wore out and traded that for another I rim I didn't botch the paint job on.
So, I grab this conveniently paint matched red wheel to the rest of the red body work on this bike and go about forcing this tire on with nothing more than 1 big flathead screwdriver and my bodyweight. I didn't do anything nice to the paint on the rim, but I did eventually get the tire on. 65psi got both beads to seat and I was in business. No balancing or anything yet, just install and go, leaving the old weights where they are. If the front end bounces and shakes, I'll re-balance the wheel.

Here's a picture of the result at the end of the day. Not half bad really, all things considered.

 

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Discussion Starter #26
So a few days go by, I find myself bored and figure it's high time to adjust the valves.

I know from experience that the long run time before the engine will hold idle without choke is due to far out of spec valves, specifically tight exhaust valves. So I drain the coolant, which was surprisingly still very coolant like, no funny business in the cooling system. Coolant tube screws came out with ease thanks to an electric mini impact. Coolant tubes themselves were mildly stuck as the ancient o-rings had become solid. Took some wiggling to keep from mangling the tubes with pliers and they eventually came out. Some marginal corrosion on the outside, less than I expected to be honest, inside was perfect, zero corrosion. A good sign.

The valve cover came off and out with the usual irritation of forcing the valve cover out without disconnecting the throttle cables. I was rewarded with a perfect top end, no corrosion on anything from sitting, cam lobes perfect with no pitting, no discoloration of the metal surfaces due to burnt oil from lack of oil changes even though I'm sure it didn't get enough of those.

I don't typically check valve clearances before setting them back to where I like them, aside from simply seeing if they are exactly as I want, but I was curious this time so I checked all of them before. All of the intakes were tight but not outside of allowed spec. Three of the four were .005" with one actually slightly out of spec at a loose .004" but none would have caused adverse running conditions. Still, set them to .006".
Exhausts were a different story. Loosest exhaust valve I found was on the left side at .004", the other left side valve at .002" and the right side was zero tolerance, rocker had no wiggle to it so I didn't even bother trying to slip a feeler gauge on either valve. Found my running problems. Set all exhaust valves to .009".

Bolted everything back together using the original valve cover gasket making sure to RTV the half moons. Oh, and I didn't forget the oil tubes for the cams this time, something I do far more often than somebody with my experience ought to. Filled up the cooling system, no leaks.

Fire it up and it immediately sounds healthier. Within 30 seconds I cut the choke and it's holding idle. Low idle naturally as it isn't warmed up yet, but still without choke, something not possible before after such a short time. Light roll on the throttle gives a confidence inspiring result, no hesitation or misfires. Fully warmed it up this time until the fan cycled on and off, now I knew the thermostat was working as is the fan.

Unfortunately, I was losing daylight and the headlight on this thing is really more for show and making myself seen, rather useless for me to see with. There's always the next day to test ride.
 

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Now that is some stick-to-it-ive-ness! Awesome work there Saabnut bringing that EX back, gonna be so satisfying taking that next ride. Great demo on taking your time and not giving up when re-habbing every system on the bike. This is inspiration to me when i want to throw in the towel on hard to fix stuff, thanks for posting
 
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Discussion Starter #28
Test ride came the a day or two later, but not after swapping out the rear wheel for one which is straight with an okay tire on it. I gotta say, this thing scoots now! Took it up to 80mph without issue, though I didn't want to hold it there for long due to the age of the rear tire. It's in visibly good condition, but it's still 12 years and I don't trust motorcycle tires that old. Still, I got the bike leaned over a decent bit around a few curves and it stuck it, thanks largely to a much newer front tire. The lefty Jardine exhaust is louder than I'd like on a daily rider but does sound good. Engine has long since stopped smoking, both out the tailpipe and off the outside after burning off all the old crud. The used swapped in front brake pads started off with very little bite, but bedded in some and were working much better after a few miles and some hard stops.

After a 4 mile test ride, I park it to do an inspection, see if anything is leaking. No coolant or engine oil leaks, but to my lack of surprise, one of the forks sprung a leak. Sections of my road are in rough shape so the forks got a good workout. Combine that with fresh fluid I just installed with old seals and it's a perfect recipe for leaking forks. Not a big deal, I'll take care of it later. Fuel tank still only had a half gallon of fuel, so I rode down to the closest gas station 3 miles away to put in another 2 gallons and finally get off of reserve. Got the bike leaned over a bit more on that ride and it handled well, but I kept it under 60 and didn't get too aggressive with the corners as I still am running a relatively old tire.

After I got home, I looped around my oval shaped driveway practicing locking up the rear wheel and sliding sideways to a stop. If I got an old tire I don't care about, might as well have some fun with it :cool:
 
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