Ex-500.com - The home of the Kawasaki EX500 / Ninja 500R banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,421 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Millions out of power due to nothing more than an over load. No down power lines. I've never heard of this happening in the winter. What gives? Any Texas feedback?

Makes me wonder what would happen if everyone had an electric car and tried to charge them all up at the same time.

I know its a disaster now with all the broken water pipes. Hopefully it will warm up soon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
This countries infrastructure as a whole is not up to par.
Hopefully theyre able to get this under control in a timely manner.
 

·
Registered
1990 ex500
Joined
·
6 Posts
Millions out of power due to nothing more than an over load. No down power lines. I've never heard of this happening in the winter. What gives? Any Texas feedback?

Makes me wonder what would happen if everyone had an electric car and tried to charge them all up at the same time.

I know its a disaster now with all the broken water pipes. Hopefully it will warm up soon.
Why would the system overload is what I'm wondering. Doesn't everyone run air conditioners when it's hot? AC pulls more amps than electric heat, and most homes have gas furnace heat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,469 Posts
Their foolish commitment to the greenies idea of global warming. Too many windmill with out backup wit reliable fossil fuel generators. As the windmill froze and dropped of line the demand of the storm increased.
‘they may learn that clean energy is only from Neuclear for now

FOG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
413 Posts
From what I've read, windmills have to be connected to the grid to produce power. Texas didn't bother to winterize their fossil fuel generators because its Texas, not Montana. Its not supposed to get cold. Once the conventional plants freeze up and go off-line, the grid fails, there is no power to energize the windmill field windings, so no power can be produced. The wind mills also need power to keep the blades de-iced in sub-freezing weather. So it was a cascading series of failures leading to ever more failures.

I'm no fan of windmills and think they are a blight on the landscape but lots of windmills seem to operate reliably enough in Northern climates if the entire grid is winter ready. I think the Texas power operators were cutting corners and the extreme weather simply caught them with their pants down.

And you're right BPE. What happens if everybody decides to get an electric car. Where is all that electricity going to come from? Nowadays it takes 25 years of environmental studies and legal wrangling just to build a new power plant or transmission line. The spot prices for electricity were going so crazy in Texas that at one point it would have cost $900 to charge a Tesla (if you could find a plug that worked).
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,421 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Why would the system overload is what I'm wondering. Doesn't everyone run air conditioners when it's hot? AC pulls more amps than electric heat, and most homes have gas furnace heat.
^ That's exactly what I was thinking.

I saw on the news about those frozen windmills. But how dependent can Texas possibly be on windmill power. I've been all through that state and never saw a windmill.

It's not as uncommon as some may think for Texas to experience these temps. It may be just a little later in the year than normal, and certainly the duration of this round is unusual.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Johann

·
Registered
Joined
·
863 Posts
When the cold hit too many people turned on their electric heaters. The system couldn't handle it all at once. But look at the graph below. Notice the wind and solar outputs. They're practically useless...in the times that they need it the most!

Bottom line is that this whole "global cooling"....ERRRRRRRRR...."global warming"....ERRRRRRRRRR......"climate change" is a crock. It's a money maker off of fear. So they put useless wind turbines and solar panels (that harm the environment more than they'd ever tell you as they aren't recyclable when they've reached their limit of operation) that don't produce anywhere near enough the power demands.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
In the last six months I’ve heard one phrase more often than I had in my previous 66 years: “Can you believe this is happening in America?”
As in: “I spent the whole day hunting online for a drugstore to get a Covid vaccination. Can you believe this is happening in America?”
“Fellow Americans ransacked our Capitol and tried to overturn an election. Can you believe this is happening in America?”
“People in Texas are burning their furniture for heat, boiling water to drink and melting snow to flush their toilets. Can you believe this is happening in America?”

But, hey, all the news is not bad. We just sent a high-tech buggy named Perseverance loaded with cameras and scientific gear 292 million miles into space and landed it on the exact dot we were aiming for on Mars! Only in America!
What’s going on? Well, in the case of Texas and Mars, the basic answers are simple. Texas is the poster child for what happens when you turn everything into politics — including science, Mother Nature and energy — and try to maximize short-term profits over long-term resilience in an era of extreme weather. The Mars landing is the poster child for letting science guide us and inspire audacious goals and the long-term investments to achieve them.
The Mars mind-set used to be more our norm. The Texas mind-set has replaced it in way too many cases. Going forward, if we want more Mars landings and fewer Texas collapses — what’s happening to people there is truly heartbreaking — we need to take a cold, hard look at what produced each.
The essence of Texas thinking was expressed by Gov. Greg Abbott in the first big interview he gave to explain why the state’s electricity grid failed during a record freeze. He told Fox News’s Sean Hannity: “This shows how the Green New Deal would be a deadly deal for the United States of America. … Our wind and our solar got shut down, and they were collectively more than 10 percent of our power grid, and that thrust Texas into a situation where it was lacking power on a statewide basis. … It just shows that fossil fuel is necessary.”
The combined dishonesty and boneheadedness of those few sentences was breathtaking. The truth? Texas radically deregulated its energy market in ways that encouraged every producer to generate the most energy at the least cost with the least resilience — and to ignore the long-term trend toward more extreme weather.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,234 Posts
yeah. but green energy isn't green. never was never will be a supplement to carbon neutralism may be. but a total dependency on it total folly. don't agree well that's fine. lets just look at some facts. to make one turbine or solar panel.
first you have to look at what they are made of and how it gets to the point it provides some of this free green power.

they are made from steel. glass fibre. copper. manganese. aluminium. and in the case of solar precious metals and glass.
to fix them in place they need concrete that contains cement and steel bars. so to make one first you have to mine the ingredients. (at a cost to the environment) transport it to a plant heat them to high temps to make basic raw materials. then transport to another plant to make into parts using great heat. then transport the parts to the assembly plant. then transport again to the site. and finally fix in place.
the carbon footprint with all this manufacture and transporting is so high before it makes a single watt of power it takes at least 7 years of continued use to be carbon neutral after 10/12 years they have to be replaced and are not recycled but scrapped. more environment issues. in the meantime if it's not windy or the sun isn't shining no power produced.

so you have to have some other source of power the greenies hate nuclear so what's the back up when you get rid of all your fossil fuels ask Texas. the world stops. not only that if you give up the means to make this wonderful green energy (fossil fuels are the only known source of providing great heat) who is going to make them for you. yup all the other countries that refuse to give up theirs. you become a consumer not a provider collapsing the economy.

good luck with your new green deal it wont be aces you get but a pair of 3's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
North Texas here, green energy had very little to do w/ this, it was simple supply and demand.

The Texas grid is designed for peak usage in July/Aug/Sept, so when its gets to be 110 degrees outside the power plants which are primarily gas powered have all the natural gas they need t to generate MW of energy, I mean I'm not running my gas furnace when its 110 outside.

So come Sunday the temps are dropping into the single digits, I;ve lived in Dallas for 30+ years and I don;t recall ever seeing single digits, so those gas powered power plants start cranking MWs and at the same time at my house, the gas furnace is running none stop (BTW folks forget most home HVAC systems are designed for a 30 degree delta, ie if its 10 degrees out, you should expect the inside temp to be 40, yea, my furnace is going to run non-stop), so I;m sucking down as much natural gas as I can get.

See the problem? the grid was not designed to have consumers sucking down gas at the same time as the power plants. So the power plants that were operating could not maintain line pressure because there was not enough gas in the system. Add to the fact the pipelines were not engineered for extreme cold it all cascaded down. The -2 Tuesday morning was the coldest in 120 years, 120 years ! normally in mid-Feb in Dallas its 60 during the day and 40 at night.

The windmills are a strawman for the real cause, ERCOTs winter plan calls for like 5% wind power, wind is just not the winter plan, last time I checked you need temp differential to create wind and we don't have much wind in the winter here, spring is a different story. ERCOT's plan forecasted a max low of 10 degrees, and they had NO plan if it dropped below that.

It went from potential blackouts at like 11pm Sunday, to rolling blackouts at 2am Monday, so we had a 3 hour warning in the middle of damn night to prepare. Since this deep freeze had been forecasted for a good week and once the weathermen on TV got it right, almost to a T on the temps and snowfall, Governor Abbot or someone should have gone on TV on Saturday and said "hey its gonna get very very cold next week and you should prepare for extend periods of time w/o power, just like South Texas does during hurricane season," Would that have made a difference I don;t know and we will never know because no one and I mean no one in Gov't mentioned blackouts until they happened. But windmills were not the problem. The problem is lax planning and failure of state gov;t and a junior senator to accept responsibility.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,421 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I was only in Dallas for 4 years. Saw temps drop near zero there 2 or 3 times. Once I walked about 15 feet off shore on ice covering White Rock Lake (ice went much further but started looking thin). No one ever lost power, but back then the population of the metroplex was about 3 million. I'm guessing there's more people there now. In GA we use nuclear power. Texas should go nuclear, I'm guessing if they did my natural gas bill would go down 😁.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top