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So I started out with a beat up 07 Ex500 I bought for $600, ran well and had a clean title. Problem was that I didn't know how to ride a motorcycle, so the seller rode it to my house where I learned on my own. He removed the blinkers, gauges, headlight, fairings and gave it to me in a box. He replaced the headlight with a cheap ebay one. So this is where I started. But it ran fairly decent. DSC00002.JPG

I replaced the handlebars with clip ons, some bar end mirrors.

Next I started removing the factory air box, adjusting the carburetors and running open carbs. I know thats bad for out CV carbs but I haven't had many problems with that yet. Mainly what I ran into was having to shim the needle and adjust the fuel to air mixture via the screw below the carb. Its hidden underneath this metal plug that you have to drill out. After adjusting it, I've had very good results.

A couple years down the road I used body filler on the dents in the tank, and did a crappy spray paint job. Then a couple drops later I replaced the levers with oem ones. Then my exhaust rusted out, so I chopped off the flanges and rewelded a couple of pipes. So far nothing in terms of aesthetics except the clip ons and bar ends.

Then until a month ago I started learning body work on my own and painted my car, used the same paint and techniques and applied it to my bike with amazing results. Chopped the rear seat, replaced the factory brake light with an LED one from Autozone. In order to do so, you have to solder in a diode so that current from the signal wire enters the system and the other positive wont travel back down the stream if that makes sense. And for the running wire you need to solder in a ressistor so that it is dim. So when the signal is applied there is a full 12v to the LED for full brightness, and when not applied there is slightly less for a dimmed light.

Then I cut the rear subframe below the seat for a cleaner look, I weight 135lbs and have had no flex or bends from this. IMG_9497.JPG

ELECTRONICS:
Where did I put all of them? For 2 years I was just riding with all of them dangling about behind the carburetor, crude, yes. Effective, yes.
If you have a smaller battery you can fit ALL of the electronics below the stock seat and the bottom level of the seat's frame. So if you make a flat pan using sheet metal and mount it below the seat you can stuff everything in there neatly IF you have a smaller battery.

Got a set of Metzler Sportech M5 without knowing they were low treadwear tires. You can fit 150/60/17 in the rear with no issues. 110 in the front. Picked up the set nearly new for $50. I wouldn't go more than 150 though, I hear you start running into pinching which is where to rim is significantly smaller in terms of width than the tire and the tire does some weird bending.

I recommend removing the brake calipers prior to removing wheels

To remove the rear you put bike on a stand, then using a 17mm wrench on one side and a 24mm or a channel lock, or adjustable wrench on the other, you loosen the bolts and pull out the axle.

For the front you jack the front from the forks, then using a smaller allen head to loosen the bolts on the bottom, then use a 12mm allen to loosen the axle and remove.
Then I took them to a shop to get them mounted and balanced for $40 each including disposal.
IMG_0266.PNG IMG_0267.PNG IMG_0269.PNG IMG_0270.PNG
Lowered the front forks by an inch and increased preload in the rear. Also cut off the excess metal that used to hold the battery in place, didnt cut the part where it connects the two mounting points for the rear shock though.

VACCUUM LINES:
Theyre just out and about, no issues

COOLANT SYSTEM:
As mentioned in another thread our radiator cap is the same as a Ford Ranger's Part number 7516 at Autozone for 9.99 plus tax.

My thermo switch had gone bad from coolant spewing out from the bad cap, so I just hardwired a switch. If you unplug the switch you can use some connectors to plug into both of those ends, and a switch between the two. Use this same method to test if you have a bad fan or switch after checking fuses.

Also replaced the overflow tank with a glass jar because of aesthetics
IMG_0264.PNG IMG_0265.PNG IMG_0271.PNG
Still waiting on some aftermarket levers and velocity stacks.
 

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I'd be reluctant to throw that thing into a turn...obvious lack of exhaust ground clearance quite concerning. I guess OP is showcasing his talents to mod, dedicated to creating a "poser" rather than an actual rider. Man, them pipes are hangin' low and splayed way outward....dangerous. Welp...your bike to do as you like.
 

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So I started out with a beat up 07 Ex500 I bought for $600, ran well and had a clean title. Problem was that I didn't know how to ride a motorcycle, so the seller rode it to my house where I learned on my own. He removed the blinkers, gauges, headlight, fairings and gave it to me in a box. He replaced the headlight with a cheap ebay one. So this is where I started. But it ran fairly decent. View attachment 51449

I replaced the handlebars with clip ons, some bar end mirrors.

Next I started removing the factory air box, adjusting the carburetors and running open carbs. I know thats bad for out CV carbs but I haven't had many problems with that yet. Mainly what I ran into was having to shim the needle and adjust the fuel to air mixture via the screw below the carb. Its hidden underneath this metal plug that you have to drill out. After adjusting it, I've had very good results.

A couple years down the road I used body filler on the dents in the tank, and did a crappy spray paint job. Then a couple drops later I replaced the levers with oem ones. Then my exhaust rusted out, so I chopped off the flanges and rewelded a couple of pipes. So far nothing in terms of aesthetics except the clip ons and bar ends.

Then until a month ago I started learning body work on my own and painted my car, used the same paint and techniques and applied it to my bike with amazing results. Chopped the rear seat, replaced the factory brake light with an LED one from Autozone. In order to do so, you have to solder in a diode so that current from the signal wire enters the system and the other positive wont travel back down the stream if that makes sense. And for the running wire you need to solder in a ressistor so that it is dim. So when the signal is applied there is a full 12v to the LED for full brightness, and when not applied there is slightly less for a dimmed light.

Then I cut the rear subframe below the seat for a cleaner look, I weight 135lbs and have had no flex or bends from this. View attachment 51450

ELECTRONICS:
Where did I put all of them? For 2 years I was just riding with all of them dangling about behind the carburetor, crude, yes. Effective, yes.
If you have a smaller battery you can fit ALL of the electronics below the stock seat and the bottom level of the seat's frame. So if you make a flat pan using sheet metal and mount it below the seat you can stuff everything in there neatly IF you have a smaller battery.

Got a set of Metzler Sportech M5 without knowing they were low treadwear tires. You can fit 150/60/17 in the rear with no issues. 110 in the front. Picked up the set nearly new for $50. I wouldn't go more than 150 though, I hear you start running into pinching which is where to rim is significantly smaller in terms of width than the tire and the tire does some weird bending.

I recommend removing the brake calipers prior to removing wheels

To remove the rear you put bike on a stand, then using a 17mm wrench on one side and a 24mm or a channel lock, or adjustable wrench on the other, you loosen the bolts and pull out the axle.

For the front you jack the front from the forks, then using a smaller allen head to loosen the bolts on the bottom, then use a 12mm allen to loosen the axle and remove.
Then I took them to a shop to get them mounted and balanced for $40 each including disposal.
View attachment 51453 View attachment 51454 View attachment 51456 View attachment 51457
Lowered the front forks by an inch and increased preload in the rear. Also cut off the excess metal that used to hold the battery in place, didnt cut the part where it connects the two mounting points for the rear shock though.

VACCUUM LINES:
Theyre just out and about, no issues

COOLANT SYSTEM:
As mentioned in another thread our radiator cap is the same as a Ford Ranger's Part number 7516 at Autozone for 9.99 plus tax.

My thermo switch had gone bad from coolant spewing out from the bad cap, so I just hardwired a switch. If you unplug the switch you can use some connectors to plug into both of those ends, and a switch between the two. Use this same method to test if you have a bad fan or switch after checking fuses.

Also replaced the overflow tank with a glass jar because of aesthetics
View attachment 51451 View attachment 51452 View attachment 51458
Still waiting on some aftermarket levers and velocity stacks.
I have an 89 ninja im trying to change the air box is there anyway to get more air flow? What exactly did you do?
 

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in his initial post, the OP stated he removed airbox and ran "open carbs", claiming "very good results". CV carbs and airbox are designed to work in conjunction with one another. I'd challenge him to rival the performance of a Fog modded, stock exhaust/airbox, well setup EX, doesn't even know what he's missing.
 

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Also replaced the overflow tank with a glass jar because of aesthetics

A thing of beauty is a joy for ever:
Its loveliness increases; it will never
Pass...

Enjoy every ride!!
 
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