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I have a neighbor who has a motorcycle.
His property backs up to mine so we're right next to each other, but our addresses are on different streets and I've never met the guy.
Recently I've been thinking of going over there and introducing myself. Here's why:
In the summer months, usually at least once a day, he'll start up the motorcycle in his garage and rev the thing (Vroom! Vroom! Vroom!) for maybe 5 minutes or so, then shut it down.
He's been doing this for a couple of YEARS at least. I don't think he ever rides it. Just revs it.
From the sound of the engine, I think he needs to have the carbs cleaned (my Ninja sounded the same when it needed to be cleaned).
But after a couple of seasons of just revving that engine for a little while every day, I bet there's other things that need looking at as well.
Listening to an engine being treated that way is driving me nuts.
So I'm thinking, maybe I should go over and say, "Hey, I'm a motorcyclist too! What are you working on?"
That might be a way to start towards offering some friendly advice, and helping him get the bike running right, so he can take it out on the road again.
Then again, I wonder if for health reasons or whatever, he can't ride anymore, and maybe he likes to go out and twist the throttle and think about the good old days.
Then again, maybe he's a lunatic with a short fuse and a shotgun.
I'm looking for feedback. What would you do in a situation like this?
KH
 

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Have you actually seen the bike? I'd be simple and wait till he does it next and hop over asking to see what you've been hearing. Ask an open ended question or two "how long have you had it?" and any owner should start talking a bit.

Assuming this is not a cripple or sociopath, say that "I've heard that" the sort of treatment he is delivering is ... not advisable. See if he knows about trickle chargers, that he's not warming it up enough to do anything but keep introducing water inside the engine and exhaust, etc. Always try to phrase things in passive nonjudgmental ways and kind of act like you're not sure yourself but that this common sense stuff is just something you heard and are kind of curious about yourself. Try to get him to say about twice as much as you do, listen and hear him out, then offer some sugar-coated pearls of wisdom as they apply to what he brings up.

And feel free to use the old feel, found, find persuasion strategy.
 

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So I'm thinking, maybe I should go over and say, "Hey, I'm a motorcyclist too! What are you working on?"
Yep, probably the best way to approach it. You'll know pretty quick if he wants to talk or not.
There may be many reasons why he's not riding. Being broke is the easiest to deal with, inability to ride due to health might be hard for him to talk about.
 

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I tried to get to know my neighbors once. They had several packages of bike stuff delivered to my house (RevZilla packaging) they said thanks, shut the door in my face, and then built a fence of 10' fir trees along our property line...

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

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I tried to get to know my neighbors once. They had several packages of bike stuff delivered to my house (RevZilla packaging) they said thanks, shut the door in my face, and then built a fence of 10' fir trees along our property line...

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk

That's because you're a jerk!!! :p:p:p
 

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FOG story"
When I moved to Arkansas, we found a nice neighborhood of like minded people . so in a effort to make friends we had a open house every Christmas time. got as many as 60 people , Is was a BYOF thing and everyone loved it.
But, we never got as much as a "common over for coffee" from anyone else, so we abandoned it. Several asked "Are you going to have a party tis year?" we just replied no.

People are funny

FOG
 

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I understand people wanting their privacy. I respect my neighbors privacy as I expect my own to be.

That said, I’m friendly with all my immediate neighbors and my more long time neighbors.

I’ve lived in my ‘hood for well over 20 years. My wife grew up in this neighborhood. Her family moved here in 1975. She’s known all the long time neighbors since she was a little girl.

We get together with them once in a while to catch up on things. I don’t need to know their business....but tell them I do need to know who’s visiting.

Not to be nosey but I want to be able to identify people who don’t belong here. Those scoping out houses to break into, it those rolling through looking for something they can thieve quickly.

I look out for my neighbors and warn them when I see something odd or out of the ordinary. We had a lot of problems with homeless and mail theft. We don’t anymore.

We look out for one another. Doesn’t matter if we get along personally or not, we know we’re all in it together.

As for the neighbor the OP described....that’s a touchy subject.

I have neighbors behind my neighborhood. Some of them do exactly what you describe. Sometimes it’s a car other times a bike. I’m not the nosey neighbor who’s gonna go find out.

Just like when people I don’t know are busily trying to look in my garage when my door is open. I don’t know them. I don’t know their motives for looking in my garage.

The more suspicious ones, I make it a point to make sure they see me writing down their license plate number. I know they're up to no good when they see that and take off like they just got made.

My advice; let it be. Make an effort to meet the neighbor but leave your observations out until you get to know one another. Otherwise you’ll come across as the nosey neighbor. In some places, that can get you shot.
 
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I'm on the same page with Sean for once. :cool:

If you can meet the guy casually that's great, but it's an entirely different story to go out of your way to make introductions. There is likely a reason you haven't met him after years of being a neighbor. The world has changed, and people have changed over the years. The world doesn't seem to be the same place I grew up in. And the atmosphere right now with COVID-19, unemployment, civil unrest is a time of unease for lots of folks.

I tend to be cynical, my wife tells me I get more so every year.

I'm of the opinion to "let sleeping dogs lie".
 

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[QUOTE="Davenay67, post: 931419, member: 76723"
I'm of the opinion to "let sleeping dogs lie".
[/QUOTE]

Mine doesn't mind if there is a bonus in it for him........
like a 21in dirt bike tire:)
 

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My guess is he'd be really cool. Nobody get's to know their neighbors anymore. Maybe you should.
Even if he's a sociopath (espdecially if), this is sometihng you'd want to know, right?
 

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Even if he's a sociopath (espdecially if), this is sometihng you'd want to know, right?
who knows, you may both have more things (other than bikes) in common :eek:
seriously, I'd make the effort to at least meet and greet another biker in da 'hood.
 

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Being in Florida my neighbors tend to be in the "older" age bracket. But so far, I met one neighbor about 5 houses down as he'd always have his Dyna parked outside in his driveway, as if he was showing off. He'd sit outside with his dog and sometimes I'd see his wife there. Well, I'm a motorcycle and dog person so one day as i rode by I stopped and said, "Do you ride that thing or just marvel at it?". He came over and made a joke back and we've been friends ever since. I even opened him up to what a long ride was as all he ever did was ride local.
I also used to walk my dogs through one of the neighborhoods down the street. I did this for a year when I first moved in where I am now. There was a few guys with some old classic cars in their driveway but one always caught my eye. I couldn't for the life of me determine what car it was. So one day I saw him outside and I stopped, stared and finally yelled out, "What the hell is that thing?". Man oh man...the guy came out and wouldn't STOP talking about the car!!! 😁 He said that they had get together's down and the Hardee's every Wednesday night and I should go...so I did. All old, retired guys that love to restore the older cars...then sit in the parking lot's and talk fishing! 😁
So, I'm never afraid to at least inquire. I'm seeming to find most enjoy when someone asks.
 

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I agree that most motorcycle owners would be happy to meet another rider, though I wouldn't expect anyone to extend much courtesy to someone knocking on their door to say "You're doing it wrong. Let me teach you.", no matter how good the intentions.

I would go over, happy just to get to know another bike guy and see what he has to say. To me that's the key to meeting new people in general. Ask a question or two about something they're interested in and hear what they have to say.
 

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wait till he starts and runs his bike.....afterwards yell over the fence to him "what bike ya got there?" Include a "sounds awesome!" (even if it doesn't) The most obvious, instant icebreaker. If he's not apt to exchange with someone interested in HIS bike... his pulse needs checking.
 

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I agree that most motorcycle owners would be happy to meet another rider, though I wouldn't expect anyone to extend much courtesy to someone knocking on their door to say "You're doing it wrong. Let me teach you.", no matter how good the intentions.
If he's not apt to exchange with someone interested in HIS bike... his pulse needs checking.
I agree with both of you. It's different when you meet someone on a walk or while riding through the 'hood and they're out front with their pride and joy. Wholly different where that is not the case. Particularly if we're talking a more rural area where people have moved to in order to get away from nosey neighbors in subdivisions.

I would think, there are regional differences also. What is welcomed in one region might be a social faux pas in another. Or worse. It might be worthwhile to go for a walk or a ride by the place and try to catch the guy outside and start a random conversation. Break the ice. Probably a safer way than to just go knock on his door......sean
 
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