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Discussion Starter #1
Besides heat (hot sun) and lube, what do you do if a new tire won't fully seat at 40 psi? Is it safe to go up to 60-70 psi? Or is there a better way?
 

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Besides heat (hot sun) and lube, what do you do if a new tire won't fully seat at 40 psi? Is it safe to go up to 60-70 psi? Or is there a better way?
I seated mine last time with a bicycle pump and windex so. I'd suggest windex also make sure you've removed the valve stem core.

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I've seen some people use a flamible liquid and setting it on fire, looks pretty bad ass, but I don't think I would try it....


About 4:30 into this video shows how it works


 

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I remember I had a hell of a time getting my tires to seat as well, I think I ended up putting a ratchet strap around the circumference and ratcheting it down to push the center in and force the edges out towards the bead.
 

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Apply proper tire "mount lube" (really slippery stuff) and do multiple inflate/deflate attempts. Yes, higher than normal pressures may likely be required as well, accepted SOP in "SEATING THE BEAD" (proper name for the process)

In final seating, sounds like a small caliber gun going off. POP!
 

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My secret weapon is Gojo (the original, non-pumice type). Slather the rim and both beads liberally, pry the tire onto the rim with your irons, then give it a good shot of air down the empty valve stem with your blow gun to expand the tire enough to seal. Once it will hold air, install the core and inflate until both beads pop into proper position.

No worries if you need to over-inflate it a bit, but most of the time the beads will pop into place before you even reach standard pressure. No idea what's in the stuff but Gojo and rubber work very well together. I learned about alternate uses for Gojo from an amazing Mexican motorcycle mechanic when I was a kid back in the sixties.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Got it! Thanks, all. I was tempted to set it on fire but ended up doing multiple inflate/deflates with windex (didn't have the real stuff - but I do have Gojo so I'll try that next time). In the end, I went up to 60 psi - and still nothing. Whacked it about 30 times with a rubber mallet. Cursed and walked away to get some water. While my back was to it, "POP!"...."POP!" 😁
 

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One thing worth mentioning to anyone doing this, make sure keep your fingers away from the bead area. That goes for anything else you don't want to clamped on with high force.
 

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My secret weapon is Gojo (the original, non-pumice type). Slather the rim and both beads liberally, pry the tire onto the rim with your irons,
Irons? The automotive tire mount lube I've got has actually allowed me to slip/mount tire onto rim WITHOUT tools at all, hands only on more than 1 occasion. Can't recall specifics.... bike, brand of tire..front or rear....blah blah... but distinctly remember being amazed at how it just pushed on. Not every mount by hand ...sometimes requiring tire tools, but I'm blown away when they slip right on. Moreso considering I'm far from a pro weightlifter.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
One thing worth mentioning to anyone doing this, make sure keep your fingers away from the bead area. That goes for anything else you don't want to clamped on with high force.
Very good point. There was a split second when I felt my fingers there inadvertently while picking up the rim - soon before the tire popped into place by itself.

... but distinctly remember being amazed at how it just pushed on.
After taking a rock-hard old tire off, It's a relief how easy soft new tires go on.
 

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I used this tire lube called "nothins slicker than bullsnot", works amazing, mine seated at like 15psi. I'm not sure how slick bull snot is exactly, but I'll take their word for it.
52317
 

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Irons? The automotive tire mount lube I've got has actually allowed me to slip/mount tire onto rim WITHOUT tools at all, hands only on more than 1 occasion. Can't recall specifics.... bike, brand of tire..front or rear....blah blah... but distinctly remember being amazed at how it just pushed on. Not every mount by hand ...sometimes requiring tire tools, but I'm blown away when they slip right on. Moreso considering I'm far from a pro weightlifter.
Right you are. It depends on the stiffness of the tire and the depth of the rim but often they'll go either with no tools at all or just a final pry (or some thumps with a rubber hammer) to get that last little bit. If you've got nice wheels, the less prying with irons the better. It really helps to get the wheel solidly supported versus chasing it around the shop floor. A 5 gallon plastic bucket (AKA my shop trash can) works for me.
 

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I've posted this before, but it bears repeating. Don't use anything but tire lube for mounting tires. A) you don't know what's in the stuff and B) some of that stuff will cause major issues with your tire/wheel down the road.

Dish soap is not a tire lube. Don't use it as such. It is alkaline (the opposite of acid) and will eat your aluminum rim up. The aluminum oxide that forms, expands just like steel does when it rusts.

The expansion will push the tire bead off the rim and leak air. I've experienced exactly this, and had a tire go flat from it in the middle of a long ride. It sucks.

Other stuff that has a petroleum base will degrade the rubber of your tire. You may not be the one to experience the bead failing.

If you are at the last little bit where the bead does not seat, deflate the tire. Push the bead back and lubricate liberally. Then try again.

Making sure the valve core is removed is kind of important. You won't get enough volume of air in the tire, in the short amount of time needed with the core still in.

Pressure and lube are your friend when mounting a tire. Just don't use too much of either. Too much pressure can be dangerous and cause injury or even death if you push that too far. I've seen a rim fail under pressure and it ain't pretty.

Keep pressures relatively low. That doesn't mean 40 psi. That means don't go past 75 psi. If you don't get the bead to seat by then, refer back to where wrote about deflate the tire.

Lube is your friend. Until it isn't. I've had tires spin on the rim due to excessive lube....or too slick a lube. Best stuff I've ever used is made by Murphy's oil soap. It's a tire mounting compound with corrosion inhibitors in the formula.

It looks like grease but is made of soap. It's slick, but not too slick. You can buy it at any Napa auto parts store or on the internetz. I know for certain it is available on Amazon.

It is not prohibitively expensive either. I've seen a 1 gal container for around $20 and that would last you a life time of doing your own tires and your friend's too.
 
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I use this stuff. Been around forever and works well. $18 is a lifetime supply.
52322
 
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. Whacked it about 30 times with a rubber mallet. Cursed and walked away to get some water. While my back was to it, "POP!"...."POP!" 😁

The tried and true "Rubber Mallet" go-to!!! 🤣 🤣 🤣
When my rubber mallet comes out that means I've had enough and don't give a crap if I break something!!! I've gotten MUCH better in my "old age", but still...sometimes!

***I have a jar of the No Mar tire lube. Just a thin film around the edge of the tire and it works great! $30 a jar that lasts forever...or $3 for Windex (that also cleans glass!). Your choice!

 

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I use this stuff. Been around forever and works well. $18 is a lifetime supply. View attachment 52322
I use this stuff as well. Safe to say it's a lifetime supply for me, my kids and their kids!!

As for seating a tire on a bead, my dad taught this (as well as many other neat ones) to help persuade the bead close to the rim. Place a ratchet strap around the circumference of the tire, and tighten it until the bead is very close to the rim. A shot of air from a compressor and you very quickly get the pop-pop sound of success.

He ran Brit bikes back in the day, only able to afford beaters. They weren't exactly durable when new, so a neglected one was certainly a challenge. On of my favourites is his 'get you home' clutch fix. Clutch was slipping so bad it was providing no drive. He walked back to the nearest pub and the landlord gave him a bunch of wine corks. Crumble them up and place between the steels and friction plates. Just enough to save you walking a few miles down a country lane. Not a good solution for today's modern bikes that would circulate those bits into the oil pump, but it was good back on those old pre-unit bikes.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Lots of great tips here.

Re: the rubber mallet, when my wife saw me walking out with it she rolled her eyes and said "I think you need a break" (she probably should have called it a 'time-out'... haha) The mallet did nothing but I'm sure I'll use it again!
 
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