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I’ve heard mention elsewhere on this forum of other members who ride bicycles with some regularity. It’s the off season for most cyclists around here where I am, but I’m not a cyclist for recreational purposes. I’m a daily commuter and use my bike year round.

Additionally, I work at a bike shop! It’s a unique organization, being one part of a larger nonprofit that does bike advocacy and education in our community. Last year I did a week of bike camp, riding around teaching bike safety to kids. It was great fun. But most of the time I’m in the shop helping people shop for bikes, parts, and whatever. I also do some bike mechanic stuff, and occasionally build custom bikes.

As for my bike, it’s a Bridgestone 550 that I’ve converted to a single speed. It’s definitely a work in progress, bit of a Frankenstein, but I’ve never had a bike that I loved riding so much. Photo below.

How about you guys? What’s your love affair with the most efficient vehicle known to man like? And let’s see them! Post a photo!
 

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Fog's a old Bike racer starting in the 50s to the 70s I was profsonally trained by a former 6 day racer Gerad DeBates. Look him up.
I still ride a bit now at 80 years old but I'm not very good.
What gear are you riding on your fixed wheel? or is it a fixed wheel. I training rides in north jersey I usually rode a 77-84 depending on the plan for that day.
I think bike training is the best exercise next to swimming . I hate swimming .
I credit the external physical fitness I was in during those years for my excellent health now.Thats me on the left at 70 with my lifelong friend and fellow racer Ken B,and finally @ 16 on my Raleigh Clubman
FOG
 

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I haven't ridden a bicycle in a day and forever but....

My one claim to fame would be that I was the VERY FIRST Military Policeman Bicycle Patrolman at the NTC / Ft. Irwin, CA!!!

I completed the bike patrol school with the San Bernardino Sheriff's Academy. It was great training and I was the first one back on the 25-mile "You Graduated" ride!

And that's all I got. :wink2:
 

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I'm what I would call a hobby cyclist. I'm not serious enough to be a club racer, but I'm more serious than a casual cyclist.



I commute almost daily....only not when it's raining nor below about 35 degrees. I'm serious about it, but not serious enough to tempt riding myself into a case of pneumonia.



On a daily and on my weekend rides, I ride a Fuji Roubaix 1.5 these days. I have an Orbea Onix TDF with a full Shimano Ultegra group that I used to ride until I cracked the rear triangle. I bought the Fuji while I was waiting to hear back from Orbea about a new frame.



For now at least, it looks as though I won't be getting that frame despite my registering the bike with Orbea a day or two after I bought the bike. The dealer I got it from is now out of business. Orbea says, I need the reciept and I have to find a bike shop to "sponsor" my claim. Like that's gonna happen.



My Fuji is equipped with a partial Shimano 105 group in that, it has 105 shifters and derailliures. Everything else is Fuji's house brand or similar. That's not actually all that bad. The seat is actually quite comfortable, more so than the Selle Italia Gel Flow that is on my Orbea.









The difference in ride performance is quite noticeable. The Fuji generally does nothing wrong. It is reliable yet not remarkable in any way. I think possibly if it were equipped with a more performance oriented group it might seem better but I doubt it. That's not to say I don't enjoy riding it.



The Orbea is like riding a coiled spring. When you jump on the pedals to climb a hill, it just shoots forward. The Fuji does not respond like that. It still goes, it just doesn't shoot forward like the Orbea. That's the difference between a full carbon frame and an alloy frame with a carbon fork.



Outside of the basic bike, I ride with Crank Brothers Eggbeater pedals. Yes, I realize they are MTB oriented but they're perfect for commute riding or anytime you ride in traffic. Easy to clip in, easy to clip out. I use Crank Brothers road cleat adapters on my road shoes so I can both use the Eggbeaters and have a built in "pontoon" to walk on.



I pedal around 14 miles on a daily....weekends I try to go around 20 miles but I also go shorter distances if I have plenty of hills to climb.



In the future, I'm looking at a Bianchi. I really like the Intenso and I now have a local dealer. I'm thinking a full Ultegra group on this one also. In the mean time, I'm also looking on eBay for a new frame so I can transfer over my Ultegra group. I'm just going to send my cracked frame back to Orbea and tell them to keep it. I'm not interested in another. Not because the performance sucks, but trying to get the warranty honored does. ....sean
 
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Until recently, I hadn't ridden a bicycle since I was a teenager. As soon as I was old enough for a driver's license that was it for me and bicycle riding. Then, a couple of years ago, some friends talked me into trying out a loaner mountain bike. I found pedaling up and down the hilly, rocky local trails to be a different sort of challenge and the exercise didn't hurt, either. (Actually, it did, but you know what I mean!) Eventually I wound up buying myself a decent full suspension mountain bike with disc brakes front and rear, a dropper seat for going down the steep hills, and adjustable Fox shocks. Its a marvel of lightweight precision engineering. Even more amazing is the price of the smallest replacement part, and I thought the cost of motorcycle parts was off the charts. So I try my damnedest not to break it.


I stumbled on this the other day: https://www.ebay.ca/itm/Kawasaki-DX-Full-Suspension-Mountain-Bike-26-inch-Wheels-19-inch-Frame-Mens/183506376436?epid=22025175784&hash=item2ab9d516f4:g:dGIAAOSwPjhb1FCz


Can't be much of a bike at that price point but I had no idea Kawasaki made bicycles at all.
 

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Swore that before I dropped dead, I would have a decent mountain bike. Bought a Motobecane branded (Giant) dual suspension alloy-framed cantilever bike. It is heavier than a solid frame but after two spinal surgeries, I wanted come cush. Kinda cheapo but sufficient Rockshox Dart1 forks, cheap KS260 rear shock. Upgraded to a WTB Pure-V sport saddle on an alloy post, Brakco floating discs (203 front, 180 rear), Shimano trigger shifters, Oury super-spongy grips, a Satori adjustable stem on a riser, a front chainwheel anti-derail guide, a SRAM PG850 cassette (11-32T), SKS QD fenders for rain and maybe a couple of other things. Have changed tires a few times. Velociraptors no good for pavement. Conti reverse knobbies not good in dirt or gravel. Finally settled on Performance Bicycle's Dartmoor "street knobby" tires, which are a pretty good compromise. Oddly enough, I did a fair amount of daily riding (8-12 miles nightly) when I was full of cancer. Subsequent high-dose chemo, total body irradiation and a stem cell transplant pretty much knocked the wind out of me. Am gaining it back, but patience pays.
 

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The Orbea is like riding a coiled spring."

Funny thing back when I was racing bikes, they were all made of steel tubbing. The best were made from tapered tubes of Reynolds 531 steel tubs brazed into machined from solid lugs , The longer the reach of the lugs the better.
I could certainly tell the difference . the cheaper bikes seem to just absorb your energy. while a good bike would scoot.
My road bike was custom made for me in Scotland and the lugs were form of art .cost me the princely sum of $140 shipped from Scotland. Less wheels, which I laced myself from components sources fro Italy.
My friend designed and built a Frame from Fiberglass in the 50s but it was a terrible disappointment , He was on the right track but didn't have Craabon fiber tech.
I marvel at the modern bikes and speculate that the vast improvement in rider performance might be largely do to that. The 25 mile time trial times have dropped drastically from just over 60 min to what? 40 or less

FOG
 

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the cheaper bikes seem to just absorb your energy. while a good bike would scoot

I found that to be true of the earlier carbon frames. I initially rode a full carbon Fuji Team bike equipped with Shimano Dura Ace. To be honest, I was highly disappointed.



The Orbea was a huge leap forward. That Fuji was carbon, but the tubes were simply carbon versions of the steel ones. IE, small diameter and not very rigid.



The bottom bracket specifically is huge on the Orbea. It looks more like a blob of carbon than a traditional bottom bracket. As such, it does not twist or flex at all when you put the power down through the pedals. Coupled with a massive front down tube and chain stays that are rigid as well, I really think that is where that "coiled spring" feel comes from.



I marvel at the modern bikes and speculate that the vast improvement in rider performance might be largely do to that. The 25 mile time trial times have dropped drastically from just over 60 min to what? 40 or less

Certainly some of that time drop comes from the technology that has gone into the bikes. A carbon aero time trial bike is something a world different than even my Orbea.



Sticking with the theme, an Orbea Ordu is much more aerodynamic and provides the rider with a more aerodynamic position on it.




The frame fits close to the rear wheel, like a glove really. The frame beams are massive in section to channel every bit of energy to the rear wheel. The rider position is extreme, and when coupled with the time trial specific helmets and speed suits the result is a much more aerodynamically efficient rider. Which also means the energy the rider expends to go fast, is reduced.



In 1963 Jacques Anquetil rode the Angers time trial at 46.9 KMH. In 2017, Garant Thomas rode the Dusseldorf time trial at 52.28 KMH.



That's a considerable 6 KMH difference which I could comfortably speculate is down the to the difference in technology.......sean
 

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My whole family has been into bikes for quite some time now, I think between my two parents, my brother and myself, probably at least 30 bikes are owned.

My brother is the real professional mechanic, went to UBI 12 years or so ago and has been a mechanic ever since, worked at damn near every shop in a 15 mile radius. He's got a few real gems in his collection, such as a mid-90's Serotta Colorado Legend. His two favorite bikes though are his early Cannondale touring frame built up with 7 speed Shimano 600 and an early 80's Specialized Allez with full Suntour Superbe group set. The former is his commuter and the latter being his racer, which he's used in a few vintage criteriums.

As for me, my commuter for the last 13 years, though I've only used it for recreational riding the last 4 years, is a 2001-ish Cannondale R300 upgraded to Shimano 105 components with 36 spoke hubs laced to Mavic Open Pro's. Thing is bulletproof. I've crashed it at 24mph before and rode it home. Once I upgraded the wheels as I was sick of breaking spokes, I can't even knock them out of true. Now, everyone loves to hate on aluminum frames, Cannondales in particular, but I love mine. I don't notice to frame rigidity, probably because I've been riding it for so long.

I've got a few projects in the works too. I've got a 1998 Klein Mantra Pro I'm doing a full restoration on which will get painted next month.
I've also got a 1998 Cannondale R4000 in original stars and stripes livery I'm most of the way through restoring. Came with full Dura Ace and almost all the components are still good. Picked it up for 300 bucks this summer. Only two things needing replacement were the lower headset bearings and bottom bracket. Got lucky at the local used bike place my brother has worked at before and got the unobtanium headset there and my dad just so happened to have the exact correct Dura Ace bottom bracket in his stash. That'll be done at the end of the month and I'll post a picture of it then.

I pickup up a very rough but straight hardtail 90's Marin Team Marin which will get built up with period correct Deore XT so I can go hammer it up in Annadel, Muir Woods and the Santa Cruz Mountains.

In case you haven't figured it out, my brother and I are big into 80's and 90's bikes. You can get very high quality bikes and components for dirt cheap.
 

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My other bike is a Ferrari. :wink2:and just how many of you guys can honestly say that your wife bought you a Ferrari for Christmas?

I've been riding bikes regularly since the age of about 4 and along with the MTB also have a Carrera road bike. Nothing too special, alloy frame, carbon forks and a halfway decent set of wheels. I'm not trying to win any races or impress anybody, just having a bit of fun getting some fresh air and exercise with the added benefit of keeping in shape. I also ride a fixie on the odd occasion but as it's so hilly around here is only geared to about 72". Much more and I'd be walking up hills.
 

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I've got an old Trek 2200 carbon frame with Campagnolo group, from early 90's?

Haven't ridden in years, but, in the interest of health benefits, will be when weather more cooperative.
 

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I've got an old Trek 2200 carbon frame with Campagnolo group, from early 90's?

Haven't ridden in years, but, in the interest of health benefits, will be when weather more cooperative.
Those early carbon frames are cool but I'm a bit leery of them these days. It's carbon tubes bonded to aluminum lugs and the epoxy can fail at this age, especially ones which have been ridden a lot. Vitus did basically the same thing but with aluminum tubes in aluminum lugs and I've seen those fail. My brother had one with a front drop out fall out. You could also see the paint cracking right where the tube would meet the lug. That's the telltale sign. The carbon tubes do the same thing, so inspect yours closely before taking it out.
@Gremlin, I used to be big into fixed gears. Built one fresh out of high school, so back in '06. Got a better frame a couple years later and swapped the components over. Couple years after that, I got into a tangle with another cyclist and bent the steering head, top tube, down tube and fork, but all my parts were good including the front wheel. Very well built, didn't even get knocked out of true. Then the parts sat for 8 years until I finally got the frame my brother gave me 3 years ago prepped, sand blasted and powder coated and finished building it this last fall, only to realize I really had no intention of riding it anymore. So, it's now wall art.
 

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Swore that before I dropped dead, I would have a decent mountain bike. Bought a Motobecane branded (Giant) dual suspension alloy-framed cantilever bike.
I actually have the Giant branded version. I got mine used for dirt cheap and then completely rebuilt it.



It now wears a modern hydraulic damped Rock Shox Reba fork and a coil spring Fox shock, a complete Shimano LX shifter group, Mavic disc wheels with Avid Juicy 5 front disc brake and Avid cable rear disc brake.



About the only thing left stock is the frame and the seat post...and only then because Giant uses some off the wall sized seat post.



I also had to ditch the Velociraptor tires. Great in the dirt. Not great on the pavement. I ended up going with some Bontrager (Trek house brand) tires that were take off's from a buddy's MTB. They seem to be a reasonable pavement/dirt road tire.



I don't ride it much on the pavement unless it's to get to a dirt or gravel road. The rear suspension soaks up too much energy on the pavement. That leaves you fatigued before you actually get anywhere. It's like running in mud up to your ankles by comparison.....sean
 

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I don't ride it much on the pavement unless it's to get to a dirt or gravel road. The rear suspension soaks up too much energy on the pavement. That leaves you fatigued before you actually get anywhere. It's like running in mud up to your ankles by comparison.....sean
Yup. Rear shock upgrade is a priority. Pretty bouncy as is. But, pavement is my limit, due to osteoporosis. Last off-road trek I fractured my right scapula, glenoid and 5 ribs into 12 pieces. OK, I went off-roading at night on my EX, but still...


Heck of a way to find out that you need glasses.
 

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I envy all of the modern bikes you fellows have. In my day 50s all we could get was European stuff of dubious quality. Like the French Simplex 3 speed deralieir and sewn in tube tires that held air for a few hours at best, and went flat if you rode over a bug. We had to carry a spare tire folded under the seat.
I swear today you can get better hinging in plastic bags in Wal-Mart.
I’m tempted to take my next SS check down to the bike store to see what I can get
I fear it may take severs Ss checksthough.

Just to look at mind you

Fog
 

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I'm still riding European stuff of dubious quality :wink2: although in fairness it was probably built in Taiwan. I was only out on my roadbike this morning and my mind wandered back to a day when I took my cycling a lot more seriously than I do now. These days I only have to flick one finger against a lever or button on my brake levers to change gear and it happens so smoothly as if by magic. (Indexed gearing). Back in the late 70s early 80s the gear lever would have been mounted on the downtube so you had to take your hands off the bars and manually move a lever to exactly the right place to change gear while the deraillieur clattered in complaint! I certainly can't imagine all that faffing about while riding off road on a modern MTB, a type of bike that didn't even exist back then either. Or the BMX come to think of it.
Some of us kids back then, with a bit of imagination and a box of spare parts did build bikes to suit our own specific requirements but who knew we'd pre-empted MTBs and BMXs by at least a decade. Don't even ask about the upside-down bike that used a broom handle for a seatpost. :laugh:
 

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I envy all of the modern bikes you fellows have.



I’m tempted to take my next SS check down to the bike store to see what I can get


I fear it may take severs Ss checksthough.

Just to look at mind you

Fog

That's probably quite accurate FOG. Particularly if you want to continue with the European stuff of dubious quality....


Okay, the quality isn't so dubious anymore but the European origins are.



Most of the top quality brand names have their frames made in Taiwan or China. Almost all in fact.



For the privilege of owning a lower tier Bianchi the cost of entry is still in the mid thousand dollar range. A mid tier? $3-$4K.



Top of the line? Forget it. $8K to well past $10K. For a bike with no motor. :grin2:


The prices on other Euro brand bikes is roughly the same ball park. Canyon (Germany), Orbea (Spain), Colnago, Pinarello, Wilier (Italy) all come in around the same price point or even slightly higher.



All have their carbon frames made in China or Taiwan. That's not to say they aren't a high quality product. As my buddy Rick once said, they've mastered the art of carbon fiber bike building.



The other major players are not exempt from that either. Cannondale, Giant, Jamis, Scott, Trek, Specialized (US)....Cervelo' (Canada) and even Fuji and Kestrel (Japan) all have carbon fiber frames manufactured in China or Taiwan. Trek and Specialized do make some of their frames in the US but those are their upper end products that retail for well past $10K.



For a while there you could find really good deals on a new Fuji at any Performance Bicycle or on their website. Even Bike Nashbar had reasonable prices on them. I recently received an email stating Performance Bikes was now part of some other cycling and hobby company.



Now their website is devoid of Fuji bicycles. Nashbar now looks exactly like PB with different colors and is similarly devoid of Fuji bikes.....sean
 
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