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Discussion Starter #61
Just found this thread - thanks Sean!
No probs. I've been a Bimota fan since I first saw one back in the early 1990s.

I see tons of $30,000+ Harleys around here all the time, and constantly am thinking what that would get you with a Bimota. It's just a shame they are not appreciated.
I don't know that what you are seeing is under appreciation so much as ignorance or disinterest.

There are few riders in the US with knowledge of Bimota and what the brand once stood for.

That's a good example of ignorance....simply a lack of knowledge.

Not an insult, just fact and application of the appropriate terminology.

Then there are bikers, who have next to no interest in anything not a Harley. Their ideals have nothing to do with actual riding but rather a pack mentality and demonstrating individuality among sameness.

That is my definition of disinterest.


Am I mistaken (hope so), or has Bimota closed it's doors recently? I thought I heard something about the plant closing and all of the bikes and parts being shipped out of the country.
Bimota has been bankrupt several times in recent years. There was a resurrection of the company name, but with little in the way of relationship to the original company.

That resurrection brought some new models but almost all exclusively powered by Ducati engines.

There were a couple BMW powered models in that time but to my knowledge, they were intended for competition rather than commercial sale.

Same goes for the one Honda frame they built for Moto2 competition.

I do not know what their current status is beyond some rumors that have circulated around the web recently.
One resource is Bimota Spirit in Raleigh NC. They are a dealer and have an active website as well as a facebook page for furture reference:

https://www.bimotaspirit.com

https://www.facebook.com/Bimota-Spirit-138270249232/

The wikipedia page for Bimota doesn't have any real information beyond the 2003 revival or resurrection of the company.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bimota

The Bimota Italy website doesn't look like it has had an update since sometime in 2015:
http://bimota.it/en/

The last rumor I heard was the company that was resurrected in 2003 went bankrupt again in 2016 and was purchased by a company in Switzerland.

That is rumor and I cannot find any substantiating information about it. That's about it for now...I'll revisit this thread if I find out anything further.......sean
 
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Discussion Starter #62 (Edited)
Am I mistaken (hope so), or has Bimota closed it's doors recently? I thought I heard something about the plant closing and all of the bikes and parts being shipped out of the country.
Cruising around the web today for something to read, I happened across this article in Cycle World online:

https://www.cycleworld.com/storied-italian-motorcycle-company-bimota-hits-another-bump-in-road#page-2

It is dated August of 2017 so is the most current info I was able to find in relation to the Bimota factory. Full text below:
Storied Italian Motorcycle Company Bimota Hits Another Bump In The Road

End of a dream created by Massimo Tamburini

By Bruno dePrato August 31, 2017



Italian motorcycle company Bimota— created by Massimo Tamburini with technical and styling excellence through his hard work and superb creativity—is almost completely extinct. The premises located in via Giaccaglia, on the outskirt of Rimini, are empty.



The Bimota sign has been taken down and the sight of it made me terribly sad.


My memories go back to the enthusiasm and passion that characterized the atmosphere at Bimota in the old days, when Massimo was carefully cutting, bending and welding chrome-moly steel tubing to create the most advanced and refined motorcycle chassis of the time.


Today, a sign says that Bimota moved about 100 yards from the old building, but there is only a 4,500-square-foot storehouse in a public storage building where they piled up the spare parts of the latest Bimota models, in particular the unfortunate BB3.



Only three or four people are working there. The present Bimota owners, Messrs. Daniele Longoni and Marco Chiancianesi, are Italian contractors living and operating in Switzerland.



They’ve moved all the components that would keep production alive for a few months to a shop somewhere near Lugano. This was confirmed to me by an Australian friend, Captain Niels Faerch, who ordered a Bimota Tesi 3 from his local dealer and who confirmed that the bike had been assembled in Switzerland.


Delivery time had been extremely long to the point that Captain Faerch was getting a little anxious about the final outcome of his purchase and related downpayment, but all turned out nicely. What will happen once the stock of components will be gone is a big question mark because it seems that all connections with the real Bimota tradition have been cut.



Bimota changed hands a few times too many, and this last time looks, well, final.


The sequence started after Massimo was stabbed in the back by his “friendly” partner Giuseppe Morri and forced to quit.



That was totally suicidal because Massimo unconditionally was the pillar of Bimota. He wanted to keep Bimota lean, agile, focused on R&D and on the production of a highly advanced frame and beautifully designed body kits, for racing bikes and for street bike as well.



There was a whole new generation of enthusiastic owners of super Japanese Fours begging for better handling, lighter, leaner chassis kits to harness their powerful engines.




Massimo poured his talent, passion, enthusiasm, dedication and technical knowledge to create each Bimota kit and the Bimota legend with them.



Success never diverted him away from his neat, sharp, humble attitude and style. He intended to evolve Bimota step by step with humble and cautious determination, and, most importantly, each new investment had to be carefully pondered and balanced.


This collided with Morri’s plan to make Bimota a fully-fledged motorcycle manufacturer producing complete bikes powered by those same, fabulous Japanese Fours.



This required new, larger, more expensive premises to store the dismantled Japanese motorcycles from which engines and instrumentations were extracted, while the rest was shelved.



Despite many attempts by Bimota, none of the Big Four was open to sell the power units alone. Here is where the financial problems of Bimota started and its decline began, because sales never fully compensated for the massive investments and the staggering costs related to the purchase of the complete bikes and to the handling of the huge stock of leftovers.



There was also plenty of bureaucracy related to the homologations of the new, street-legal models.
In my opinion, Bimota should have stayed lean as Massimo conceived it, progressing step by step, building its superb image through successes in the sport and the perfection and beauty of each new creation.



Giuseppe Morri, the bookkeeper turned CEO, proved inadequate to that position. He was too optimistic and ambitious to make Bimota grow fast, not paying adequate attention to the growing financial loads.



From then on Bimota kept resurrecting from multiple financial breakdowns and bankruptcies thanks to the dedication of a sequence of excellent project engineers who carried the torch that Massimo had ignited more than 40 years ago and that a sequence of inadequate managers kept dousing.


For me, watching the Italian Bimota factory shut down was very sad and I guess it would be to all who knew the real Bimota. The only hope is that some wealthy and capable entrepreneur will feel the urge of picking up the torch and restore Massimo Tamburini’s dream of ultimate beauty and technical excellence. Today’s motorcycling needs to dream again.
 

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Thanks for posting that.

It's been a bumpy road for Bimota lately, but it looks like this may be the end once the stock of parts is exhausted.

Very unfortunate.
 

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The YB6 was just about the only other bike I wished for. My FZR 1000 was just too heavy and the YB6 used the same engine with a several hundred pound lighter chassis

FOG
 

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Discussion Starter #65
The YB6 was just about the only other bike I wished for. My FZR 1000 was just too heavy and the YB6 used the same engine with a several hundred pound lighter chassis

FOG
Honestly FOG, I'd wish for almost any of the later 1980s to mid 1990s Bimotas.

Wouldn't really matter which engine powered it as they are all jewel like in their attention to detail and quality of engineering.

There are few that I look at and think "owning this example isn't what I'd want".

Any of the later Yamaha powered bikes would suit me, but also, any of the the Suzuki powered ones.

If I had to pick one, just based on the absolute distinctiveness of it, I'd probably choose the SB6.

Just something about it.....maybe because it was the first one I ever saw in the flesh. I can't actually explain why.

The fact that it's powered by a GSXR 1100 engine isn't a deal breaker, though truth be known, I'd rather have on powered by a TL1000R engine.

That though, would mean an SB8 or SB8K. While I still like them, neither has the same look as the SB6.

In these colors please:
 
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Discussion Starter #66
Kawasaki buy Bimota!!!!

I thought now would be a good time to undead this thread. Given that in the last few months Kawasaki has purchased Bimota.



There is an all new Kawasaki H2 based Bimota Tesi being flouted on all the major European moto-media sites.

https://www.cycleworld.com/kawasaki-acquires-bimota/


https://www.asphaltandrubber.com/rumors/kawasaki-buys-bimota/


https://www.visordown.com/news/industry/has-kawasaki-just-bought-bimota


I don't know what this means for Bimota....other than more Kawasaki powered bikes versus the previous trends.



I also don't know what this means for Kawasaki. What does Big K hope to glean from this acquisition? Help for their WSBK team? Entry into Moto2 as a chassis builder? Re-establishing what Bimota stood for? Custom built chassis with the most powerful engines available for sale to the general public at premium prices.


Difficult to determine what to make of it, but hey, if Big K does the latter of all those things and makes Bimota pertinent to the modern motorcycle scene then good on them, and I hope like hell they succeed.....sean
 
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Was on patrol one morning in '80 or '81. Saw a Bimota pass by, heading to the 2nd oldest Honda dealership in Washington State. I followed and pulled up behind him in the lot. The sales guys were laughing, thinking that he was going to get written up. Not so!

I had never seen a real, live Bimota - this one an SB-2 (Gen1 Suzuki GS750 motor IIRC). Turns out that he had bought it from Steve Baker - the best team Yamaha GP racer that no one (well, very few) has heard of. He was a contemporary of Kenny Roberts, but Yamaha decided to go with Roberts.

In 1976, Baker won the prestigious Imola 200 pre-season race.[2] His good results earned him a factory sponsored ride with the Yamaha factory team for the 1977 season.[1] He began the year by winning the prestigious Daytona 200 before traveling to Europe to compete in the world championships.[1][3][4] Baker won the 1977 Formula 750 title and finished second to Barry Sheene in the 500cc world championship.
Right decent for a local boy!
 
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Discussion Starter #69
They apparently let the Kawi designers design the muffler...
Evidently so. It looks like they just took the stocker off the H2 and used it as is.....sean
 

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Discussion Starter #70
A review of one of my favorite Bimotas of all time:
 
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