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Discussion Starter #21
YB4:

The YB4 was a homologation special to qualify Bimota to race in World Superbikes. The YB4ie was powered by a Yamaha FZ750 engine with 5 valves per cylinder that made 121 hp at 10,500 rpm. Bimota were obliged to build 200 of them so they could compete. Bimota built 303 of them in all for 1988.

SB4:

The SB4 was built in 1983 and powered by the GSX1100 engine. It weighed in at 465 lbs full of fluids which was light when compared to te GSX donor. The frame and body work are very similar to that which Bimota used for the HB2 and HB3 as well as the KB3.

DB4:

The DB4 was a later Ducati powered bike. The frame is quite similar to the BB1 and the DB3. All three used oval section aluminum tube to construct the frame. It was produced in 1998 and just 264 were built. It was also powered by the 900SS engine that powered both the DB2 and 3. At just 363 lbs it was lighter, lower and shorter in wheel base than that year's Yamaha R6.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
This is as good a spot as any to paste in the post that started me down this road. Here it is as I've moved it from David's thread in the off topic section. If you copied and pasted this post in his thread, please delete all of what I posted from your own post please, thanks.....sean


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00ninja said:
More Bimota pics.....please and thank you ;)
Here's an action pic for you. Not my picture, all credit goes to Superbike Planet because that's where I stole it from.

That's Giancarlo Falapa riding the WSBK Bimota in 1989 at Brainerd, MN. He won 3 races that year and finished 6th in the championship. He was nearly killed testing a Ducati 916 in 1994 and never raced again. He's famous or infamous in AMA legend for pulling a wheelie coming out of turn 9 at Brainerd, Minnesota and standing on the pegs of the Bimota to touch his helmet on the underside of the bridge that went over the track! The pictured bike with Falapa aboard is the YB4 powered by an FZR 750 engine. For those not familiar, Bimota motorcycles present the manufacturer of the engine as the first initial in the bike designation. A "Y" indicates it is a Yamaha powered bike and the number 4 that it is the 4th Yamaha powered Bimota. The "B" is obviously for Bimota. Another below from GPOne.com


Finally, the newest Bimota the BB3. The new WSBK machine is powered by an S1000RR BMW engine and is apparently the 3rd Bimota powered by BMW engine. Not 100% sure but the BB1 was built just for one year, 1995. It was powered by an F650 engine which was actually built for BMW by Aprilia. The BB2 was built with the S1000RR engine like the BB3 but was introduced in 2012. It has a typical Bimota look to it, that is it is decidedly different though still a great looking bike.

image from MCN Australia
The BB1:

Image from Cycle Specs in NZ
The BB2:

image from asphalt and rubber dot com

That enough to tide you over 00?.....sean
 

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Discussion Starter #23
The reason I chose to insert the content of the post from David's thread where I did is that essentially, the #4 bikes are pretty much where Bimota went with two manufacturers from this point until the demise of the original company. The #5 bikes are down to Yamaha and Suzuki essentially. So to start with, here is a Bimota SB5

It was built in 1985 and featured the power plant of the then current GS1100ES. What is significant about this model is that for the first time, Bimota was able to buy the engine directly from Suzuki instead of buying complete bikes and selling off the unused parts as spares. Power figures are the same as for the SB4. 158 were produced.

YB5:

Once again Bimota utilized the same basic frame pioneered with the HB2. The YB5 was produced between 1987 and 1988. 208 were produced using Yamaha's FJ1200 engine. It made 130 hp at 9000 rpm and 80 lb/ft at 7500 rpm.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
The YB6:

Built from the FZR1000 engine, it retained Yamaha's EXUP valve. The frame, like the YB4 was a twin beam aluminum affair that was a first for road going motorcycle. The FZR engine made 147 hp at 10,000 rpm and 79 lb/ft at 8500. The bike weighed 50 lbs less than the stock FZR. 546 were built between 1988 and 1990

The SB6:

In my mind, the most beautiful Bimota ever constructed. Power came from a GSXR 1100 of the day in a frame that used what Bimota called "Straight Line Connection" In everyday terms, the frame made a straight line from the steering head to the swing arm pivot. Body work was all carbon fiber...and that was in 1994. 1144 were built that year and the bike weighed just 419 lbs. The GSXR engine put out 155 hp at 10,000 rpm and 74 lb/ft at 8400. It was the size of a 600 with the power of an 1100.
 

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I really want something with that 1100 or 1200. Bimota would be nice but Katana, Gixxer, or Bandit are more feasible.
 

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mangosmoothie said:
I really want something with that 1100 or 1200. Bimota would be nice but Katana, Gixxer, or Bandit are more feasible.
This from the guy that wants to get out of riding

::) :eek: : ;D
 

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Discussion Starter #27
mangosmoothie said:
I really want something with that 1100 or 1200. Bimota would be nice but Katana, Gixxer, or Bandit are more feasible.
The Gixxer 1100 engine and Bandit/Katana 1100 engines are quite different. That is, unless you go old school GSXR. Air and oil cooled GSXRs ceased production in 1992. While the 1100 carried on into the late 90s, it was water cooled beginning in 1993. The GSXR lump that Bimota used was the water cooled 1994 engine which was an improvement over the original 1993 engine but the ones to get were the post 1995 engines as they underwent a major change in 95. As for the Bimota......they're almost unobtanium. SB6s do come along for sale once in a while but you're probably looking at in excess of $10K for one. Serial #1 was up for sale this year but was snapped up in 24 hours.
(I looked around a bit on the web...most bikes up for sale have sold within a very short time frame. The last SB6 I saw was going for $15.5K.) While I dearly love Bimotas I cannot justify spending anywhere near $10K on a 20-25 year old motorcycle......sean
 

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Discussion Starter #28
YB7:


The YB7 was built from Yamaha's FZR400. It was built for just one year, 1988. Only 321 were built. Bimota tuned the FZR engine to make 68 hp at 13000 rpm or about 2 more than the standard FZR. The YB7 weighs in at just 352 lbs though so 68 hp is more than enough to make things exciting. Think for a moment how an EX acclerates but imagine it with more horsepower, a lighter and more rigid chassis that handles like a MotoGP bike and I think you'd have the YB7. Bimota was after an entry into the Japanese domestic market so that was the genesis of the design. It's a perfectly scaled down version of the YB6...or a baby Bimota if you like.

SB7:

The SB7 is a completely different train of thought. It is the baby brother to the SB6 for sure but it was intended as the Homologation Special to get Bimota back into World Superbikes. Therefore it was built on the GSXR750 engine from 1994. There were exactly 200 built which is the number required by WSBK regulation for homologation. It made 132 hp at 10,000 rpm and 61 lb/ft at 8500. It was injected rather than carbureted with Bimota buying the Sport Production engine directly from Suzuki. The "SP" version of the GSXR engine was already of a higher spec than the standard road going bike. Add to that, Bimota's use of its proprietary injection system and their own cams the SB7 was intended to be a WSBK competitor that you could buy for road use. That is, if you were prepared to plunk down the requisite $27K to own it. more later.....sean
 

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Re:

This is a great right up. Try selling it to a magazine. My brother has a Mitto, a couple gray market 2 stroke 250's and a Haga/Edwards replica 1000. When he put the down payment on the vdue he was in his 2 stroke only mode and had a 500 cc yamaha 2 stroke.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Re:

1256day said:
This is a great right up. Try selling it to a magazine. My brother has a Mitto, a couple gray market 2 stroke 250's and a Haga/Edwards replica 1000. When he put the down payment on the vdue he was in his 2 stroke only mode and had a 500 cc yamaha 2 stroke.
Nice!. The Mito is a really interesting little machine. Two stroke 125, 7 speed transmission. Cagiva is also a portmanteau, like Bimota. Cagiva is a portmanteau of Castiglione, Giovanni de Varese. That is, Giovanni Castiglione of Varese. Mito is Italian for Myth. The Cagiva 500GP bike was also called the Mito. That was quite possible the most beautiful GP bike ever constructed. The bike below is the same bike in the second pic of my sig.....sean
 

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Discussion Starter #31
YB8:

The twin head light YB8 was built from 1990 to 1992. Twin head lamps were some what in vogue at that time. 252 were built and they were powered by Yamaha's FZR1000 engine complete with the EXUP valve. It made 150 hp at 10500 rpm and 86 lb/ft at 9250.

SB8:

The SB8 differs in more respects than the engine from the Yamaha. It was quite possibly the most numerous Bimota ever built at 2000 examples. It was powered by the TL1000R engine which itself differed from the TL1000S engine that preceded it. It also differs in that Anthony Gobert actually won a WSBK race at Phillip Island on one. The TL-R engine made 133 hp at 9500 rpm and 74 lb/ft at 8500. With both peaks arriving so close together the bike was a handful to keep planted on the ground. A full throttle roll on at low speed would wheelie the bike in any of the lower 4 gears. That and the SB8 weighed just 436 lbs full of fluids.

Another thing that separates the SB8 from all other bikes, even its Bimota siblings is its composite chassis which was designed by Pierluigi Marconi. It used technology borrowed from the Cagiva 500 GP bike from my previous post. It had twin aluminum beams but they mated to carbon fiber pivot plates. Also, the rear section was a single structural carbon part that was self supporting. No subframe in other words.

Not long after I got my Aprilia, my wife and I were headed to the coast for a blast up Hwy 1. On our way, we stopped for second to decide which road we'd rather take. As we were getting ready to leave that particular parking lot, I heard a V-twin down shifting for the stop sign we'd just passed. I looked and saw a rider stopping. He nodded, I nodded and I didn't think anything more of it. Then when we got going again, we caught up to him (traffic of course!) Turned out that he was riding an SB8. The three of us rode staggered formation to the Fairfax-Bollinas road that went out to Hwy 1. He turned off on Nicasio Valley Road as traffic was not great and a CHP had joined the funeral procession from a turnout ahead of us. For that short time we rode together the sound of the Aprilia and the Bimota echoed off the canyon walls in a symphony of bass that had to be experienced to be believed. The Italians have a phrase often used to describe such a sound, Basso Profundo. In Italian it means "deep bass singing voice" but to me, it means the sound of peformance V-Twins. Anyway, it was an amazing experience...just wish I could've ridden the Bimota for a short bit to know what it was like........sean
 

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Discussion Starter #32

The YB9 was built from 1994 to 1996. 651 were built from the YZF600R engine. It made right at 100 hp @ 11,500 rpm and about 50 lb/ft at 9500. Having owned a 600R I can say that it had quite a motor. The only things that let it down were the transmission and the suspension. Given that the strong point of the Bimota would be the chassis, I can only imagine that the bag of spanners transmission shifting would afflict the Bimota similarly. Bimota added their proprietary fuel injection to the YB9. While the engine still makes the same horsepower as the stock bike, the injected version spins up faster.

There was no Suzuki based SB9. Instead, Bimota went on to develop their own fuel injected two stroke engine powered bike they named the V-due. (pronounced Vee-doo-ay) So, here's the V-due:

It was a 2 stroke V-twin that displaced 500cc to compete in the 500GP class. Problem was, 500GPs were going to move to four strokes shortly after the V-due development was complete. It was built from 1997 to 1999 and just 150 were built. MotoGP with the phased in use of four strokes began in 2002 making 2001 the final year of two stroke competition. There were still some on the grid in 2002 but that was the last year they were used. At best, the V-due would have been eligible to compete for a mere 5 years. However, both Honda and Aprilia proved that V-twin two strokes were not nearly fast enough to really compete with the V4s.

The V-due made just 110 hp at 9000 rpm in street tune and weighed in at 388 lbs. Anyone who followed 500GPs would know that the V4 bikes were making somewhere in the neighborhood of 180-190 hp and weighed about 30 lbs less. It's pretty evident that the V-due would have to make a whole lot more power than that to be even close to a contender. Commercially, the V-due was not a success for Bimota. The fuel injection was both the jewel and Achilles Heel of the bike. It took Bimota 8 years to develop its proprietary direct injection technology. It never worked quite like Bimota intended it to. It was supposed to allow the bike to meet strict emissions standards....something it didn't do. It also was supposed to run smoothly without the vicious torque spikes of carbureted two strokes. Something it also didn't do. Bimota actually built 340 of the things but ended up having to re-engineer them to fit carburetors to them to cure the inconsistent fuel injection issues. Only 150 of those actually left the factory. Once the company went bankrupt in 2000, someone bought the remaining 190 bikes and was attempting to sell them. I don't know how many actually sold or if more were manfactured (the tooling was purchased also) but Bimota was no longer in business.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
That leaves just the last two Yamaha powered bikes that Bimota built before bankruptcy. The YB10 and YB11. The YB10:


The YB10 was named the Dieci which is Italian for 10. It was built from 1991 to 1993 and 224 were built. It too used an FZR 1000 engine. It continued the use of the EXUP valve also, like the two Yamaha powered bikes before it.

Also an additional 38 were built as bipostos. As a biposto model it had provisions for a passenger.



The YB11 was another story. Sort of. It used the YZF1000R engine and was built in 1998. Only 50 were built as the "SuperLeggera" It was a more "no compromises" kind of machine and featured 51mm forks. That's not a misprint. Top bikes of the day, and even today feature 43mm forks almost across the board as an example. Acceleration was described as "vicious"
 

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Discussion Starter #34
After Bimota was resurrected from the depths of bankruptcy, the first bike from the new company was actually a bike from the original company. Bimota was bought from creditors in 2003 and in 2004, using the remaining parts, engines and frames acquired in the sale, Bimota released the SB8K "Santa Monica"

The SB8K got a more advanced and refined computerized injection system. The delivery system was also refined and more user friendly. Both could be considered logical progression as things moved on quite a bit in regards to injection technology between 2000 and 2004. Otherwise it was identical in construction and peformance as the previous SB8. More later, with the bikes from the new Bimota......sean
 

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Sean, do I have a Christmas Present for you! Since you have such Bimota lust, and you were just posting about how hard they are to obtain because they rarely go up for sale, imagine owning a WSBK Bimota which ran the first 3/4th the 2014 season before they were disqualified for not making enough of them. Yep, last years WSBK bikes are up for sale.

http://www.asphaltandrubber.com/products/buy-wsbk-race-biketime-christmas/

You should put that under the Christmas tree for yourself. Cheers! ;D
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Jrocket said:
Sean, do I have a Christmas Present for you! Since you have such Bimota lust, and you were just posting about how hard they are to obtain because they rarely go up for sale, imagine owning a WSBK Bimota which ran the first 3/4th the 2014 season before they were disqualified for not making enough of them.

You should put that under the Christmas tree for yourself. Cheers! ;D
Yikes. 65000 Euro......that works out to $79,500 or thereabouts. Not sure I could convince my wife to take out a second mortgage to buy one. LoL......actually if I were to seriously consider owning one, an SB6 or SB8 would be about the only ones I'd be interested in. Okay, maybe a YB11. I just couldn't justify buying one though....even those bikes would be in $10K range for a bike that's quite a few years old......sean
 

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Loving all this Bimota info. Hmmm touching his helmet to the underside of the bridge just to see if he could...gotta give that Falapa dude credit for some brass ones...gotta love crazy like that.

My preferred weapon of motorcycle suicide would have to a Hayabusa. Id love to have one, but my "I want to LIVE" circuits kick in and I walk away. LOL

:)
 

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Discussion Starter #38
CheezDad said:
My preferred weapon of motorcycle suicide would have to a Hayabusa. Id love to have one, but my "I want to LIVE" circuits kick in and I walk away. LOL

:)
I've ridden one. It is blindingly fast, and quick to reach triple digit speeds. I rolled on the throttle in 4th doing about 50 and was well past 100 before I knew it. Hit a small rise in the road and ended up on the back wheel.....I rolled out, and rode the thing back to my house. I gave the key back to the owner and told him to never, ever, under any circumstances, let me ride that thing ever again! I did ride it again on occasion. We'd swap bikes every now then so he could see what the Aprilia would do in certain situations. I never rolled on like I did that day.....but it was like a big ole couch on the freeway....where the Aprilia is like riding in a slammed lowered car. You feel every single ripple and pebble in the road.......sean
 

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Discussion Starter #39

A rare Bimota YB6 World Supersport racer. Image stolen from superbike planet dot com.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
The first all new bike from the resurrected Bimota company, the Tesi 2D:

The second coming of the Tesi was powered by an air cooled 1000DS engine rather than the 888 engine that powered the original Tesi 1D.

The original Tesi began life as a design exercise penned by PierLuigi Marconi as his thesis for his Mechanical Engineering degree. In fact, that is how the Tesi name is derived, from the Italian word for thesis. 1 is for the first of the design and D obviously for Ducati. From some of the reseach I did, there were several versions of the 1D some powered by the 888 engine and others with the 851 engine. Not all had the same body work either. All did have the same alternative hub center steering front end. The 2D began life as the Vyrus as a revision of the orignal design by Bimota technician Ascanio Rodrigo in the early 2000s. He released the bike intially but soon signed on with the new Bimota.
 
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