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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last month I rode out to Colorado--from Florida!--on the old ex500. While way up in the rockies an interesting thing happened: the rear brake stopped working. Eventually I realized if I pumped it twice, it worked. I saw no leaks, so I'm thinking the trouble is I just didn't bleed it well and the problem didn't show up until I was a really high elevations(?) I think this in part because once I got back down to sea level the rear brake started working again as it used to--not great, but a lot better than it did in Colorado.

Anyway, unless someone points out a problem I'm not seeing, I'm going to rebuild the rear caliper and bleed the brakes well. I have a couple of questions.

My rear brake line--a galfer--looks a little rough. The plastic coating is discolored and has a small tear or nick on one end. The braided steel beneath the plastic looks okay though. Should I replace it?

Second question. To judge from the curves of the brake line ends, I THINK I must have installed it upside down when I put it in (years ago now). If I keep the line, I'd like to install it right side up. But I need new crush washers. What size crush washers does the rear line need?

Thanks!
 

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Goes without saying it but I will anyways: If you are looking at it and thinking it's a bit rough, Yes ,change the brakeline .
Since you're going to go over the brakes, be extra careful bleeding them.
My physics may be wrong but I think it's possible that a tiny bubble at sea level EXPANDED at higher altitudes...or the questionable rear brakeline let some air in without a leak that's visible on a bike ridden so far as you did..dust and grime, rain and wind.
 

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My physics may be wrong but I think it's possible that a tiny bubble at sea level EXPANDED at higher altitudes
absolutely correct. (Boyles law.) and the banjo washers (crush washers) are the same size anywhere on the bike. 15mm OD/ 10mm ID. in an emergency you can reuse them at least once. by annealing them. (worth knowing).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks so much to you both. I will examine the line closely, probably play it safe and get a new one. (and maybe I should get a new front one while i'm at it, as it has 92K miles on it). I had heard the plastic covering was only to keep the braided steel from scraping up the swing arm (which I don't care about) but I don't know if that's true.
 

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Thanks so much to you both. I will examine the line closely, probably play it safe and get a new one. (and maybe I should get a new front one while i'm at it, as it has 92K miles on it). I had heard the plastic covering was only to keep the braided steel from scraping up the swing arm (which I don't care about) but I don't know if that's true.
your welcome. there used to be an instruction that flexible brake parts were changed periodically due to rubber degradation not sure if this still applies although inside the braid is usually still rubber. the coating on the outside is as far as I know to stop the braid being rubbed away exposing the core rather than what it may scrape against.
suppose the rule "if looks rough it must be time to change it" applies still.
 
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